Two-thirds of kids turn to internet not parents for help with homework

The majority of UK parents said they had to use the internet to help answer questions about homework

Two-thirds of parents say their kids prefer to turn to the internet for help with their homework, a survey suggests.

Parents say that their children were more likely to look a difficult question up online than approach them with it.

Sixty-two per cent also admitted they had turned to the internet to answer questions from their children about homework.

The survey of 15,000 people was conducted for Lenovo and included nine countries.

Many parents regularly report feeling unequipped to help their children with aspects of study beyond moral support and emotional encouragement to achieve in school.
– Jocelyn Brewer, founder of Digital Nutrition

The internet was a more popular option for children in every country surveyed, which included the US, Mexico, Brazil, China, India, Japan, France and Germany. Those in Germany were most likely to seek their parents’ assistance and children in India the most likely to turn to the internet.


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Parents said they needed the internet most to help their children with STEM homework. More than 70% thought the internet was risk to their child’s memory and social skills, but two-thirds thought technology would aid generations “to be more independent learners and problem solvers”.

Jocelyn Brewer, psychologist and founder of Digital Nutrition, said: “Not only has much of the curriculum taught across the globe been revamped and updated in recent decades, but pedagogy and ways of learning have shifted as well. Many parents regularly report feeling unequipped to help their children with aspects of study beyond moral support and emotional encouragement to achieve in school.”