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OR ( mt2.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND mt2.meta_value = '0' ) ) AND ( mt3.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt4.meta_key = 'protected' AND mt4.meta_value = '0' ) ) ) ) AND ehetposts.post_type IN ('articles', 'blog') AND ((ehetposts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY ehetposts.ID ORDER BY ehetposts.menu_order, ehetposts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16163 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-07-12 08:56:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-12 07:56:31 [post_content] => More so than ever, in recent years the focus on attainment and ‘teaching to the test’ has resulted in creative subjects being pushed to the peripheries of the education curriculum. A recent proposal by Ofsted, however, which looks at broadening the curriculum and inspecting the way lessons are delivered, has the potential to introduce these subjects back into the classroom and encourage pupils to embrace their creative flair. One teacher who has long been an advocate for creativity within lessons, especially with music, is Glenn Carter. Year 5 teacher and history lead at Ingleby Mill Primary School, Glenn shares his experience and expertise on how best to engage students within music lessons by using education technology. Here he shares his personal, tried and tested insights:

Memorable learning experiences

Despite the educational funding crisis and workload pressures that you read about in the headlines, us teachers want to help inspire and educate the future generation. The first thing about engaging students, particularly primary school students, is creating memorable and enjoyable lessons. Teaching music can be a difficult task, and it’s important to find new and exciting ways to inspire the children to think about music on a wider scale and incorporate creativity and imagination into the core subjects. Using a Promethean ActivPanel as a focal point within the classroom, I regularly create songs and melodies with the help of my class to aid the children in remembering important information or difficult topics.
The first thing about engaging students, particularly primary school students, is creating memorable and enjoyable lessons.

Using YouTube for educational purposes

Most children these days are used to using an iPad or tablet device, and almost every child in the technological age has used YouTube and considers it a luxury. Taking this mentality and using it as a lesson tool is an extremely beneficial way to find new ways of teaching and engaging students, without it feeling like a lesson to them. Within lessons, I regularly use YouTube to play music videos and songs to the students in an effort to encourage them to take an interest in music and hopefully spark a passion for performing.

Expand the school’s instrumental provision

Understandably, schools do not necessarily have the budget to purchase a vast array of musical instruments. Fortunately, an investment in education technology can help to bypass this issue. In lessons, we use a synthesizer app on our ActivPanel which allows pupils to layer the sounds of a range of instruments. MusicStudio and MusicStudioLite are great ways to allow the children to manipulate music without being gifted with instruments. This can help to help to introduce students an array of different instruments that would be otherwise unavailable in the school, as well as encourage students to create, layer and ultimately produce a piece of music. [caption id="attachment_16166" align="alignnone" width="790"]music-lesson-glenn-carter-activpanel-promethean The ActivPanel allows children to engage with different instruments without having to purchase them individually[/caption]

Collaborating Composition

As the common saying goes, ‘teamwork makes the dream work’, and that is very much the stance I take when engaging music students. Children enjoy working together and a music lesson is the perfect opportunity to encourage classroom collaboration, the sharing of ideas and peer-assessment. Using ActivCast, which comes as standard on the ActivPanel, students can create music on their tablet devices or laptops and cast to the ActivPanel to encourage a class discussion. Alternatively, apps such as the keyboard are readily available and when used on the ActivPanel, its simultaneous touch points enable several children to play the instrument at once.

Inspire

There are a range of free apps and software available that can allow students to create music using professional studio-standard software. Even students who are not musically gifted in the traditional sense can be involved in music lessons as producers and gain an in-depth understanding of music creation and production. It is important to inspire students to engage with music and to use it as an opportunity to be as creative as they wish.
Children enjoy working together and a music lesson is the perfect opportunity to encourage classroom collaboration.
Education technology has the potential to transform the classroom environment and can help to inspire students to take an interest in subjects that are usually pushed to the edges of the curriculum. By embracing edtech, it can help to make instruments that would be otherwise inaccessible, accessible, as well as helping to engage students to take an interest in music and inspire the next generation of students in the creative arts. In celebration of teaching and learning, this term, Promethean has launched a competition for teachers to share their stories to encapsulate memorable teaching moments, and be in with the chance of winning one of five ActivPanels. #ClassroomStory will return in the new academic year. For more information on how to enter the competition next term, please visit www.classroomstory.co.uk [post_title] => Top tips to engage primary pupils in music lessons [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => top-tips-to-engage-primary-pupils-in-music-lessons [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-12 08:56:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-12 07:56:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=16163 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15796 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2019-06-24 08:06:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-24 07:06:17 [post_content] => In an effort to celebrate all things good about teaching, Promethean recently launched the #ClassroomStory competition, giving educators the chance to win a state-of-the-art ActivPanel by sharing inspiring teacher memories with the education community. Following the negative headlines about extensive teacher workloads and what’s being called the ‘crisis in education’, Promethean wanted to help teachers recognise the wonderful work that they do, the impact they have on the lives of students, and to relive cherished educator memories. As #ClassroomStory is getting into full swing, and entries are coming in thick and fast, Promethean shares the story so far:

