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                    [post_content] => Today’s education landscape has dramatically changed, with technology now playing an integral part in the student experience. Digital classrooms allow both staff and students to be better connected and affords them numerous opportunities to access a wealth of information and collaborate in many ways.

However, this brings with it many challenges, notably the need to promote a safe learning environment. Cyber security threats affect us all and education institutions are no different so are therefore a prime target as threats continue to evolve.

“I simply don’t have time to chase malware. I know that with Malwarebytes in place, I can rest knowing that I have a backup of a brilliant piece of software with easy reports and email results. We are in control, not the Malware. “
Andrew Robinson, IT Manager, Middleton Technology School, Manchester

“Our legacy solution was not detecting next-generation malware. Since Malwarebytes, we’ve had no more advanced malware infections. Malwarebytes stopped high volumes of access to malicious sites, PUPs and ransomware.”
John Toulantas, ICT Manager, St Catherine’s School

 

Is your School at Risk?

Malwarebytes work closely with the education sector to prevent and remove threats, including ransomware, and in doing so, are mindful of tight budget constraints. Download your free guide summing up advice from the industries most experienced cyber security professionals to learn more about the current state of educational cyber security and how to achieve educational resilience for your institution.

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By downloading this report you are agreeing to receive our email newsletter which youc an unsubscribe to at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link on the bottom of the email. We will also share your details with MalwareBytes. Please see our privacy policy for full terms. [post_title] => Take your first step to endpoint resilience [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-your-first-step-to-endpoint-resilience [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-18 11:21:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-18 10:21:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=16392 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14925 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-05-28 00:00:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-27 23:00:14 [post_content] => What are 21st-century skills? Technology, more than almost any other factor, has changed the world. No sector or industry has escaped its effects, and the pace of change is only accelerating. So what does the modern worker need to navigate the workplace? And is education providing it? While the importance of new skill sets in the modern age are obvious, the actual definition of what those skills are can be somewhat nebulous. While some aspects of the modern workplace clearly require new competencies altogether, others seem comparatively unchanged by the growing omnipresence of technology. The obvious answer is, of course, digital competency. “Digital skills are very important,” says David Lakin, head of education at the IET. “The rapid development of technology over the last few years is obviously leaning more towards the digital space.”  In their 2019 DQ global standards report, the DQ Institute discusses the importance of the Digital Intelligence Quotient (or DQ, as opposed to IQ). Those with the right skills “can fully capitalise on new technologies, and thrive in this fast-changing digital age,” the report says. 

23% of the adult population in the UK lacks basic digital skills, which costs the national economy an estimated £63bn per year in lost GDP.*


