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Remember and regurgitate, or develop skills for life? Getting students to engage meaningfully with a school, college or university’s assessments can be a challenge. But technology can be a game changer, allowing educators to mirror what students might have to do in their working lives. Blogging is one such skill, and is increasingly popular as a method of assessment in universities. University of Edinburgh lecturers Nina Morris and Hazel Christie looked at how geology and geography students responded to blogging as part of their assessment, and noted that “the continuous nature of blogging compels students to engage more, not just in individual classes, but also across the course as a whole. As a result, students are more able to make connections between course themes and make evaluations based on a broader subject knowledge base.”  Meanwhile, they concluded that tutors were given a more personal insight into what their students were learning. In the further education and schools sectors, a similarly open-minded approach to learning outcomes has led many to experiment  with online tools like SeeSaw through which students can create drawings, voice recordings and videos to show what they know in the way that works best for them.

Saving teachers time

It’s clear that it’s not just the learners being assessed that benefit from technology, but also their educators. Haylie Taylor has 13 years’ teaching experience, a decade of which was spent in primary schools, and she reflected on the main challenges for teachers: the first one being finding assessments. After all the printing and queuing for photocopiers that is associated with traditional paper assignments, she says that the appeal of online teaching and learning tools like EducationCity, for whom she now works as a consultant, is that “all assessments for the core subjects can be housed in one place. They can be set in just a few clicks and students can simply login on a computer or tablet to complete the assessment.”

Secondly, she recalls the heavy marking load: “Marking one 20-question assessment for one student might take 15 minutes. However, marking a whole class worth of English and maths assessments can take a weekend, and that’s if you’re quick! Then comes the data collection and analysis – this can be very time-consuming and labour intensive, especially if your assessment and data platforms are separate and you have to transfer this information between the two.” Online systems often mark automatically, providing teachers with the data they need instantly ­– often presented in a simple visual report to help them identify gaps and misconceptions at a glance.

Finally, Taylor notes that lots of time can be spent on closing the final part of that feedback loop. She says: “After getting to grips with the data, I’d need to think about how I’m going to support my class with those gaps and misconceptions that have been identified. If I already have the resources, I need to re-teach or allow my students to practice, then great, but if not, more time will be needed to either source or create relevant, curriculum-linked resources.” This is a further area where technology can assist by providing a central hub, with assignments tagged to relevant content. She says: “In some cases, the curriculum content can even be assigned automatically based on assessment results, saving teachers a significant chunk of time.”


SPONSORED: Maintaining academic integrity with Urkund

By Neil Walker, senior account manager, Nordics

Technology has changed the way we do business, live our lives and interact as human beings. One part of that change can be observed in the classroom. Suddenly, mobile phones were omnipresent and information available a few taps away, presenting new challenges and opportunities. One of these new challenges was to handle the information overflow and the mere copy-pasting of sources, legitimate or not. According to recent studies, cheating went up a staggering 40% in the years between 2015–2018 at top UK universities.*

Which isn’t all that surprising. More and more universities and schools are opting for technical solutions such as Urkund, which ultimately leads to a higher hit rate of exposed academic misconduct. Instead of having educators scrolling endlessly through documents trying to single out sources, a fully automated system doing the work for them can be a true lifesaver. Besides the fact it saves time it also checks sources that are behind paywalls or were previously submitted by another student. Based on our experience, this is where 80% of all plagiarism can be found. A great upside is (and this is confirmed by teachers over and over again) that the pure fact of having a plagiarism checker at your institution helps prevent it. It enables a conversation around the topic, how to avoid it and why it is a danger to academic integrity.

*(https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/apr/29/cheating-at-top-uk-universities-soars-by-30-per-cent)


Collaboration between schools

In order to look afresh at these and other challenges, Church Cowley Saint James Church of England Primary School in Oxfordshire recently brought together 14 previously unlinked primary schools to work on assessing writing tasks by Year 6 children using technology called RM Compare. This shows teachers two anonymous pieces of work side-by-side on a screen, and the teacher judges which of those best meets the simplified assessment criteria. The system then uses an algorithm to intelligently select and pair similarly ranked work side-by-side. Headteacher Steve Dew says: “The main success of using the technology is the opportunity to collaborate with other schools on what good/great writing looks like. From that our teachers have a good idea of what good writing looks like from a sample of 415 children’s writing, and not just that within our school – this sort of information and analysis has not been available to us previously. This has had a positive impact on how we plan and teach lessons, has raised our bar of expectation and given us some great exemplar material to support the children’s understanding too.”

As Haylie Taylor indicated, the assessment cycle continues after a mark is decided, and can usefully inform educators on how to best teach a given cohort. Dew cites standards in years 3 and 4 as an example of this. He says that the school felt they had a handle on attainment within these classes – but there was a surprise to come when they used RM Compare to assess both year groups (120 children) together. He says, “The crossover of literacy attainment was an eyeopener. For the first time we were able to show that at least 10 children in Year 3 attained in the top 25% of children in Year 4; this helped our conversations with teachers to radically rethink the provision for these children in class.” As educators move towards evidence-based practice, technology is therefore being used to give them the edge. As a result, teachers are making better decisions and able to intervene quickly to improve learning outcomes.

Integrity in HE

Of course, at university level, integrity remains a focus. With the rise of the internet has come an increase in contract cheating whereby students pay for people to create work they later submit as their own, so institutions have to work hard to ensure that the student submitting the work is honest about their contribution. They do this by using the Turnitin plagiarism detection service and increasingly by promoting academic integrity more widely. But with all this intelligent technology to hand, will there come a time when educators’ roles in conducting assessment is actually minimal? Sir Anthony Seldon, vice-chancellor of the University of Buckingham, believes so. Seldon says that once authorship is established, the main concerns are that tutor comments are “formative, constructive, personalised and useful for the students’ further learning, and that staff time is not excessively taken in this process.”

