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By Pete Hannah, Director of UK and Ireland, NETGEAR 

The tech revolution is at an all-time high with many networks reaching a mission-critical state, particularly within the education sector. The educational sector’s IT landscape has drastically changed over the past 10 years. Previously confined to a few desktop PCs found in the reception and library, now, staff and pupils demand instant connectivity throughout the school across a plethora of devices. We are living in the era of the connected classroom. From interactive whiteboards to individual tablets, the traditional classroom has been transformed into a technological paradise.

Educational establishments already appreciate that they must embrace technology in order to enhance learning. Whilst many admit to this, technology often remains low on the priority list, particularly when it comes to budget allocation. For example, a school might be on the verge of enhancing the WiFi network to cope with increasing pressures, but then the mini bus breaks down and has to be replaced. In this case, it is likely that the WiFi infrastructure plans will be put on hold to free up the budget elsewhere.  

Filling the knowledge gap

The issue of prioritisation in budget lies in understanding the need and benefit of investing in a technologically enhanced classroom. A prime example of this is how academics have recently argued the important influence artificial intelligence may one day have upon one-to-one tutoring for children. With it not only having the potential capability to improve students’ learning, but also to monitor their well-being[1]. 

The issue of prioritisation in budget lies in understanding the need and benefit of investing in a technologically enhanced classroom

Whilst there is still some way to go for the education sector in achieving a full understanding and appreciation of technology in learning, educational establishments need to urgently address the pressure upon its aging legacy networks. This is only set to increase, particularly with the advent of BYOD, meaning the number of students now bringing their own devices onto the premises has increased tenfold. It is, therefore, inevitable that the pressure on the network continues to increase in tandem with the headache of ensuring learning can continue without lag.

Future-proofing school networks

Network infrastructure needs to evolve alongside the technology that is brought into the classroom now, and have the flexibility to sustain the tech that may not be considered, such as CCTV, interactive whiteboards and connected learning tools.  

In order for schools to develop in line with the digital revolution and keep teachers one step ahead of tech-savvy students, all education establishments must ensure time and money is invested into developing and understanding the needs to future-proof networks.

For schools to make that first step in addressing the inevitable network issue, whilst embracing and coping with the tech-enabled learning environment, here are some best practise tips:

1. Hire a dedicated IT expert to analyse your network. Checking for pressures on the current infrastructure, whilst considering future requirements and the budget involved. 

2. Investing now in agile infrastructure is imperative to preventing unexpected cost or failure in connectivity in the near and distant future. By addressing this immediately, schools are able to avoid the infrastructure reaching mission-critical status. 

3. In order to future-proof IT systems within an educational environment, resilient networks and secure back-up systems must be a top priority. With the network often experiencing extreme peaks and troughs in usage, it must be able to cope with high demand and avoid bottle necks. If not, the entire schools network could go down and without a secure back-up system, all documents and data could be lost.

In reality, the idea of a fully connected classroom may be some way off for many schools. However, by investing resource into understanding and addressing the existing pressures on the network, all schools can future-proof their infrastructure and embrace the digital revolution with ease. After all, it’s all about learning for the future. 

[1] https://www.pressreader.com/uk/the-independent/20160229/281908772224628
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Digital data has become central to all our lives, with schools and colleges now storing the majority of their information in bytes instead of boxes. Many of us blissfully assume that the data we store electronically will be eternally safe. However, everyday occurrences such as accidental file deletion, an overnight water pipe breakage or an accidentally spilt hot drink on a piece of hardware can cause untold disruption if data is not properly stored and backed up. 

Given the unprecedented growth and reliance on digital data, coupled with the increasingly stringent regulations for the education industry to adhere to, it is key for educational establishments to understand the complex issue of storage and the variety of solutions available to ensure core data and processes remain safe – regardless of what’s thrown at them.

So, how can they ensure they remain protected against traditional threats but also the more silent forms of data corruption? There are simply five layers of data protection that schools and colleges need to consider: 

1.) Data should be written across multiple drives for RAID protection to protect against the inevitable risk of hardware disk failure.