But it’s not just IT capabilities that need to be considered. In 2017, Nesta released The Future of Skills: Employment in 2030 report. It states: “There are good reasons to believe that interpersonal skills will continue to grow in importance – not only as organisations seek to reduce the costs of coordination but also as they negotiate the cultural context in which globalisation and the spread of digital technology are taking place. Our findings also confirm the importance of higher-order cognitive skills such as originality, fluency of ideas and active learning.”  Joysy John, director of education at Nesta, says that what has changed is the amount of information available. She comments: “With the rapid rise in big data and social media, young people need to understand how to interpret data, how to understand what information is accurate, and what information is just fake news. The key new skills would be critical thinking and being able to manage the information overload.” “With the fourth industrial revolution, we know that young people need to adapt,” adds John. “They need to make sure they are well prepared for changing roles and changing jobs.”  Twenty-first-century skills, therefore, can be seen as the meeting place between technological and interpersonal competencies. Above all, they revolve around the ability to adapt and learn quickly in the face of rapidly changing job markets, industries and societies. [caption id="attachment_14926" align="alignnone" width="1164"] Figure 1[/caption] Is education meeting the challenge? As research continues to reveal this remarkably specific skill set, a new question arises: is education providing the opportunity to develop it? According to John, no. “There is excessive emphasis on league tables and on reading and maths, and not enough emphasis placed on problem-solving, enquiry-based approaches or even authentic learning, which is learning by doing rather than by rote learning. Not enough is happening within the classroom within the curriculum due to the challenges and pressures that teachers and schools face.” This focus is only made worse when one considers the problem of adaptability. Technology, as already established, develops incredibly quickly. Education, on the other hand (especially state-mandated education such as the school system), takes a lot longer.  Dr Yuhyun Park of the DQ Institute explains: “[Education has to] understand the trend, go through the research, and go through education curriculum development and teacher development, which takes a minimum of three to four years.” He adds: “If it takes three to four years it’s very fast. But in three to four years, digital technology’s moving at the speed of light, so there’s unfair competition between government, especially the education sectors, and technology.  “So by the nature of how it’s been formulated, it’s difficult for the government to take the lead in the shift in the education footwork.”  The problem only gets worse when dealing with specific technologies. For example, students can be educated in coding languages and technical systems that will be obsolete by the time they graduate. What’s happening now? Despite these difficulties, education in the UK is beginning to improve. According to Lakin, there have been “a lot more initiatives both that can be used in the classroom as part of the national curriculum, and enhancement activities and projects that involve coding, and other activites that young people can relate to.” An example of this can be found in one of the IET’s own projects – the First Lego League. It was created in collaboration with Lego Education and FIRST, an international charity dedicated to promoting STEM education around the world. First Lego League is now the largest STEM competition in the UK.  [caption id="attachment_14927" align="alignnone" width="740"] Figure 2[/caption] “The students that take part in that programme are developing not only a knowledge-based engineering skill set in terms of coding and building, but also core skills,” says Lakin. First Lego League’s success is shown in its popularity. Over the 2018/19 academic year, over 8,000 students competed as part of 820 teams. This summer, a projected 5,000 students between the ages of six and nine will take part in the first Lego League Junior, and the IET are piloting a new scheme for FIRST and Lego education targeting four to six-year-olds, called Discovery. It’s far from the only such programme currently in use. Nesta has published a toolkit based on its research into future workplace trends. Unlike First Lego League, the toolkit is aimed at teachers, providing them with a briefing, lesson plans and a video to help them expose their students to the changing modern workplace. “The more we can give young people an understanding of the changing world of work and how different skills and knowledge are likely to see an increasing or decreasing demand in the future, the more that they will be prepared for that future,” says John. These programmes, and many others like them, are steps in the right direction, but large-scale reform is needed, one way or another. According to Lakin, “the future of education needs to keep up with modern technology. With that comes challenges. Again, we’re trying to teach them skills for things that may be out of date by the time they graduate. Obviously the fundamentals and foundation of skills, particularly STEM subjects, will always be relevant.”

Around one-tenth of the workforce are in occupations that are likely to grow as a percentage of the workforce and around one-fifth are in occupations that will likely shrink.**


Park agrees. “There’s a lot of movement to ensure that in future education will meet the needs of 21st-century skills,” she says.  What next? Beyond a heavy focus on up-to-date STEM education, there’s room for more radical changes. “Rather than focusing on narrow subjects, we need to start thinking about how we can make sure that kids are looking at subjects across the sciences and humanities,” argues John. “The second thing is getting industry more involved in what’s happening in classrooms so that students are working on projects that are based on real-life problems. The third thing is collaboration. Rather than assessing individual students, we should start assessing students on teamwork.” In either case, one thing is certain; in the face of a changing world, the worker of tomorrow will require a changing skill set. It is the responsibility of today’s educators, in both the public and private sector, to ensure they have it. 

You might also like: Three skills for tomorrow’s classroom


Sources: *House of Commons, Science and Technology Committee, Digital Skills Crisis **Nesta, The Future of Skills: Employment in 2030 [post_title] => The 21st-century skillset [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-21st-century-skillset [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-07 15:19:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-07 14:19:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=14925 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15036 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2019-05-12 00:00:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-11 23:00:21 [post_content] => Forget Wonder Woman, Spiderman or Captain Marvel, it’s teachers who are the real superheroes. From long days to overcrowded classrooms and a low net income, teachers and educators need all the support they can get. A common challenge is teaching students the importance of original thinking and how to reference and cite sources correctly. With over 17,000 cases of plagiarism reported in 2016 in the UK alone**, it is as important as ever to address plagiarism and teach students how to avoid it. That is where Urkund fits in. As market leader in northern Europe with 20 years of experience, Urkund is at the forefront of detecting and preventing plagiarism. It can be integrated into all major learning management systems such as Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, Brightspace, and Sakai. All while being non-intrusive to the workflow. Connecting to Urkund is painless, quick and requires only a couple of steps. Many former teachers work at Urkund, which means that we understand the challenges of the modern-day classroom. Especially the importance of feedback. At Urkund, we want to guide students rather than simply sending back a marked report.