But he claims that artificial intelligence “is a complete game changer on all three fronts because the AI technology will know the student intimately, it will detect at once when the work submitted is not the students’ own, it will be able to give details, personalised and constructive feedback tailored to optimise the learning by each individual student, and it will eliminate almost totally the need for academic and administrative staff to give their own hard-pressed time to assessments.”

If learners are getting this kind of feedback, there can be no doubt that their study time will be spent more purposefully.

But perhaps the most exciting consequence is how teachers and lecturers might use their new-found time to create an even richer experience for their learners.


Pros and cons of technology-enabled assessment (TEA), from the University of Reading

Pros

Improves authenticity and alignment with learning outcomes

Helps to clarify marking criteria

Spreads the assessment load for staff and students

Improves student engagement and promotes deeper learning

Cons

Finances and staff time

Accessibility issues

Large-scale introduction requires a significant level of institutional buy-in

Sense of isolation

Source: https://www.reading.ac.uk/engageinassessment/using-technology/eia-pros-and-cons-of-using-technology.aspx


You might also like: Empowering universities with digital assessment [post_title] => Putting assessment to the test [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => putting-assessment-to-the-test [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-04 12:27:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-04 12:27:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=19221 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19435 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-11-11 10:48:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-11 10:48:37 [post_content] => The Schools & Academies Show is back again this year to deliver one of the largest education events in the UK. Over the two-day event, taking place on 13–14 November at the NEC in Birmingham, we will present senior government speakers and association leaders from across the sector, as well as 50 hours of free CPD-certified seminar content for those at the forefront of education. Our leading free-to-attend*, two-day education policy and best practice event is designed to support school business management for school and MAT leaders, headteachers, heads of department, business managers, network managers, facilities managers and specialised procurement managers. This is a key event in the calendar for our attendees to receive industry-tested practical advice, guidance, solutions as well as the opportunity to:
  • Meet over 200 leading education suppliers, innovators and solution providers,
  • Attend our live hot seat and ask questions to the experts, whilst getting involved in debates about the future,
  • Network with government officials discussing key policy updates, trends and issues in the new and improved government education village,
  • Join peers from across the country in CPD-certified theatres, all chaired and delivered by school experts,
  • Find products & services for school improvement, with innovations that have helped schools to deliver outstanding education,
  • Share best practice with colleagues from all types of schools, academies and the wider sector in the networking zones,
  • Take part in the brand-new MATs matchmaking area (MAT leaders, governors and SLTs),
  • Attend one of our free wellbeing sessions on the show floor, discuss wellbeing and put yoga and mindfulness into practice.

The National School Awards

On 13 November, we’ll be presenting The National Schools Awards. The ceremony will consist of six awards, all designed to recognise and reward individual school leaders and schools in the UK for their fantastic work across the sector. Submissions are accepted up until the 27 September. You will be able to find a description of the awards and each category here.

MATs matchmaking area

This year the Schools & Academies Show Birmingham has launched a brand-new feature called the MATs matchmaking area. This new area was developed due to an increase in the number of Multi-Academy Trusts in the UK and a surge in the number of attendees from Multi-Academy Trusts. The MAT Matchmaking Area will feature a wide range of intimate roundtable discussion groups around key areas that are affecting MATs. View the full timetable here. [caption id="attachment_19440" align="alignnone" width="790"]schools-and-academies-show-2019 Hear from leaders across the education sector, from SLTs to senior government speakers[/caption]

Wellbeing demonstration area

This dedicated area on the exhibition floor will showcase a range of classes, mini-presentations, demonstrations and talks aimed at senior school and education leaders with the purpose of tackling the growing mental health crisis and wider pupil health issues within the education sector. These classes will be free to attend for visitors and we encourage all school, college and university professionals to take part and understand the benefits of taking mindfulness, yoga and wellbeing techniques back to their institutions. Click here to view the full timetable.

The charity village

The Schools & Academies Show is delighted to announce this new feature. The charity village will provide registered charities with an opportunity to take part in the exhibition floor and network with all the headteachers, school business managers, governors, finance directors, deputy heads and wider education leaders who attend the show.

Government education village

The government education village is designed as a drop-in centre where our visitors can interact with experts from across the Department for Education and the Education & Skills Funding Agency. We will have a variety of teams from the DfE and ESFA ready to provide you with practical advice, policy updates, interactive demonstrations and short presentations on a variety of topics. Click here to visit the website Click here to register for the two-day event *The Schools and Academies Show is a free-to-attend event for all professionals working within the education sector only. [post_title] => Network with senior leaders and access free CPD at the Schools and Academies Show [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => network-with-senior-leaders-and-access-free-cpd-at-the-schools-and-academies-show [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-11 10:48:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-11 10:48:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=19435 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18082 [post_author] => 83 [post_date] => 2019-09-27 12:27:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-27 11:27:11 [post_content] =>

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Entrusted with protecting the data of nearly 30,000 users, the University of Leicester requires a robust backup infrastructure. However, with the backup system it had in place, the loss of a single media server would have resulted in a total lack of access to backup data or restores – potentially for weeks – while the IT team acquired and installed new hardware. Recognizing that the university needed a better solution, the team decided to deploy Cloudian’s HyperStore S3-compatible object storage system as the foundation of a revamped backup platform.

Why Cloudian object storage software?

A key objective was finding a solution that would allow the index data to be moved from the media servers to a robust, fault tolerant, shared storage environment. That same environment would also serve as the backup target. The team at the University of Leicester explored various object storage software but ultimately settled on Cloudian.
“With Cloudian, I liked that I could try it in a VM and install it myself on my laptop in 15 minutes. It gave us confidence that we could easily manage the Cloudian system.” Mark Penny, systems specialist, University of Leicester

Benefits of object storage

  • Availability, with protection from media server loss or site failure
  • Simplified backup process
  • 50% space savings
  • Average 25% saving in data storage costs
  • Proven compatible with Commvault
  • S3-compatible storage, with potential for multiple use cases
  • Software-defined-storage solution, compatible with HPE Apollo servers.

