New OU report predicts brain-to-brain learning by 2070

A new report marks the 50th anniversary of the Open University with bold predictions on the future of learning

A new report from the Open University (OU) predicts brain-to-brain learning will be realised by 2070.

The Future of Learning 2070: Imagine What’s Next report marks the 50th anniversary of OU with bold predictions on what technology could mean for the next generation of learners.

Mary Kellett, vice-chancellor of OU, said: “Technology continues to revolutionise the way we learn, from anticipating the needs of learners through AI, to technology platforms that open up learning to everyone.

“At The Open University we have always been at the forefront of innovation, with some of the future’s brightest minds leading the way. We’re incredibly excited for a future where new technologies help widen participation and make education open to all.”

The report makes four predictions for edtech in the next 50 years which take in to account developments in artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR) and brain-to-brain learning.

Technology continues to revolutionise the way we learn, from anticipating the needs of learners through AI, to technology platforms that open up learning to everyone.
– Mary Kellett, OU

The predictions are:

AI coaching

AI could help coach students, and support teachers, by understanding how individuals study, learn and live.

Full-sensory virtual learning

Virtual learning could replace face-to-face learning allowing students and educators to connect virtually as avatars. It could allow people to coach one another from around the world.

Brain-to-brain learning

Devices could allow information (even complex and abstract concepts) to be transmitted from brain to brain.

VR 2.0

Virtual reality will become so immersive that kinaesthetic learning will become possible, with computers stimulating all five senses.

The full report can be downloaded at 50.open.ac.uk/futureoflearning

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