Feedback, marking and grading in Urkund

Urkund is easily integrated into learning management systems to enable teachers to review student assignments. Thanks to our non-intrusive integrations into LMS systems, Urkund also allows you to grade your students’ tasks and give them valuable feedback directly in your LMS. Through strategic partnerships, Urkund can also provide feedback and marking functionality even if you are not using an LMS. Using our sophisticated matching technology, we check for potential plagiarism in submitted assignments. Results of our analysis are reported back to the teacher allowing them to take the matter into their own hands. In this way, Urkund is a valuable pedagogical tool that has a strong preventive effect, promoting originality and fairness in academic work. It gives students the right methodology and toolkit right from the start, enabling them to excel in the next steps of their education. laptop-classroom-tablet-student-stock

Original thinking – better education

Urkund does not only encourage a discussion around plagiarism, it also allows you to emphasise the importance of original thinking and creativity, which will ultimately elevate the quality of education. Urkund is used by thousands of universities, colleges and schools worldwide, including: Glasgow University, Murdoch University, Forth Valley College, Dublin Institute of Technology, Gloucestershire College, Copenhagen Business School, Karolinska Institutet and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), to name a few. As Grant Goodwin, quality assurance manager at the Dublin Business School, highlights: “Urkund has certainly assisted in reviewing cases of suspected academic impropriety.”

How do I get started?

Urkund is intuitive and effortless to use. Once an assignment is uploaded, it is analysed by our sophisticated software using machine learning algorithms to detect matches whilst minimising false positives. The findings are sent to the educator within seconds in an easy-to-read report that highlights text blocks that are potential cases of plagiarism and the sources from which they were taken. At this stage, the educator is in a position to determine whether these cases are plagiarism, based on solid evidence. We understand that plagiarism is a serious problem in classrooms today. Prevention is always better than cure and it is important to teach students how to research, cite and reference correctly. Urkund is a tool to help you evaluate if there is a problem, but the ultimate solution to plagiarism is education. Feel free to contact us at Urkund for a free trial and take the first step towards eliminating plagiarism at your learning institution. Visit us here for more information or contact us at +44 203 608 19 67 or sales@urkund.com. **QAA Plagiarism in Higher Education Report 2016 [post_title] => Teachers are the real heroes [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => teachers-are-the-real-heroes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-24 12:28:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-24 11:28:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=15036 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14211 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-04-02 15:11:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-02 14:11:37 [post_content] => Tomorrow, April 3, will see the launch of the Department for Education’s new edtech strategy for England. In anticipation of the official announcement, we spoke with a variety of edtech experts about their hopes and expectations for the strategy.
You might also like: Education secretary outlines edtech strategy for England
Here’s what they had to say:

Dave Kenworthy, director of digital service, CoSector – University of London

"I would like to see the DfE announcement address the key areas where tech could provide innovative solutions to alleviate burden for educational organisations, i.e. providing better teaching practices, streamlining the assessment processes, and improved training and development. “We need to be looking at each of these processes and the part they play in the learner’s journey as a whole. We urgently need to improve the automation around these less interesting but crucial administration processes in order to free up resources, enabling a better standard of teaching and an enhanced learner journey.
I would like to see the DfE announcement address the key areas where tech could provide innovative solutions to alleviate burden for educational organisations. – Dave Kenworthy, CoSector
“Establishments need to be partnered with suppliers who will enable and manage this process long-term, ensuring that the infrastructure capability is there when the latest new technology is ready to be implemented, advising on upgrades down the line to future-proof the investment."