2.) Data should be automatically protected against the phenomenon of bit rot, where data is actually corrupted at the very lowest level – the bits. This slow deterioration in the integrity of data stored on storage media can result in anything from pixel errors in JPEGs to a corrupted database of exam results.

3.) Data should be continuously protected during normal day-to-day operations, allowing for easy restoration of data from virtually any point in time. Snapshot technology provides point-in-time recovery when a disaster strikes or files are deleted.

4.) Data must be secured adequately in real-time against viruses and malware through up-to-date security solutions; not only at the firewall but also on the storage device itself in case someone brings malware stored on a USB drive straight into the classroom.

5.) A second copy of data – and operating system images etc. – should always be stored at a secure offsite location for disaster recovery. In today’s world this is most elegantly and cost-effectively achieved with a sophisticated and automated replication solution, but could also be via a USB drive, traditional tape or backup in the cloud.

In today’s ever connected environment, data is growing exponentially. One school we work with, Bishop Heber High School in Cheshire, was keen to embrace new ways for teachers to make lessons more engaging and informative. However, as presentations were becoming more multimedia-based, storage of these large files (some up to 50MB each) was putting a huge strain on the existing data storage system.

The resilience of the storage was also a cause for concern in the ICT department; with no back-up in place should servers (and disks) fail. After a site survey, we implemented a solution to provide more than enough capacity to safely and securely meet the school’s needs now and in the future. Back-ups are now happening more quickly and files are able to be restored with ease if accidentally deleted, without having to go through the back-up software.  

The more layers of protection a school employs, the less of a risk they face. Yet historically most storage solutions typically address only two or three of the layers outlined above. This, coupled with the fact that many schools and colleges simply don’t have the time or resources to dedicate to complicated backup and recovery processes, leaves them exposed to potentially catastrophic outcomes.  

'Many school’s IT administrators are still either not aware of the five layers of data protection or presume they are only available within expensive and complex solutions'

Many school’s IT administrators are still either not aware of the five layers of data protection or presume they are only available within expensive and complex solutions. However, a lot has happened in storage technology and there are now affordable solutions available that fit the bill by adhering to the five layers of data protection. Now, even if disaster should strike, schools and colleges can have peace of mind the impact on their operation and reputation will be minimal. 

NETGEAR is offering Education Technology readers a FREE, no obligation on-site networking survey, assessing storage, wireless and network needs, aiming to solve network issues or improve your infrastructure.

If you are interested in having a free networking survey at your site, please contact us at sitesurveys-uk@netgear.com, visit www.netgear.co.uk/networksurvey or give us a call on 01344 458200.

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The new generation of students

Recent research from YouGov shows that some 81% of tech savvy UK 13-18 year olds own their own smartphone, with 34% also owning a tablet[1]. The learning curve is steep too, with the research uncovering that almost three quarters (70%) of children are confident in using mobile devices by the time they begin primary school.

The proliferation of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) in schools has led to a debate about how much BYOD use should be encouraged. In my view, as the old adage says, if you can’t beat them, join them. Trying to control smartphone and tablet use in the classroom is tantamount to swimming against the tide.

The days of the teacher standing up at the front of the class and dictating notes for students to take without a modicum of interaction has long gone. The recent experiment at Bohunt School in Hampshire that was turned into a hit BBC TV series[2] bore that out. Now, teachers have far more flexibility of how they present the national curriculum to students. In fact, why even stay within the confines of the classroom?

The argument for a flexible BYOD policy

One such forward thinking school that we work with is Ballard School on the edge of the New Forest national park. It implemented a relatively flexible BYOD policy as felt it was important that staff and pupils could work with the tools they need and prefer. It firmly believes that pupils are more likely to be creative with their own familiar, cared-for tablet or laptop. In an environment where innovation and creativity are actively encouraged this is vital. As David Horton, ICT manager at the school so eloquently puts it: “You wouldn’t expect to prescribe which brush an artist uses to paint or which instrument a musician uses to compose, so why wouldn’t it be better to allow students to learn on a device of their choice?”