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  3. Optional FREE 30-minute consultation with an expert for those of you that want to discuss your setup and help work out the best solution for your institution
 

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[post_title] => Find out how the University of Leicester plan to save 25% in data storage costs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => find-out-how-the-university-of-leicester-hope-to-save-25-in-data-storage-costs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-07 15:03:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-07 15:03:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=18082 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18148 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-09-26 00:00:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-25 23:00:26 [post_content] =>

The Schools and Academies Show is back again this year to deliver one of the largest education events in the UK. Over the two-day event, taking place on 13–14 November at the NEC in Birmingham, we will present senior government speakers and association leaders from across the sector, as well as 50 hours of free CPD-certified seminar content for those at the forefront of education.

Our leading free-to-attend* two-day education policy and best practice event is designed to support head teachers and principals, heads of IT departments, ICT managers, business managers and network managers.

This is a key event in the calendar for our attendees to receive industry-tested practical advice, guidance and  solutions as well as the opportunity to:

Meet over 200 leading education suppliers, innovators and solution providers;

Attend our live Hot Seat and ask questions to the experts, whilst getting involved in debates about the future;

Network with government officials discussing key policy updates, trends and issues in the new and improved Government Education Village;

Join peers from across the country in CPD-certified theatres, all chaired and delivered by school experts;

Find products and services for school improvement, with innovations that have helped schools to deliver outstanding education;

Share best practice with colleagues from all types of schools, academies and the wider sector in the networking zones;

Take part in the brand-new MATs Matchmaking Area (MAT Leaders, governors and SLTs);

Attend one of our free wellbeing sessions on the show floor, discuss wellbeing and put yoga and mindfulness into practice.

The National School Awards

On 13 November, we’ll be presenting The National Schools Awards. The ceremony will be consisting of six awards, all designed to recognise and reward individual school leaders and schools in the UK for their fantastic work across the sector. Submissions are accepted up until 27 September.

You will be able to find a description of the awards and each category here: www.schoolsandacademiesshowbirmingham.co.uk/awards

MATs Matchmaking Area

This year the Schools & Academies Show Birmingham has launched a brand-new feature called the MATs Matchmaking Area. This new area was developed due to an increase in the number of Multi-Academy Trusts in the UK and a surge in the number of attendees from Multi-Academy Trusts. The MAT Matchmaking Area will feature a wide range of intimate roundtable discussion groups around key areas that are affecting MATs. View the full timetable here: www.schoolsandacademiesshowbirmingham.co.uk/mat-matchmaking-area

Wellbeing Demonstration Area

This dedicated area on the exhibition floor will showcase a range of classes, mini-presentations, demonstrations and talks aimed at senior school and education leaders with the purpose of tackling the growing mental health crisis and wider pupil health issues within the education sector.

These classes will be free to attend for visitors and we encourage all school, college and university professionals to take part and understand the benefits of taking mindfulness, yoga and wellbeing techniques back to their institutions. View the full timetable here: www.schoolsandacademiesshowbirmingham.co.uk/the-wellbeing-demonstration-area

The Charity Village

The Schools & Academies Show is delighted to announce a new feature to be included at our next event taking place on 13 and 14 November at the NEC in Birmingham.

The Charity Village will provide registered charities with an opportunity to take part in the exhibition floor and network with all the headteachers, school business managers, governors, finance directors, deputy heads and wider education leaders who attend the show. www.schoolsandacademiesshowbirmingham.co.uk/the-charity-village

Government Education Village

The Government Education Village is designed as a drop-in centre where our visitors can interact with experts from across the Department for Education and the Education & Skills Funding Agency.

We will have a variety of teams from the DfE and ESFA ready to provide you with practical advice, policy updates, interactive demonstrations and short presentations on a variety of topics.


To find out more, visit: www.schoolsandacademiesshowbirmingham.co.uk

*The Schools and Academies Show is a free-to-attend event for all professionals working within the education sector only.

[post_title] => Schools and Academies Show returns to Birmingham for 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => schools-and-academies-show-returns-to-birmingham-for-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-19 14:21:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-19 13:21:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=18148 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17952 [post_author] => 74 [post_date] => 2019-09-16 14:56:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-16 13:56:25 [post_content] => Are you looking to use VR at your school but you don't want to invest thousands in your own headsets? PrimeVR offers virtual reality experience days from as little as £1.99* per pupil. Choose from over 20 different topics, ranging from Ancient Egypt to Outer Space and Inside the Body. Each workshop comes with a follow up literacy lesson plan that teachers can use to inspire creative writing. Since starting in 2017, PrimeVR has worked with over 500 schools across the UK. Check out their 5* reviews on Google, Trustpilot and Facebook. No expensive investment. No risk of technology becoming outdated. Completely hassle-free. Looking for something new for your next topic? Get in touch at www.primevr.co.uk. *Based on eight classes of 30 pupils taking part throughout the day. [post_title] => The UK's leading VR workshop provider [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-uks-leading-vr-workshop-provider [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-16 14:56:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-16 13:56:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=17952 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17864 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-09-13 08:49:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-13 07:49:42 [post_content] => The Data Literacy Project has released results of a survey* this week highlighting the preference for practical skills over academic qualifications in data. The survey was commissioned by data and analytics firm Qlik, a key partner in the Data Literacy Project, and covers attitudes from global business decision makers.