Ty Goddard, co-founder, The Education Foundation and chair, Edtech UK

“This long-awaited edtech strategy from the DfE will provide some of the scaffolding and support for England’s schools, to deepen their use and understanding of education technology. “I predict that the strategy will take a good positive look at increasing connectivity across our school estates. It will build on the work of the DCMS and others on our national connectivity challenge. “Our work on the Edtech50 Schools project highlights schools that understand how to use technology to support teachers, and deepen teaching and learning. These digital flagship schools already demonstrate a focused sense of what is useful to them in terms of tech. “This new and welcome strategy, I think, will look at how we harness schools already on the digital journey to support others. Kept simple and imaginative, this ‘facilitated collaboration’ is a powerful system response to the change management we need.
This new and welcome strategy, I think, will look at how we harness schools already on the digital journey to support others. – Ty Goddard, Edtech UK
“Following on the heels of positive guidance from the Education Endowment Foundation on technology, we will see more work and debate on impact, and importantly, the nature of real ‘value’ that edtech across a school or group of schools can bring. “The edtech sector has worked tirelessly to lobby and impress on government the need for high level support. It has taken a good while; and next steps ought to be further cross-Whitehall focus, wise investment and support. The secretary of state deserves praise for the priority he has given to education technology.”

Chris Rothwell, director of education, Microsoft UK

“Technology is having incredible impact in all aspects of education today, but there is always more to be done.  We welcome the announcement of an edtech strategy for England, with its focus on building on existing best practice and lowering barriers to adoption for all.”

Naimish Gohil, CEO, Satchel

“I hope the DfE strategy puts initiatives in place that will help school leaders effectively deploy technology at their schools, without using unnecessary jargon in their communications and expectations.
I hope the DfE strategy puts initiatives in place that will help school leaders effectively deploy technology at their schools, without using unnecessary jargon in their communications and expectations. – Naimish Gohil, Satchel
“We need to help school leaders to look at technology and its implementation from an aerial view, so they can see the potential, as opposed to leaving them to make knee-jerk decisions when they're in the weeds and can't take a step back to truly evaluate the impact of any new technology in their school. “If the DfE is able to do this with their strategy, we then start to really instil the value of technology at the very top of the school, avoiding poor decision making, and will finally be able to help school leaders realise why technology is not only important in planning for tomorrow, but is already a part of the fabric of life today.”

Sonia Blizzard, managing director, Beaming

“Safeguarding is one of the biggest issues for the schools we work with, so it is important that the new technology strategy ensures cyber safety remains central to the way they manage information, and that schools are provided with the resources they need to protect their IT assets and the huge amount of personal data they hold."

