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Childnet competition to 'create a better internet'

The national competition asks young people to create their own films to be used as educational resources across the UK, encouraging online safety

Posted by Charley Rogers | July 23, 2018 | Events

Leading online safety charity Childnet have announced the winners of the ninth annual Childnet Film Competition. Representatives from government, industry, charities and wider attended the event alongside the competition finalists at the British Film Institute (BFI).  

Each year the Childnet Film Competition invites schools and youth organisations from across the UK to capture their internet safety messages in a short film. The two winning schools and four finalists will see their films used as internet safety resources to educate other young people about how to ‘Connect with respect’ and inspire others to use the internet positively and safely.

Childnet Film Competition reaches more young people than ever before

With over 200 entries across both the primary and secondary categories, young people created a variety of films ranging from animations and dramas to raps and silent films.  

The winners of this year’s Film Competition were Trinity Church of England School in the primary category with their film Footprints. In the secondary category the winners were The Ferrers School with their film Game Over.  

This year BBC Own It will also showcase the finalists’ films, providing a unique opportunity for the young people to reach even more of their peers with their online safety messages.

The films that these young people have created will be invaluable in spreading online safety messages across the UK. – Will Gardner, CEO, Childnet

Will Gardner, CEO of Childnet, said:“We know from our work in schools that peer-led education can be hugely impactful, and the films that these young people have created will be invaluable in spreading online safety messages across the UK. This year’s Childnet Film Competition was bigger than ever before, with almost 1,000 young people getting involved, making films and sharing positive messages about online safety. The standard of entries this year has been exceptionally high and it’s clear to us that these young people are really passionate about making the internet a better place for all.” 

The Minister for Digital and Creative Industries, Margot James, who attended and spoke at the event said: “We want the UK to be the safest place in the world to be online and are bringing in new laws to make that happen. It's incredibly inspiring to see young people using their creativity through the Childnet Film Competition, highlighting how we all need to work together to make the online world a more respectful and pleasant place to be." 

The Childnet Film Competition was founded in 2010 and is delivered as part of Childnet’s work in the UK Safer Internet Centre. The competition aims to harness the positive role of peer-to-peer education and provide a creative and inclusive approach to empower and inspire young people aged 7-18 to use technology safely, positively and creatively.

Judged by a panel of experts

The films were judged by Lisa Prime Children’s Events Programmer at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), Catherine McAllister Head of Safeguarding and Child Protection BBC Children’s, David Austin OBE Chief Executive at the BBFC, and Joanna van der Meer Film Tutor and Family Learning Programmer at BFI Southbank.

The winning films from the Childnet Film Competition can be viewed here.

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