Once upon a time – Dan’s story

#ClassroomStory was piloted at Bett 2019, and teachers were encouraged to come forward and share warm teacher memories with the incentive of winning an ActivPanel that could not only help integrate technology into the classroom, but assist with collaborative teaching and learning methods. Dan Rolles, network manager at Shielding Special Education Trust, told Promethean about a young boy named Brandon. Brandon was passionate about technology and as a result of one-on-one sessions and inspiration from his teacher, has now completed an ICT degree and is working for the ICT department of a large bank.
Technology has the ability to transform the teaching environment, creating a versatile and engaging sphere to help students and teachers to learn and develop in adaptive classrooms.
Following the encouragement he received from his teacher in his teen years, Brandon thanked Dan for the support in his university acceptance speech, stating that without the additional help and guidance he feels that he would never have pursued a career in ICT, something which Dan was incredibly pleased to share.

Turning teacher memories into edtech

Technology has the ability to transform the teaching environment, creating a versatile and engaging sphere to help students and teachers to learn and develop in adaptive classrooms, and help to familiarise students with technology from a young age. Technology also has the ability to help teachers create and experiment with new and exciting ways to teach, therefore encouraging students to engage with lessons and spark creative energy. Despite the potential technology has for our future learners, budgets can be restrictive, and many schools are unable to break down the barriers to access this technology. Promethean, with the help of the #ClassroomStory competition, has made the potential of benefiting from this technology possible. The award-winning ActivPanel has become a popular tool in classrooms around the world, and it could be yours just by sharing magical teaching moments that transformed the way you feel about teaching. Enter the #ClassroomStory competition today by sharing a video entry on social media, to be in with the chance of winning an ActivPanel package valued at approximately £3,000, all for the love of learning. To find out more about #ClassroomStory and how to enter, please visit www.classroomstory.co.uk [post_title] => The story so far: Promethean’s #ClassroomStory [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-story-so-far-prometheans-classroomstory [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-24 12:24:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-24 11:24:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=15796 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15014 [post_author] => 74 [post_date] => 2019-05-09 11:18:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-09 10:18:07 [post_content] => Stories about workload, wellbeing and record numbers of teachers leaving the profession are dominating the headlines in the UK, in what some are calling a ‘crisis in education’. Whilst the challenges educators are facing urgently need addressing, it is also important to recognise some of the amazing work teachers are doing and the impact they are making to the lives of their students. For the love of learning, this term, Promethean has launched the #ClassroomStory competition to share treasured teaching memories and give educators the chance to win a state-of-the-art technology package. Over the past two years, the Promethean Grant has celebrated schools around the UK, with pupils taking the limelight in the creative video competition which saw over 60 ActivPanels awarded to winning schools. This time around, in 2019, Promethean wants to hear from you, the teachers, in the all new #ClassroomStory competition. Do you remember a time when a pupil came to you after class for extra help? When a pupil excelled because of your support? The best piece of advice a colleague has given you? If you have a story to tell, Promethean would love to hear from you and share your story with the teaching community. The #ClassroomStory competition was previewed at leading education technology show Bett, in London in January. Promethean created a video booth where for the duration of the show, educators came and told their stories to be in with the chance of winning an ActivPanel, an advanced interactive front of class display. Some really inspirational and heart-warming stories were captured – but one story in particular stood out to judges. Promethean-classroom Dan’s #ClassroomStory Dan Rolles, network manager at Shieling Special Education Trust, shared his story that encompassed the ethos that every member of staff in a school has a valuable role to play, and that teaching and learning has a long lasting impact on pupils and their career prospects. Dan told Promethean about a child named Brandon who would frequently come to his office to ask ICT-related questions and had a real passion for technology. At the time, technology was still an emerging trend in schools and was seen as a fairly ‘nerdy’ subject, but this did not phase Brandon, and Dan encouraged him to learn more about ICT. Recently, Dan bumped into Brandon and discovered that he is now working for the ICT department of a large bank. Brandon thanked Dan for the support he had given him in school and said he had inspired him on to pursue a career in ICT. Sharing your #ClassroomStory If you, or a colleague have a special teaching memory, then why not share it as a video and celebrate what is positive in education? Promethean wants to know all about those magical teaching moments that really give you a sense of fulfilment. Share your video on social media using the hashtag #ClassroomStory. The most inspirational stories will be shortlisted, and educators will be in with a chance of winning one of five ActivPanel packages valued at approximately £3,000. The shortlisted stories will then go to a public vote in June. For more information on how to enter the #ClassroomStory competition, visit www.classroomstory.co.uk or email ClassroomStory@PrometheanWorld.com [post_title] => Promethean launches #ClassroomStory