 Dan Sandhu, CEO, Sparx

"We're eagerly awaiting the publication of the DfE's edtech strategy, and hope that it will focus on helping schools to engage with proven technologies that make a positive impact – not just on student attainment, but also on teachers' wellbeing.
We hope that [the strategy] will focus on helping schools to engage with proven technologies that make a positive impact – not just on student attainment, but also on teachers' wellbeing.  – Dan Sandhu, Sparx
"The attaiment gap for disadvantaged pupils is continuing to grow, while classroom support for SEND students is still a major challenge. Innovative technologies are already making an impact on these students, as part of a holistic approach that involves complementing teacher skills with impactful edtech. We expect to see the DfE's strategy make clear that edtech is not about replacing teachers, but about empowering them to tackle the most pressing challenges.
"Similarly, we hope that the strategy will place emphasis on how edtech can help stem the tide of stressed teachers leaving the profession due to the pressures being placed upon them – an issue highlighted this week in a new report from UCL. Edtech has a massive role to play in supporting teachers to achieve more without compromising their wellbeing, and this should be a key focus for any educational strategy going forward."
*This article was amended at 16:43 to add comment from Dan Sandhu at Sparx
[post_title] => DfE edtech strategy 2019 – what can we expect? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dfe-edtech-strategy-2019-what-can-we-expect [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-02 16:43:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-02 15:43:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=14211 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14138 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2019-03-29 14:10:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-29 14:10:23 [post_content] => Schools from across England are being invited to sign up for free to the Institute of Physics’ (IOP) Improving Gender Balance national research trial.  The trial, funded by the Department for Education (DfE) will work with teachers on whole-school approaches to tackling gender stereotyping and the resulting limits on both boys and girls’ choices. In doing so it seeks to redress the fact that for more than 30 years only a fifth of those taking A-level physics in the UK have been girls. The randomised control trial, will see half of participating schools receiving a wide ranging programme of valuable evidence-based support including:
  • Training and continuous professional development for teachers
  • The development of a whole-school strategy to combat gender stereotyping
  • Options evenings, careers guidance, and student-led projects
  • A dedicated, Institute of Physics coach
A previous smaller scale pilot project run across six schools in 2014-2016 saw the number of girls taking A-level physics more than treble over two years. Participating schools reported that a non-gendered whole school approach and head-on tackling of gender stereotypes had equipped teachers to ensure that all students were able to explore the possibility of studying subjects across the board, irrespective of gender. 55% of A-levels were awarded to girls in 2018. However, girls just 43% of A levels awarded in STEM subjects and only 22% of A-levels awarded in physics, with only 13% of girls who achieved grade A or A* in GCSE physics going on to study the subject at A-level. This compares to 39% of boys who go on to study physics at A-level having achieved grade A or A* in the subject at GCSE (Institute of Fiscal Studies, August 2018).
We want to ensure that as many young people as possible, irrespective of gender, have the chance to benefit from the opportunities studying physics can open up.  – Beth Bramley, IOP
The Institute of Physics’ ground-breaking Improving Gender Balance trial is open to all state-funded co-ed secondary schools where a gap currently exists between the proportion of girls and boys taking physics A-level and all girls schools with a relatively low number of girls progressing to A-level in physics. All interested schools can sign up to participate in the trial at https://beta.iop.org/IGBtrial, with applications open until 31 May 2019. Beth Bramley, gender balance programme manager at the Institute of Physics commented: "Physics is hugely rewarding subject to study at A-level and a gateway subject to so many exciting career roles and higher education options. We want to ensure that as many young people as possible, irrespective of gender, have the chance to benefit from the opportunities it can open up. "This ground-breaking research study represents a unique opportunity to make a real difference. It will tell us what really ‘works’, embed whole-school approaches to tackling gender stereotyping and help set the future agenda for best practice in gender balance improvement in schools." [post_title] => Major new Institute of Physics research trial tackles barriers to girls’ progression in physics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => major-new-institute-of-physics-research-trial-tackles-barriers-to-girls-progression-in-physics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-29 14:10:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-29 14:10:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=14138 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13862 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-03-12 10:26:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-12 10:26:22 [post_content] => An IBM technology course launched eight years ago in the US is finally to get its UK pilot. IBM’s Pathways in Technology (P-Tech) programme offers education, work experience, and paid internship opportunities to school and college students.
You might also like: UCL scheme to help teachers overcome edtech 'fear'
The programme will initially launch at two schools and one college in Leeds, following the success of the model in the USA, established in 2011. The first cohort are set to begin studies in September 2019. Judith Blake, leader of Leeds City Council, said: “We want Leeds to be the best city for children and young people to grow up in, and are very proud to be the first city in the UK to be involved in P-Tech, which we believe has the potential to offer better futures for young people.” [caption id="attachment_13866" align="alignnone" width="790"]IBM-P-Tech-US-school-district-rollout Schools in the US have already seen the successful roll-out of P-Tech
Image via ptech.org[/caption] The model combines traditional secondary school teaching with tertiary-level education, work experience placements, and paid internship opportunities provided by industry partners. Students will have the chance to graduate from the programme with a level four qualification, such as BTEC or HNC, that will enable them to apply for entry-level jobs, or enter higher education. Industry partners play a main role in the programme, providing students with access to one-to-one mentoring, worksite visits, and project days. The partners will also work closely with participating schools by employing a P-Tech fellow who will serve as a school-business liaison officer, and adapt curriculum content to suit students’ needs. Students will then be first in line for jobs with their industry partner.
We are very proud to be the first city in the UK to be involved in P-Tech, which we believe has the potential to offer better futures for young people. – Judith Blake, Leeds City Council