'Trying to control smartphone and tablet use in the classroom is tantamount to swimming against the tide'

With an open BYOD policy in place, Horton and his team at Ballard School understood that to facilitate this new breed of learning it needed an infrastructure that could fully support BYOD, as any sudden rise in people logging on to the WiFi with multiple devices would have a knock-on effect across the IT network. It spent time to research the number of devices likely to be used and in what part of the school, and then designed its infrastructure around it.

The watchword for modern learning is accessibility. This translates as ensuring staff and pupils alike are able to access the content that will assist in their learning whether they are in the classroom or even the playing fields. At Ballard School it is not uncommon for PE teachers to film the student’s tennis strokes or dance routines in one part of the school then instantly review the footage during the continuation of the lesson in the comfort of the classroom.

Being an inspiration

The prevalence of BYOD and the increasing robustness of WiFi technologies have enabled teachers to engage with students on a level that inspires them the most, how the classroom of the future will truly look may remain open to conjecture but what can’t be argued is that technology will remain at the core.

NETGEAR is offering Education Technology readers a FREE, no obligation on-site networking survey, assessing wireless and storage needs, aiming to solve network issues or improve your infrastructure.

If you are interested in having a free networking survey at your site, please contact us at sitesurveys-uk@netgear.com, visit www.netgear.co.uk/networksurvey or give us a call on 01344 458200.

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The IT landscape in schools and colleges has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. Once confined to a few desktop PCs in the reception and library, staff and pupils alike now demand instant connectivity throughout the school across a plethora of devices.

However, many schools and colleges have yet to make the leap to a fully connected environment, often constrained by concerns around increased IT support and inflexible network structures. Yet, in reality there’s never been a better time for them to embrace a fully connected environment to benefit both staff and students. 

At the same time, as the number of devices connected to the network continues to increase, so do the headaches associated with managing these devices and the network infrastructure. Many schools are burdened by an eclectic mix of network ports of varying speeds and density at the access layer that is often compounded with a not very capable core. Thus, many operate three-tier networks, or even more, which are not only difficult to manage and leverage, but upgrades are difficult and maintenance is costly. 

With both the number of devices and power and networking infrastructure requirements showing no sign of slowing down, building a flexible infrastructure that time-sapped managers won’t need to rip and replace in a matter of months is key.

The move towards network flexibility is not as daunting as previously considered. Chassis-based network design was historically only the playground for large enterprises due to the high capital expenditure required. However, the emergence of flexible networking systems is set to revolutionise how schools can deploy high performance, highly resilient, fully redundant and future proofed switched networks from the Core to the Edge.

'A dependable network design that is based on the concept of ‘Network Yoga’ mandates an architecture that can both scale as a network grows and be flexible enough to provide support for ever faster server and storage connections needs.' 

This flexible approach to networking is not just cost-effective, but imperative in improving network resilience and availability too. The alternative, traditional ‘rip and replace’ practice associated with inflexible networks can result in a period of uncertain downtime. Flexible chassis-based network designs ensure the entire network remains operational, even when network improvements are being made.

One NETGEAR customer to benefit from the change is Birkenhead Sixth Form College. The college actively encourages students to use their own devices. However, with more than 1,500 devices and counting, many of which would simultaneously log on at peak times (such as the start of lessons), the college’s network was placed under significant pressure.

With IT being a key component of everyday college life, it was important the network could keep pace with the users’ growing demands. This, coupled with the addition of new buildings requiring connectivity, prompted a review of the existing network infrastructure.

While the college’s existing infrastructure was seen to offer a good network backbone, it did not provide the required resilience, speed, performance and capacity to support increasing demand. By upgrading its entire infrastructure at the core to facilitate a 10GbE environment, the bandwidth capacity has quadrupled. Staff and students at Birkenhead now have a fast, resilient network which can not only provide essential support to key services running across it, but grow with future demands and ensure that BYOD remains an integral part of both teaching and learning.

A dependable network design that is based on the concept of ‘Network Yoga’ mandates an architecture that can both scale as a network grows and be flexible enough to provide support for ever faster server and storage connections needs. As schools produce and consume more data, it’s time to let go of the traditional restricted infrastructure, and embrace a flexible network infrastructure that can ensure their networks are able to support the demands of not just today, but the next generation’s too.