Related news: £8m Digital Futures at Work Research Centre to open in January


Almost two-thirds (59%) of global enterprises surveyed identified prior job experience or case study interview – where a candidate is presented with a business problem they must solve – as the top indicator of the candidate’s data literacy. Only 18% viewed a bachelor’s or even master’s or doctorate as a primary consideration when hiring.
What we look for are people who are curious and inquisitive, have a passion for doing the right thing, and are open to using data to find insights that support better business outcomes. – Lee Raybould, Nationwide Building Society
Recruitment site Glassdoor identified a similar trend in 2018, finding that an increasing amount of tech companies were giving more weight to practical data skills over official qualifications. Lee Raybould, chief data officer at Nationwide Building Society, said: “What we look for are people who are curious and inquisitive, have a passion for doing the right thing, and are open to using data to find insights that support better business outcomes.

Related news: Open Knowledge Foundation challenges government on data skills


“The volume and variety of data is constantly growing, and the insight it can unlock to allow firms to be more successful is incredible, but you need people who are prepared to engage with data, and to gain an understanding of how to use and interpret it to support decision making no matter what their job role.” *The responses came from 604 business decision makers from global publicly traded companies with at least 500 employees, and which represented a wide range of industries including banking and financial services, manufacturing, retail, transportation, healthcare, energy, construction, utilities, and communications. There were 200 respondents in the US, 200 in Europe, and 204 in Asia. [post_title] => Employers want practical data skills over data science degrees [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => employers-want-practical-data-skills-over-data-science-degrees [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-13 08:49:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-13 07:49:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=17864 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17347 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-08-21 00:00:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-20 23:00:28 [post_content] =>

What is a T-level?

A T-level is the new format that the government has developed for technical education. They have been the subject of discussion for many years but will officially be launched in England in September 2020. T-levels are an equivalent to A-levels, and include a three-month placement. They can be taken in the following subject areas:
  • Accountancy
  • Agriculture, land management and production
  • Animal care and management
  • Building services engineering
  • Catering
  • Craft and design
  • Cultural heritage and visitor attractions
  • Design, development and control
  • Design, surveying and planning
  • Digital business services
  • Digital production, design and development
  • Digital support and services
  • Education
  • Financial
  • Hair, beauty and aesthetics
  • Health
  • Healthcare science
  • Human resources
  • Legal
  • Maintenance, installation and repair
  • Management and administration
  • Manufacturing and process
  • Media, broadcast and production
  • Onsite construction
  • Science
The first three T-levels will be available in England from September 2020, in:
  • Digital production, design and development
  • Design, surveying and planning
  • Education
View this video for info on T-levels from the DfE

What does a T-level Certificate include?

A T-level certificate will include:
  • An overall grade for the T-level, shown as pass, merit, distinction or distinction*;
  • A separate grade for the core component, using A* to E;
  • A separate grade for each occupational specialism studied, shown as pass, merit or distinction;
  • Confirmation that the minimum requirements for maths and English qualifications have been met;
  • Confirmation that the industry placement has been successfully completed;
  • Confirmation that any additional mandatory requirements have been met.
Students who pass all elements of their T-level will receive an overall grade of pass, merit, distinction or distinction*. This overall grade will be worked out from the grades they achieved on the core component, and on the occupational specialism(s). If students study more than one occupational specialism, an aggregate grade across these will be used. A T-level distinction* is only awarded to students who achieve an A* in their core component, as well as a distinction in their occupational specialism. All other T-level requirements must also be met. Those who don’t pass all elements of their T-level will receive a T-level Statement of Achievement as opposed to a T-level Certificate. This will show what elements have been studied, but will not include an overall grade.

Can I get into university with T levels?

Yes. Although they are primarily designed to provide a direct route into skilled employment, T-level students also have the option to progress to higher education, an apprenticeship, or higher technical training. The DfE’s policy update states that “the size and rigour of a T-level programme is comparable to a three-A-level programme. Therefore, T-levels will attract Ucas points in line with those allocated to three A-levels.”

How many Ucas points is a T-level worth?

Ucas tariff points T-level overall grade A-level equivalent
168 Distinction* A*A*A*
144 Distinction AAA
120 Merit BBB
96 Pass (C or above on core) CCC
72 Pass (D or E on core) DDD
  However, although the T-level programme is approximately the same size as a three-A-level programme, the qualifications have different purposes. T-levels are intended to help students develop skills and knowledge required for skilled employment, therefore measuring different abilities than A-levels, and using different grading scales. The standards of attainment for the technical qualification component within each T Level programme will be approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (the Institute) and regulated by Ofqual. The DfE's policy update paper can be viewed in full here. [post_title] => T-level update: Ucas points revealed [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => t-level-update-ucas-points-revealed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-21 08:14:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-21 07:14:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=17347 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17256 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-08-15 10:36:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-15 09:36:05 [post_content] =>

Colin Bannister, EMEA VP and head of presales, VMware

Technical qualifications are no longer the only the avenue to a career in technology.
“We’ve seen years of campaigning to encourage students to study STEM related subjects, which is commendable – to a point. These are valuable qualifications, but incentivisation efforts must be carried out with the understanding that technical qualifications are no longer the only the avenue to a career in technology. “In fact, the tech sector in the UK is as vibrant because of the diversity of expertise and backgrounds of its employees. Today you can find countless successful individuals in the biggest tech companies across the country – including myself – who didn’t study STEM subjects beyond A-level, and bring a variety of different skills to the table. “Why? The industry is developing with such speed that many of the tech skills learnt from studying STEM subjects are likely to become outdated in the space of a few years. It’s soft skills, therefore, that are vital. That’s why when we recruit, tech skills are just one of the dozen or so criteria we look at. We look for an ability to collaborate and function in teams, build relationships and empathise with the people around you in order to succeed. Technology businesses like ours need this variety of skillsets across the organisation to remain competitive. “So whatever their results, this year’s students should be encouraged. The door to a career in the tech sector remains firmly open for those determined to enter.”

