ET June is online now

The evolution of 3D printing for SEND students, why arts and STEM are better together, and what ‘21st-century skills’ actually means…

When it comes to education in the UK, a traditional subject-based layout is what generally comes to mind. However, as times are changing, so are approaches, and a more interdisciplinary, skills-based attitude is coming into vogue.


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The STEAM movement is a large part of this interdisciplinary approach, and in our roundtable this month we quiz four edtech experts on what benefits arts education brings to more technical subjects and vice versa. Check out what they said on page 33.

3D printing has also played a large part in STEAM. Now that it’s well-established in many educational settings, we take a look at what’s new, and in particular how this technology can be leveraged to aid SEND students in their learning. You can read about what we found out on page 47.

As focus shifts to Industry 4.0, and what the future of work might look like, there is also a lot of attention being paid to the skills required for this unknown eventuality. But what exactly do we mean when we say ‘21st-century skills’, and is education preparing today’s students for the world of tomorrow? We investigate on page 51.

One of the skills that is having its moment right now is coding. The OECD’s education chief Andreas Schleicher said recently that teaching coding is a “waste of time”, understandably throwing up all sorts of discussions. We take a look at the edtech world’s reaction to this contentious opinion, and the place that coding has in wider education, in The Report on page 41.

Our timeline this month focuses on an element of STEAM education that has certainly had its time in the limelight. From text-based adventure games to sophisticated educational apps, we take a look at the history of gamification. See our illustrated timeline on pages 56–57.

We were also lucky enough this month to speak to the CBO of a Next Billion Edtech Prize-winning business, Tanzanian edutainment company Ubongo. Hear what Doreen Kessy has to say about the state of education in Africa and how making learning fun is helping address the crisis, on page 59.

We are of course also still bringing you a roundup of all the latest news in the UK and beyond, as well as an interesting selection of opinion pieces on varying aspects of edtech. You might also notice a new feature this month, entitled ‘What they said’. We’ve sourced a selection of comments on the DCMS’ Online Harms white paper, and the impact it will have on the education and tech sectors. See what four experts have to say on page 30.

All this and lots more inside the mag.

Thanks for reading.

Yours,

Charley Rogers

Editor

Education Technology