The demand for affordable and efficient technology has never been greater. Schools and colleges face unique challenges, such as extensive grounds, multiple buildings and numerous users that change annually. With the BYOD trend growing increasingly more popular, it’s more important to have a reliable and efficient IT infrastructure in place – can your network support these issues? 

Tris Simmons, Senior Product Marketing Manager at NETGEAR.

NETGEAR is offering Education Technology readers a FREE, no obligation on-site networking survey, assessing wireless and storage needs, aiming to solve network issues or improve the infrastructure. If you are interested in having a free networking survey at your site, please contact us at sitesurveys-uk@netgear.com, go to www.netgear.co.uk/networksurvey or give us a call on +44(0) 1344 458200.

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By Pete Hannah, Director of UK and Ireland, NETGEAR 

The tech revolution is at an all-time high with many networks reaching a mission-critical state, particularly within the education sector. The educational sector’s IT landscape has drastically changed over the past 10 years. Previously confined to a few desktop PCs found in the reception and library, now, staff and pupils demand instant connectivity throughout the school across a plethora of devices. We are living in the era of the connected classroom. From interactive whiteboards to individual tablets, the traditional classroom has been transformed into a technological paradise.

Educational establishments already appreciate that they must embrace technology in order to enhance learning. Whilst many admit to this, technology often remains low on the priority list, particularly when it comes to budget allocation. For example, a school might be on the verge of enhancing the WiFi network to cope with increasing pressures, but then the mini bus breaks down and has to be replaced. In this case, it is likely that the WiFi infrastructure plans will be put on hold to free up the budget elsewhere.  

Filling the knowledge gap

The issue of prioritisation in budget lies in understanding the need and benefit of investing in a technologically enhanced classroom. A prime example of this is how academics have recently argued the important influence artificial intelligence may one day have upon one-to-one tutoring for children. With it not only having the potential capability to improve students’ learning, but also to monitor their well-being[1]. 

The issue of prioritisation in budget lies in understanding the need and benefit of investing in a technologically enhanced classroom

Whilst there is still some way to go for the education sector in achieving a full understanding and appreciation of technology in learning, educational establishments need to urgently address the pressure upon its aging legacy networks. This is only set to increase, particularly with the advent of BYOD, meaning the number of students now bringing their own devices onto the premises has increased tenfold. It is, therefore, inevitable that the pressure on the network continues to increase in tandem with the headache of ensuring learning can continue without lag.

Future-proofing school networks

Network infrastructure needs to evolve alongside the technology that is brought into the classroom now, and have the flexibility to sustain the tech that may not be considered, such as CCTV, interactive whiteboards and connected learning tools.  

In order for schools to develop in line with the digital revolution and keep teachers one step ahead of tech-savvy students, all education establishments must ensure time and money is invested into developing and understanding the needs to future-proof networks.

For schools to make that first step in addressing the inevitable network issue, whilst embracing and coping with the tech-enabled learning environment, here are some best practise tips:

1. Hire a dedicated IT expert to analyse your network. Checking for pressures on the current infrastructure, whilst considering future requirements and the budget involved. 

2. Investing now in agile infrastructure is imperative to preventing unexpected cost or failure in connectivity in the near and distant future. By addressing this immediately, schools are able to avoid the infrastructure reaching mission-critical status. 

3. In order to future-proof IT systems within an educational environment, resilient networks and secure back-up systems must be a top priority. With the network often experiencing extreme peaks and troughs in usage, it must be able to cope with high demand and avoid bottle necks. If not, the entire schools network could go down and without a secure back-up system, all documents and data could be lost.

In reality, the idea of a fully connected classroom may be some way off for many schools. However, by investing resource into understanding and addressing the existing pressures on the network, all schools can future-proof their infrastructure and embrace the digital revolution with ease. After all, it’s all about learning for the future. 

[1] https://www.pressreader.com/uk/the-independent/20160229/281908772224628
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Welcome to the New School of Wireless.
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