competition [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => promethean-launches-classroomstory-competition [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-09 11:18:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-09 10:18:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=15014 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13786 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-03-08 00:00:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-08 00:00:38 [post_content] => Could Moscow be leading the way in education innovation? Education and pedagogy are at the forefront of the minds of not only teachers and parents, but also governments around the world. Education makes up the building blocks of a country by creating the workforces of tomorrow and governments are naturally looking for ways to raise standards and improve learning provisions. Technology has become an integral part of modern learning practices as a way of enhancing engagement and facilitating the best student outcomes and career prospects. In Russia, in a first of its kind, a recent project by the department of education set out to transform the edtech offering of Moscow schools. An overhaul of classroom technology on a large scale The Moscow Online School project is the single largest project of the digitalisation of education in the world, with 980,000 students and 65,000 teachers participating. The initiative aims to use all the advantages of modern digital technologies to convert classrooms into high-tech spaces, media centres, workshops and scientific laboratories with super-fast internet speeds, modern devices and a single point of data storage. In support of Moscow’s Smart City initiative, global education technology provider Promethean has developed a bespoke Irbis panel to meet the exact needs of Moscow’s teachers. Promethean’s wealth of experience in the design and manufacturing of edtech solutions put the company in the perfect position to develop a panel with specially customised features and a tailored user experience.
In order to strive for improvements in education, there is potential to learn from other countries worldwide, where new strategies, technologies and innovations are being developed
The Irbis panel offers a tablet-like interface with a customisable home screen so teachers and students alike can use a set up that suits them most. Convenient for administrators and managers, the solution will be integrated with the infrastructure of the Moscow Online School, providing on-hand management and online monitoring.  By the end of the project, the Promethean Irbis interactive display will have been installed in approximately 21,600 classrooms. Recognising the value in traditional teaching practices While the department for education in Moscow is pioneering large-scale improvements to edtech provisions across schools, it has also given a nod to traditional teaching practices. Research has suggested that there is positive correlation between the skills learned in chess and attainment across wider subjects, leading Moscow to introduce weekly chess lessons as a compulsory part of the primary school curriculum. To coincide with the addition of chess to the curriculum, Promethean partnered with Russian Chess Grandmaster Sergey Karjakin, to run the Promethean Grandmaster Challenge in Russia. Having learned to play chess at the age of five, Sergey Karjakin holds the record for the world’s youngest-ever chess grandmaster, having qualified for the title at the age of 12. The competition set out to encourage teachers to find innovative ways of teaching chess using technology to deliver inspiring lessons. The winning teacher won a trip to education technology show Bett in London, with chess grandmaster Sergey Karjakin and Promethean, to deliver a series of presentations on the benefits of chess in education. At the show the subject of the pedagogical benefits of chess captured the interest of visitors and delegations alike, posing the question whether chess should have a more prominent place in British education. Promethean is committed to sharing best practice in education and opening thought-provoking dialogues with pedagogy at the core. In order to strive for improvements in education, there is potential to learn from other countries worldwide, where new strategies, technologies and innovations are being developed. In Russia, though the Moscow Online School project places an emphasis on tech, the introduction of chess into the curriculum makes the initiative exemplary of how traditional education best practices can be blended with the capabilities of modern learning technologies. [post_title] => Chess meets tech in Russian schools [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chess-meets-tech-in-russian-schools [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-07 14:41:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-07 14:41:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=13786 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13200 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-20 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-20 00:00:00 [post_content] => Rachel Ashmore, teaching and learning consultant, Promethean joins the discussion Q. Is there a new genre of technology (e.g. the recent focus on VR and AI) that is currently taking over, or is likely to soon? Rachel Ashmore: AR and VR are hot topics in regard to technology at the moment but are unlikely to become mainstream in education anytime soon. VR, in particular, is quite specialised and there are limitations in how it can be used across the curriculum, in addition to funding challenges. Instead, we are seeing a positive growth in the number of schools updating their interactive whiteboards to panels. New front-of-class displays have far more intelligence and connectivity than their predecessors, with access to endless education resources and apps. We are also likely to see significant growth in online assessments in the next few years as they continue to develop, reducing the pressures of workload and placing the emphasis back on teaching. Q. How is edtech affecting pedagogy, and vice-versa? Rachel Ashmore: Pedagogy should always come