Carol Holden, VP of human resources, Software AG

There are plenty of opportunities for our graduates to go on and thrive – we just need to ensure they have the right skills to work with data.
“A-level results day may mark the end of an era – but it’s the start of a new journey too. “The uptake in STEM grades signals that as students complete their education for the last time, they are becoming more aware of the potential that these kinds of skills have to aid them in a successful future career. “However, more needs to be done. While STEM skills are important in being able to extract and analyse the data, we want to future proof our workforce by ensuring employees are able to become more creative in their interpretation of the data and that new innovations stem out of our abilities to discover new ideas. By putting data into the hands of the many, employees will have the ability and freedom to derive meaningful information from complex analytical data and reduce an organisation’s reliance on armies of data scientists. “With Gartner reports shedding light on the need for data and analytics leaders to encourage a data-literate organisational culture that values information as an asset – we must remember that this training begins in schools. “There are plenty of opportunities for our graduates to go on and thrive – we just need to ensure they have the right skills to work with data.”

Shahid Younis, CEO, Datawhizz Academy

Irrespective of the subjects that students choose to focus on in their GCSEs or A-Levels, being data literate will be key to understanding how people and machines intersect now and in the future.
“Young students nowadays face lot of uncertainty when it comes to preparing for future world of employment. Having to decide at an early age as to which subjects to study in order to prepare for jobs that may not even exist when they finish school or graduate, can be an impossible task. In addition, there is a lot of conflicting advice out there. “Should we encourage students to hone their softer skills to remain employable over robots that lack the necessary empathetic traits of humans? Or should we try to plug the current skills shortage of machine learning and data science experts given the rapid developments taking place in automation, artificial intelligence and robotics? “This question is especially imperative for future generations if you consider that young people are already almost three times more likely to be unemployed than adults, and the education system as it stands is unable to adequately prepare them for this new generation of work. Qlik’s recent Global Data Literacy Report found that of those 16–24-year-olds already in work, 52% are overwhelmed by the data they must read and analyse as part of their job. “Irrespective of the subjects that students choose to focus on in their GCSEs or A-levels, being data literate will be key to understanding how people and machines intersect now and in the future. I firmly believe that learning is a continuous process and am encouraged by companies like Qlik, which established Data Literacy Project as well as running partnerships with universities and schools globally to empower students in harnessing the power of data and analytics in their own learning environments.”

James Eiloart, senior vice president of EMEA, Tableau Software

Each year, the UK is short of 40,000 science, technology, engineering and math’s (STEM) graduates.

“While the government places digital skills at the core of its Industrial Strategy, a widening disconnect is emerging between the current educational system and the demands of the modern workplace.

“Much is still being made of the need to increase the number of students pursuing STEM subjects such as maths and computer science. Each year, the UK is short of 40,000 science, technology, engineering and math’s (STEM) graduates, but the challenge of equipping young people to thrive in tomorrow’s digital economy goes far deeper than simply offering more courses in these subjects.  We should be broadening our definition of what “technical skills” means by looking at what is actually needed in the workforce and inserting those skills into the broader curriculum.

“For example, skills like analytical reasoning, data science and business analysis are currently amongst the top 25 most in-demand skills for today’s workforce – these skills will be crucial for young people as they enter tomorrow’s workplace, whatever career path they choose. The ability to analyse and communicate back insights from data is emerging as a core competency every worker should possess. Rather than hiving these skills off into a handful of subjects, we should look holistically at how skills like data literacy can be embedded into teaching in the same way reading and writing are integral across all subjects today.

“The Royal Society’s Curriculum Review, published last year, makes a compelling case for incorporating data science into primary and secondary education across a broad range of data rich subjects such as history and geography.”