P-Tech runs on an open enrolment concept, with no exam or entrance requirements. It also specifically focuses on students from disadvantaged communities, to address social inclusion and the lack of diversity in the tech world. IBM aims to have at least 200 P-Tech schools across 13 countries by the end of 2019. To date, 185 students have graduated from P-Tech schools, and early results show an on-time graduation rate five times the average for low-income students.* Cockburn School, Cockburn John Charles Academy, and Leeds City College will be the first institutions to run P-Tech in the UK, with support from Leeds City Council, Leeds Beckett University, and a range of employers including IBM. More information on the programme can be found at ptech.org *in the US [post_title] => Successful tech programme from IBM gets UK pilot [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => successful-tech-programme-from-ibm-gets-uk-pilot [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-12 12:32:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-12 12:32:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=13862 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13325 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-02-16 00:00:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-16 00:00:19 [post_content] => Digital business advocate Manchester Digital has launched a roadshow to complement its Digital Her campaign, aimed at encouraging more women to pursue careers in tech. The roadshow, entitled Inspire & Empower, is part of Digital Her, which engages with GCSE and A-level STEM subjects, and aims to give young women the confidence to explore careers in digital and tech across the North West. The first roadshow event took place earlier this week (12 February) at Queen Elizabeth Hall in Oldham, where attendees met Digital Her ambassadors, attended skills-based workshops, and had the chance to enrol in ring-fenced work placements with local employers. Katie Gallagher, managing director at Manchester Digital said: “The only way we can solve the current skills shortage is by connecting industry to education, and part of that is about inspiring young women to take up careers in digital and tech. “We are lucky to be home to a number of progressive and forward-thinking companies who are committed to working with us to make a difference and ensure that our industry is inclusive and diverse.”
The only way we can solve the current skills shortage is by connecting industry to education, and part of that is about inspiring young women to take up careers in digital and tech. – Katie Gallagher, Manchester Digital
Digital Her was created as a result of Manchester Digital’s 2018 Digital Skills Audit, which revealed that just over a third of the North West’s tech sector are women, and that only 19% of these women are in technical roles. This rose to 20% of women in technical roles in 2019. Despite this meagre increase, girls are still less likely than boys to take STEM subjects at GCSE and A-level. Studies from the Wise Campaign show that despite girls outperforming boys overall in STEM, numbers of enrolment are still considerably uneven. In 2018, 66% of girls who took STEM subjects received A*–C (9–4) grades, compared to 62% of boys. However, only 38% of A level maths students were girls, with physics and computing seeing even lower numbers, at 22% and 12% respectively. The Inspire & Empower Roadshow will visit each of Manchester's ten boroughs, as part of Digital Her’s 2019 programme. For more information, see  https://www.manchesterdigital.com/digital-futures/digital-her [post_title] => Women in STEM scheme launches roadshow [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => scheme-for-women-in-stem-launches-roadshow [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-02-15 15:13:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-02-15 15:13:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=13325 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12788 [post_author] => 74 [post_date] => 2019-01-31 14:44:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-31 14:44:00 [post_content] => Adobe and the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) announce a partnership designed to bring digital and creative skills to the fore across one of the most internationally loved and timeless classroom topics: Shakespeare. This year around 2 million children in the UK will learn about Shakespeare in school, with an estimated 600,000 taking an exam involving his work. This long-term partnership will support teachers looking to inject additional digital skills and creativity into their classroom practice. It will also help students develop the creative problem solving skills increasingly needed in the workplace. In 2018, the World Economic Forum predicted that nearly 50% of companies expect automation to reduce their full-time workforce by 2022 and listed problem solving, critical thinking and creativity as the top three skills that children need to be taught for future success. According to Adobe’s own research, 90% of educators believe that better ways should be found to integrate creative problem solving into the curricula. And in Time to Listen, the RSC and Tate-led study conducted by the University of Nottingham, 6,000 responses from 14-18-year olds consistently reported that art subjects were the only places they were able to develop creatively, enhance their critical thinking and explore their own opinions and ideas. Adobe’s partnership with the RSC aims to address this via a series of initiatives throughout 2019 and beyond. As part of the RSC’s popular First Encounters* with Shakespeare touring productions for 7-13-year olds, Adobe will co-present the 2019 tour which for the first time, will include a digital learning experience through Adobe Spark and Creative Cloud. Teachers will also receive free teaching resources full of creative exercises and ideas combining Adobe’s cutting-edge technological expertise with the RSC’s unique rehearsal room approach to teaching Shakespeare. Giving teachers an understanding of how to use the techniques that RSC actors use in rehearsals to unlock Shakespeare’s language and plays, the resources will also integrate Adobe’s creative tools including video, production, graphics and animation. In turn, for students who are native content creators, it gives the opportunity to explore their creativity around a core subject. Mala Sharma, VP & GM Creative Cloud at Adobe, said: “As an industry it’s our responsibility to ensure teachers have the resources and support they need to make creativity a core part of the curriculum to ensure the success of the next generation workforce. Adobe does this through technology and programs to promote creativity for all. We are proud to partner with the Royal Shakespeare Company to empower teachers to infuse creativity into the classroom.” Jacqui O’Hanlon, RSC Director of Education, added: “The RSC and Adobe believe that creativity and the arts should be an integral part of every child’s education regardless of where they live, where they go to school or perceived ability. “The RSC works with thousands of teachers, children and schools up and down the country and has always known about the transformative and life-enhancing power of the arts. Increasingly research - including our own Time to Listen study – has shown the special power that arts subjects play in developing creativity in young people as well as improving well-being. “The ability to think critically and creatively is at a premium now in terms of workplace skills. But this work is about so much more than that. The arts make us think deeply about what it is to be human. They encourage empathy, help us develop tolerance and show us new ways of seeing ourselves and the world around us. These things are essential if we want to equip young people, not just with the skills that they need to succeed in the workplace, but with the attributes they need to find their place in the world and contribute positively to their communities and society at large.” Adobe Spark for Education and single sign-on is free for all education institutions globally. Whilst Creative Cloud Apps are available for £5 per person per year for Primary and Secondary Schools (K-12). These apps and services empower students to think creatively and communicate expressively, so they can turn their classroom ideas into college and career opportunities. [post_title] => Adobe & The Royal Shakespeare Company join forces to champion creativity in education [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => adobe-the-royal-shakespeare-company-join-forces-to-champion-creativity-in-education [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-31 14:44:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-31 14:44:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=12788 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12465 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-01-17 12:11:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-17 12:11:04 [post_content] => The UK higher education sector is "complacent" when it comes to technology investment, says the director of a global edtech company. Andrew Robinson, director of higher education at Cengage, spoke to Education Technology in anticipation of the release of the firm's Student Voices report. Robinson said the UK HE sector needs to focus on improving the depth and efficacy of simple tech such as self-quizzing and practice assessments. He told ET: “We already have a world-class higher education system in the UK, but the question is, is it delivering the right outcomes for our students in terms of employability?” He added: “Students are going to university with a very high expectation of digital resources enhancing their experience, and they’re often finding that they’re very disappointed when they get there.” Robinson noted that while secondary education has adapted to integrating edtech well, higher education in the UK is not addressing that critical skills deficit. “Students have come from a background of Quizlet and HegartyMaths, and all of these tools that they use at secondary level and, frankly speaking, higher education has not made these changes.”
We haven’t invested in accelerating HE as fast as we should, and that we’re not getting the outcomes we’d like to. –Andrew Robinson, Cengage
Stressing the importance of getting the basics right, he said: “Students are very utilitarian. They’re very tactical about what they want.” He told ET: “We get a bit complacent about it. We think, quite rightly, that we already have a very advanced and world-class HE system, but that means we haven’t invested in accelerating it as fast as we should, and that we’re not getting the outcomes we’d like to.” The report revealed that the most used digital resources by students in HE are test yourself and practice questions, which achieved a 5.8/7 score in importance. Contrastingly, more modern technology such as simulations received only a 4.1/7 score. Adapting to students' needs, and providing more help with independent learning could assist with lowering the 8% undergraduate dropout rate, the report revealed. The report focused on undergraduate students across the UK, the Netherlands, Scandinavia and South Africa. The full report from Cengage can be found at cengage.co.uk/student_voices *update: this article was updated to correct a quotation on 18.01.19 [post_title] => HE 'complacent' about edtech, claims director [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => he-complacent-about-edtech-claims-director [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-18 09:44:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-18 09:44:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=12465 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6921 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2018-11-24 00:00:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-24 00:00:54 [post_content] => A concerning 84% of young people have advised they don’t feel there is enough information available on how to pursue a career within digital sectors, according to new research by the Climb Academy. The research, which surveyed 1,000 young people between the ages of 18 and 34 on their perceptions of digital skills, also revealed that nearly half of respondents (46%) felt that obtaining experience within a digital sector, such as coding or digital marketing, would improve their job opportunities, where a further 26% felt that an understanding of digital sectors would future-proof their job roles. The survey follows recent reports that the digital skills gap could cost the UK £141 Billion in GDP growth*, as more and more professionals struggle to keep pace with the advancing technological landscape. On discussing the Climb Academy’s recent findings, founder Mark Wright said: “Despite the continued advances in technology and exponential growth in digital industries, it’s clear that we as society simply cannot keep pace. What’s most interesting about the survey results, however, is that this skills gap evidently extends to young professionals as well, where the majority have confirmed they don’t feel there is enough information or support on the different career paths available through digital.” “This is somewhat alarming, but with the right careers guidance and training platforms and opportunities in place, it can be rectified.”
This skills gap evidently extends to young professionals as well, where the majority have confirmed they don’t feel there is enough information or support on the different career paths available through digital. – Mark Wright, Climb Academy
Other take outs from the research include:
  • Over one third (38%) of young professionals spend in excess of 4 hours per day on their mobile device.
  • Half of respondents (53%) selected Facebook as their preferred social media channel, closely followed by Instagram (37%).
  • A massive 83% of respondents felt that professionals of all ages would benefit from learning digital skills, including digital marketing and coding.
  • A quarter of young professionals learn best by watching video content.
Wright concluded: “Digital industries offer a wealth of exciting career paths for young professionals, ranging from web development to cyber security. The educational sector needs to place as much importance on the promoting the benefits of these roles as they do vocational careers.” “Without a growth in digitally skilled professionals, very few members of society are going to be able to grasp and understand the tech landscape as it continues to develop and evolve, where cyber security breaches will become a paramount concern.” Launched in Spring 2018, the Climb Academy has been developed in partnership with leading edtech firm, e-Careers and digital marketing professionals from Climb Online, the digital marketing agency owned in partnership between Mark Wright and Lord Sugar. Its entry-level course provides the opportunity for professionals to enter the digital marketing sector or for existing professionals to enhance their digital skillset. For more details, visit: https://www.climb.academy [post_title] => Not enough information on digital careers, say young people [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => not-enough-information-on-digital-careers-say-young-people [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-11-21 14:39:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-21 14:39:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=6921 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16392 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-07-17 16:15:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-17 15:15:20 [post_content] => Today’s education landscape has dramatically changed, with technology now playing an integral part in the student experience. Digital classrooms allow both staff and students to be better connected and affords them numerous opportunities to access a wealth of information and collaborate in many ways. However, this brings with it many challenges, notably the need to promote a safe learning environment. Cyber security threats affect us all and education institutions are no different so are therefore a prime target as threats continue to evolve. “I simply don’t have time to chase malware. I know that with Malwarebytes in place, I can rest knowing that I have a backup of a brilliant piece of software with easy reports and email results. We are in control, not the Malware. “ Andrew Robinson, IT Manager, Middleton Technology School, Manchester “Our legacy solution was not detecting next-generation malware. Since Malwarebytes, we’ve had no more advanced malware infections. Malwarebytes stopped high volumes of access to malicious sites, PUPs and ransomware.” John Toulantas, ICT Manager, St Catherine’s School  

