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Making the leap (or flip) in the classroom

Technology has to keep the wheel steady in the flipped classroom, says Daley Robinson, director of marketing, Stone Group

Posted by Rebecca Paddick | August 01, 2016 | Primary

The flipped classroom hasn’t really landed and taken root as, I think, it’s supporters would have hoped. It has such strong promise, such rich application, but it’s so difficult for one teacher, let alone an entire year, or school, to make the leap (or flip). Changing the way lessons are taught, and out-of-class work is handled, is hard. However, most schools and colleges already have the technology tools to make it work. And, I think it’s up to technology to steady the wheel for the flipped classroom, and keep this new way of learning moving forwards. 

I really believe that it needs to happen, because the current ways in which children are conventionally learning and interacting with information aren’t preparing them for the world of employment. Very few of us come away from meetings with colleagues or clients with homework or further reading. However, we all read agendas, reports, or do a bit of internet research on the subject matter before we go to a meeting, so that we can perform our best in the short time we have. Entering a meeting unprepared, something adults really don’t enjoy is the challenge schoolchildren are face each day when it comes to the classroom. They play catch up in lessons and use homework to show their talents instead.

I think it’s up to technology to steady the wheel for the flipped classroom, and keep this new way of learning moving forwards

The flipped classroom allows pupils to show their talents face to face, in the lesson, to win the debate, succeed in the experiment, demonstrate their skill - all in front of their teacher, and importantly, their peers. Life skills – teamwork, motivation of others, even failure, are experienced alongside others. This is how an office works.

In our professional lives, we also arm ourselves with technology to expedite a meeting and move between the responsibilities of the working day, from meeting room to a desk, on and of offsite. This technology we rely on in the office is already in schools – we need to ensure pupils are learning to use it ‘like professionals’ – taking advantage of laptops, tablets and the ability to access the school network from home, via a VPN or the cloud. 

Teachers and pupils don’t need to take work home, they can work from home and be ready for lessons. It’s homework that needs to be flipped, ideally, not the classroom itself. Let’s make homework more like work.

W: www.stonegroup.co.uk

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