Sean Farrington, SVP EMEIA, Pluralsight

If we want to keep pace with the world’s elite on emerging technologies such as AI and 5G, we must encourage more young people, and in particular girls, to consider technology careers.
“Over the last year, the UK government has ramped up its efforts to encourage STEM development and learning in our schools. It has invested millions in teacher training through subject bursaries, urged technology companies to partner with schools as part of a £10m edtech fund and this spring committed to an extra £200m to support developments in the STEM industry. “With this year's results showing that STEM subject uptake is at 41%, with computing growing by 8%, and those achieving A* to C grades in computing reaching 63%, it’s great to see a return on investment and positive engagement in these subjects which will help keep the UK at the forefront of innovation for years to come. “That being said, there’s still so much more to be done. Deloitte found this year that just 18% of business leaders believe that those leaving school have the right digital skills and experience for the workforce. If we want to keep pace with the world’s elite on emerging technologies such as AI and 5G, we must encourage more young people, and in particular girls, to consider technology careers. Just 13% of those taking computing A-level this year were female. A diverse and dynamic workforce is proven essential for greater innovation and creativity, hiring and retaining the best talent and better company performance. “Of course, an increase in young people studying STEM A-levels is not indicative of them following into an IT career, but it does demonstrate that attitudes towards these industries are changing and individuals are finally realising the potential they can offer, which can only be a good thing for our country. But once graduates enter the workforce the hard work isn’t over. Employers need to continually invest in technology skill development of their workforce to keep them and the country moving forward.” [post_title] => What they said: A-level results day edition [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-they-said-a-level-results-day-edition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 12:54:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 11:54:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=17256 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17045 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-08-13 00:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-12 23:00:53 [post_content] => It’s no secret that video is everywhere in today’s world, with the average eight–18-year-old consuming 6–9 hours of digital media each day and 71% of three–18-year-olds accessing and using the internet at home*. But did you know that according to research (Kaltura 2018), 70% of educators use video in the classroom multiple times per week?  With 92% of students and 83% of teachers reporting that videos have a positive impact on their classroom experiences, there’s no denying that videos are being used for teaching more than ever in today’s classrooms. If you would like to utilise the benefits that video can bring to the classroom and are considering using the platform within lessons, video-assisted learning is for you. But what exactly is video-assisted learning, and what impact can it have on the teaching experience and the educational outcomes for students? Why is video-assisted learning important? Video-assisted learning is the process of acquiring defined knowledge, competence and skills with the intelligent use of audio-visual aids as instructional resources, and it has a number of benefits for teaching and learning: ● It produces better cognitive and effective learning outcomes.  ● It enables educators to experiment with digital learning tools.  ● It saves time and raises students’ interest given their proficiency with technology and appetite for online video consumption. ● It increases the retention of knowledge and stimulates understanding and aptitude.  ● It accommodates different learning styles as well as the need to foster creative and critical problem-solving skills.  ● It provides a standardised way of conveying information that can be viewed several times at any moment and from any place where video-enabled devices and internet access are available. [caption id="attachment_17047" align="alignnone" width="790"] myViewBoard Clips allows educators to access more than 2 million licensed educational videos to enhance video-assisted learning[/caption] ViewSonic’s total solutions to education – ViewBoard + myViewBoard ViewSonic is an education solution provider which integrates the interactive flat panel ViewBoard with software solutions myViewBoard and myViewBoard Classroom for educators.  The pioneering system operates on an open-source philosophy and supports Google Classroom and Microsoft Education integration. It also includes a complementary file conversion function, allowing legacy files of major interactive flat-panel brands to be shared across different solution platforms. This determination to empower educators has created a new ‘open’ edtech ecosystem founded on the principles of ‘prepare, present, participate’, and has solidified ViewSonic as leaders in the next generation of edtech resources. ViewSonic’s current education solution already supports video learning through: ● Easily importable multimedia Dragging your cloud-stored videos and YouTube videos onto the board is possible, and hosts are able to capture and record screen images and annotations in the middle of a discussion. Even the most out-of-the-box ideas can be expressed in full with a variety of writing, drawing and multimedia tools. Easily recording and saving of video files to integrated cloud space The embedded cloud integration panels include Google Drive, One Drive and Dropbox. Challenges to video-assisted learning Although video use appears to be an ideal addition to the classroom, there are challenges and concerns around how teachers obtain video content. ● Concerns about time Teachers, who are notoriously time-poor and over-burdened with demands, spend considerable time finding videos to suit their students’ needs, both for use in the classroom and as homework assignments. ● Concerns about trustworthy content Teachers tend to prefer content obtained from sources based on peer assessments and recommendations. Although colleague recommendations can be hugely valuable to the individual teacher, such recommendations may not always reach a large proportion of the teacher community. ● Concerns about safety As online safety becomes a greater concern in education, many educational institutions are restricting access to publicly accessible video platforms, thereby limiting the resources teachers have available to them. Technology could provide a solution to these issues.  myViewBoard Clips – access to over two million educationally relevant videos To solve the current video-assisted learning challenges, ViewSonic has recently partnered with educational video content company Boclips. ViewSonic created a new video-streaming tool, myViewBoard Clips, that allows teachers access to over two million educationally relevant videos to support their learning objectives and easily incorporate them into their lectures and other activities, free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions. The new learning tool contains supplementary content from Boclips’ library of over 150 trusted and renowned media partners, including TED, PBS Newshour and Bloomberg, as well as teacher favourites like Crash Course, Minute Earth and LearnZillion. With educational videos available in different formats and suitable for all age levels, myViewBoard Clips content is suitable for curriculums across the world. Access to these materials will give educators the freedom to create interactive and engaging lessons directly on the myViewBoard canvas.  Recognising the demand from teachers for a rich and relevant in-classroom video repository that is free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions, this partnership helps to greatly reduce teachers’ workload and also enhance student engagement. Through the new educational video-streaming feature myViewBoard Clips, teachers will be able to find video content to support their learning objectives and easily incorporate it into their lectures and other activities, free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions. ViewSonic solution - the video-assisted learning platform ViewSonic’s solution, equipped with whiteboard environment in hardware and software, is an ideal platform for video-assisted learning, providing rich annotation tools and a sleek writing experience for learning. On ViewSonic’s digital whiteboard platform, educators can access a plethora of safe and relevant video content on top of the already well-established tools. For example, after accessing the videos, educators can explain and elaborate more clearly through adding texts, graphs, photos, diagrams, tables, illustrations, documents, browsers, apps and more beside videos on one canvas.