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Take your first step to endpoint resilience

Malware is one of the most critical threats hitting the education sector. Endpoint resilience is an imperative

The 21st-century skillset

Kevin O’Malley asks if education is preparing today’s students for tomorrow’s workplace

Teachers are the real heroes

At Urkund, we want to guide students rather than simply sending back a marked report

DfE edtech strategy 2019 – what can we expect?

We speak to a number of edtech experts about what they expect to see from tomorrow’s edtech strategy for England, and what they would like to see prioritised

Major new Institute of Physics research trial tackles barriers to girls’ progression in physics

Schools invited to sign up to ground-breaking DfE-funded Improving Gender Balance programme

Successful tech programme from IBM gets UK pilot

The Pathways in Technology programme provides tech education, work experience, and paid internship opportunities for young people

Women in STEM scheme launches roadshow

The Digital Her programme from Manchester Digital has kicked off a roadshow to encourage women in tech

Adobe & The Royal Shakespeare Company join forces to champion creativity in education

Strategic partnership highlights the need for industry to support educators in bringing creativity and creative problem-solving to the fore

HE ‘complacent’ about edtech, claims director

Edtech falling behind secondary education levels

Not enough information on digital careers, say young people

Recent research by Climb Academy has revealed that 84% of young people feel that there isn’t enough information on digital careers