To learn more about ViewSonic and its products and solutions, visit: www.viewsonic.com/education [post_title] => Make learning more effective and engaging with video-assisted classrooms [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => make-learning-more-effective-and-engaging-with-video-assisted-classrooms [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-08 10:53:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-08 09:53:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=17045 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17110 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-08-12 00:00:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-11 23:00:01 [post_content] => The first in our series, Steve Wright speaks to Osi Ejiofor, Educator and EdTech 50 judge/founder of Osi’s Tech Tips website. Q. As schools, colleges and universities across the country ready themselves for the new academic year, what are their main edtech focuses? Institutions are in different places when it comes to technology implementation. Some schools, colleges or universities are beginning to embed technology in their offering, whereas others have an established approach towards the usage.  The focus for those schools beginning this journey would be on implementing an approach based on the success of other, more established institutions – yet tailored to their own particular setting and student needs, especially with younger pupils.  Studies from the US analysing data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the 2017 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) show “little evidence of a positive relationship between student performance on PISA and their self-reported use of technology, and some evidence of a negative impact”. [Link on page 36*.]  This doesn’t show that technology has no positive impact on performance: instead, it’s more a reflection of how technology is used in classrooms. We need to focus on tech that redefines learning and affects outcomes – rather than tech for the sake of it.  Q. What are educators most concerned about in terms of back of house/administrative/non-teaching tasks? Time is a commodity much sought after by education professionals. One of the biggest concerns for teachers is the amount of time they spend on administrative tasks that do not directly improve classroom outcomes, or which could be made more efficient through the use of technology. Assessment tasks such as marking, data entry, data analysis, report writing, test marking, risk assessment and performance monitoring; administrative tasks such as lesson planning, registering students, parent communication, staff briefing, staff training: these can all take too much time, or could be streamlined using technology. However, most institutions stick to what is most comfortable, rather than most effective. It is difficult for practitioners to transition from knowing much (although inefficient) to knowing little: even if the latter saves time and improves productivity, people would rather stay in their comfort zone. Providing the right training and development for staff is essential to ensure a smooth transition to a new system. However, in most cases teachers are trapped in a time vortex in which the systems are dated and inefficient. Some blame lack of funding, others blame the pressure to produce results: but the end result is that teachers are spending too much time on administrative tasks. Q. What edtech skills are teachers keen to focus on for 2019–20? There is a steady, swelling movement away from an ‘instructionist’ towards a ‘constructionist’ approach in teaching. Resources such as Lego Mindstorm, Scratch, Minecraft, Raspberry Pi, and Makey Makey have been leading the way in creating a hands-on approach towards learning through technology.  This approach is beginning to spread across the curriculum, and resources such as Google’s Applied Digital Skills are making it more accessible for practitioners. This resource is helping teachers to become lesson facilitators, and encouraging students to take a more self-paced, hands-on, collaborative approach to learning.  The UK platform has a growing bank of resources and lessons for teachers to draw from, with more being added as we speak. The US has double the amount of these lessons, and its bank is also growing. Q. Which edtech products and services are garnering most excitement? A number of products are generating excitement. Alongside Google’s Applied Digital Skills resource, Microsoft OneNote and other Office applications have really changed the way teachers plan and conduct lessons. The new features of OneNote enable students not only to make jottings as they would on paper, but also to have calculations explained to them when their answer is incorrect: they are given the correct answer with an explanation and given the chance to try another one. This saves teachers time when dealing with misconceptions.  Products that save teachers time will always be most attractive. Socrative, Google Forms, NearPod and others cut down on some of the administrative and assessment tasks that teachers have to carry out. What could be more exciting than that? Q. What edtech topics are at the top of the agenda right now? Assessment is definitely a hot topic. The success of education is shown in the progress and development of the student. Senior leaders want to know what services can ensure that they are assessing in the most efficient, accurate way possible.  This has led to many schools adopting tools such as Google Forms and other self-marking online questionnaires/quizzes to reduce teacher marking time, allowing teachers to focus on analysing progress and targeting areas for development. Tools such as Texthelp enable students to identify errors in their writing, and also to have the text read out to them –  excellent for students with English as an additional language or others who require additional reading support. Another hot topic is the effective use of support staff in classrooms, and the potential that AI could replace certain teaching assistant roles. It is never easy discussing the possibility of people losing their jobs to technology, but for teaching assistants this is something that is coming closer to home as school budgets in the UK continue to be cut. Q. Should we be looking to any other countries/systems for inspiration as we seek to get the best from the edtech out there? There are many examples of how technology is used throughout the world in ways that are both innovative and inspiring. The fluid learning approach from Orestad Gymnasium in Denmark aims to constantly test new ways of teaching (including virtual teaching) exemplified in the architecture as well as the curriculum. However, we need to be careful when looking elsewhere for effective tech-led teaching practices, as our use of technology is closely related to culture.  The needs of each culture drive the creation of technology. We now find that technology is able to influence cultural changes. With this in mind, we have to be careful not to assume that an approach that works in Silicon Valley will have the same effect in Brixton. It should also be mentioned that there is a wealth of good practice across the nation, as highlighted by the Education Foundation’s publication of its EdTech 50 Schools earlier this year.
Further reading Quizlet: www.quizlet.com Forbes magazine: Does Education Technology Help Students Learn? www.forbes.com/sites/helenleebouygues/2019/06/14/does-educational-technology-help-students-learn Jisc’s Janet Network: www.jisc.ac.uk/janet Imperial College Edtech Lab: www.imperial.ac.uk/business-school/programmes/global-mba/learning-experience/edtech-lab European EdTech Network: www.eetn.eu [post_title] => Roundtable - 19/20 edtech vision with Osi’s Tech Tips [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => roundtable-19-20-edtech-vision-with-osis-tech-tips [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-08 15:47:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-08 14:47:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=17110 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19221 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-11-19 00:00:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-19 00:00:50 [post_content] =>

Remember and regurgitate, or develop skills for life? Getting students to engage meaningfully with a school, college or university’s assessments can be a challenge. But technology can be a game changer, allowing educators to mirror what students might have to do in their working lives. Blogging is one such skill, and is increasingly popular as a method of assessment in universities. University of Edinburgh lecturers Nina Morris and Hazel Christie looked at how geology and geography students responded to blogging as part of their assessment, and noted that “the continuous nature of blogging compels students to engage more, not just in individual classes, but also across the course as a whole. As a result, students are more able to make connections between course themes and make evaluations based on a broader subject knowledge base.”  Meanwhile, they concluded that tutors were given a more personal insight into what their students were learning. In the further education and schools sectors, a similarly open-minded approach to learning outcomes has led many to experiment  with online tools like SeeSaw through which students can create drawings, voice recordings and videos to show what they know in the way that works best for them.

Saving teachers time

It’s clear that it’s not just the learners being assessed that benefit from technology, but also their educators. Haylie Taylor has 13 years’ teaching experience, a decade of which was spent in primary schools, and she reflected on the main challenges for teachers: the first one being finding assessments. After all the printing and queuing for photocopiers that is associated with traditional paper assignments, she says that the appeal of online teaching and learning tools like EducationCity, for whom she now works as a consultant, is that “all assessments for the core subjects can be housed in one place. They can be set in just a few clicks and students can simply login on a computer or tablet to complete the assessment.”

Secondly, she recalls the heavy marking load: “Marking one 20-question assessment for one student might take 15 minutes. However, marking a whole class worth of English and maths assessments can take a weekend, and that’s if you’re quick! Then comes the data collection and analysis – this can be very time-consuming and labour intensive, especially if your assessment and data platforms are separate and you have to transfer this information between the two.” Online systems often mark automatically, providing teachers with the data they need instantly ­– often presented in a simple visual report to help them identify gaps and misconceptions at a glance.

Finally, Taylor notes that lots of time can be spent on closing the final part of that feedback loop. She says: “After getting to grips with the data, I’d need to think about how I’m going to support my class with those gaps and misconceptions that have been identified. If I already have the resources, I need to re-teach or allow my students to practice, then great, but if not, more time will be needed to either source or create relevant, curriculum-linked resources.” This is a further area where technology can assist by providing a central hub, with assignments tagged to relevant content. She says: “In some cases, the curriculum content can even be assigned automatically based on assessment results, saving teachers a significant chunk of time.”


SPONSORED: Maintaining academic integrity with Urkund

By Neil Walker, senior account manager, Nordics

Technology has changed the way we do business, live our lives and interact as human beings. One part of that change can be observed in the classroom. Suddenly, mobile phones were omnipresent and information available a few taps away, presenting new challenges and opportunities. One of these new challenges was to handle the information overflow and the mere copy-pasting of sources, legitimate or not. According to recent studies, cheating went up a staggering 40% in the years between 2015–2018 at top UK universities.*

Which isn’t all that surprising. More and more universities and schools are opting for technical solutions such as Urkund, which ultimately leads to a higher hit rate of exposed academic misconduct. Instead of having educators scrolling endlessly through documents trying to single out sources, a fully automated system doing the work for them can be a true lifesaver. Besides the fact it saves time it also checks sources that are behind paywalls or were previously submitted by another student. Based on our experience, this is where 80% of all plagiarism can be found. A great upside is (and this is confirmed by teachers over and over again) that the pure fact of having a plagiarism checker at your institution helps prevent it. It enables a conversation around the topic, how to avoid it and why it is a danger to academic integrity.

*(https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/apr/29/cheating-at-top-uk-universities-soars-by-30-per-cent)


Collaboration between schools

In order to look afresh at these and other challenges, Church Cowley Saint James Church of England Primary School in Oxfordshire recently brought together 14 previously unlinked primary schools to work on assessing writing tasks by Year 6 children using technology called RM Compare. This shows teachers two anonymous pieces of work side-by-side on a screen, and the teacher judges which of those best meets the simplified assessment criteria. The system then uses an algorithm to intelligently select and pair similarly ranked work side-by-side. Headteacher Steve Dew says: “The main success of using the technology is the opportunity to collaborate with other schools on what good/great writing looks like. From that our teachers have a good idea of what good writing looks like from a sample of 415 children’s writing, and not just that within our school – this sort of information and analysis has not been available to us previously. This has had a positive impact on how we plan and teach lessons, has raised our bar of expectation and given us some great exemplar material to support the children’s understanding too.”

As Haylie Taylor indicated, the assessment cycle continues after a mark is decided, and can usefully inform educators on how to best teach a given cohort. Dew cites standards in years 3 and 4 as an example of this. He says that the school felt they had a handle on attainment within these classes – but there was a surprise to come when they used RM Compare to assess both year groups (120 children) together. He says, “The crossover of literacy attainment was an eyeopener. For the first time we were able to show that at least 10 children in Year 3 attained in the top 25% of children in Year 4; this helped our conversations with teachers to radically rethink the provision for these children in class.” As educators move towards evidence-based practice, technology is therefore being used to give them the edge. As a result, teachers are making better decisions and able to intervene quickly to improve learning outcomes.

Integrity in HE

Of course, at university level, integrity remains a focus. With the rise of the internet has come an increase in contract cheating whereby students pay for people to create work they later submit as their own, so institutions have to work hard to ensure that the student submitting the work is honest about their contribution. They do this by using the Turnitin plagiarism detection service and increasingly by promoting academic integrity more widely. But with all this intelligent technology to hand, will there come a time when educators’ roles in conducting assessment is actually minimal? Sir Anthony Seldon, vice-chancellor of the University of Buckingham, believes so. Seldon says that once authorship is established, the main concerns are that tutor comments are “formative, constructive, personalised and useful for the students’ further learning, and that staff time is not excessively taken in this process.”

But he claims that artificial intelligence “is a complete game changer on all three fronts because the AI technology will know the student intimately, it will detect at once when the work submitted is not the students’ own, it will be able to give details, personalised and constructive feedback tailored to optimise the learning by each individual student, and it will eliminate almost totally the need for academic and administrative staff to give their own hard-pressed time to assessments.”

If learners are getting this kind of feedback, there can be no doubt that their study time will be spent more purposefully.

But perhaps the most exciting consequence is how teachers and lecturers might use their new-found time to create an even richer experience for their learners.


Pros and cons of technology-enabled assessment (TEA), from the University of Reading

Pros

Improves authenticity and alignment with learning outcomes

Helps to clarify marking criteria

Spreads the assessment load for staff and students

Improves student engagement and promotes deeper learning

Cons

Finances and staff time

Accessibility issues

Large-scale introduction requires a significant level of institutional buy-in

Sense of isolation

Source: https://www.reading.ac.uk/engageinassessment/using-technology/eia-pros-and-cons-of-using-technology.aspx


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