first and edtech should fulfil a purpose in enhancing education practice. It is exciting to see how innovations in edtech are improving engagement in classrooms and helping to reduce the workload of teachers, though funding remains a significant challenge across the education sector. Q. Is there anything happening behind the scenes in edtech now, that will change how we view education in the next five years? Rachel Ashmore: There is a prominent caution around data protection and safeguarding of children with the continued growth of social media. We are seeing a surge of ‘digitally native’ children passing through schools where digital devices are second nature to them. Throughout the sector there is a nervousness around mobile phones and how much time should be spent using digital devices, but when we look at future employment prospects, children need to be increasingly digitally competent. The digital curriculum has seen some major advances, but I think we can expect to see some even larger strides in the next few years. Q. How can teachers keep up with the fast pace of tech? It’s notoriously lightning speed, whereas education lags in adopting change. Can we consolidate these two approaches? How? Rachel Ashmore: Educators need more time and training on new technologies, but in a sector where time is scarce and budgets are dwindling, this is no easy change. Despite lack of training it must be noted that educators are doing an excellent job in aiding their own development with new technologies and striving to utilise them to their utmost potential. For education technology providers there must be a commitment to providing basic training where possible and responsibly supporting schools with the implementation of edtech. The pace of change in which we are witnessing new innovations in edtech is not going to slow down. It is crucial that manufacturers carefully consider usability of products to allow edtech to make a valuable contribution to education. Technology must be intuitive for both teachers and pupils alike to use with ease. Easy adoption is pivotal to getting the most out of edtech and maximising its impact. Q. Technology can be a fantastic tool for schools and universities, but can also cause a lot of resistance in decision-makers if they don’t see the benefit. How can advocates get higher management and those that control the purse strings on board? Rachel Ashmore: Investment in technology should never just be for the sake of getting new tech. When looking for new technologies, advocates must have an agenda which identifies what they are looking to gain from the investment. Edtech must fulfil a purpose in areas such as improving engagement, raising standards or saving valuable time. By showing how edtech will support teachers and improve teaching and learning, you are far more likely to gain the support of senior leaders and fellow teachers. Q. Edtech suppliers often raise the issue that they don’t know how to break into the education market, and that the disparate nature of the sector means they don’t know where to start. What advice do you have for both providers and educators who would like to make connections? Rachel Ashmore: The prime focus should always be on knowing what challenge you have a solution for. Edtech suppliers need to make procurement and support as easy as possible in the education market where time to explore solutions can be limited. Q. Is there a time in history when technology has had such a huge impact on education? Do you think it will continue to do so, or can we expect a plateau at some point? Rachel Ashmore: In the UK, the period of government funding for interactive whiteboards was a huge stride in making classrooms digital. Interactive whiteboards made a big difference to planning. For the first time, teachers could prepare lessons on a desktop or laptop and easily project them onto boards at the front of the classroom. Internet connections in classrooms were also an important milestone in education, opening up the enormous and instrumental resource which is the world wide web. Internet connections were initially beneficial for research exercises and have quickly grown to support video assessment for a multitude of educational apps. Edtech will continue to enhance teaching and learning best practice but mostly through blended learning. We are likely to continue to see edtech used in conjunction with traditional learning resources rather than completely replacing them. [post_title] => Keeping up with edtech: Rachel Ashmore [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => roundtable-rachel-ashmore [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-02-13 14:54:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-02-13 14:54:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=articles&p=13200 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => articles [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7026 [post_author] => 74 [post_date] => 2018-12-18 00:00:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-12-18 00:00:21 [post_content] => To ensure you get the most out of the performance of your Interactive Flat Panel Display (IFPD), make sure you put the proper measures in place for regular maintenance. Promethean Technical Consultant and former Network Manager, Pete Millar, has provided his top-tips on how to protect your investment and keep your lessons running as smoothly as possible.
  1. Schedule regular software updates
Being in a busy school environment, it’s not always possible to run software updates when first prompted. In order to get the most out of apps and other resources, try to run updates every half term or at a minimum every term. This will ensure efficient running of the IFPD and that you have the most up-to-date software.
  1. Manage your data
We have all received the dreaded ‘storage full’ message on our computers and phones and have spent hours trawling through trying to delete files and uninstall apps that aren’t needed anymore. Top end IFPDs include the capacity to manage and store data, however like any digital storage device, failing to clean up data at regular intervals will negatively affect performance. You may want to initiate an ‘end of term clean-up’, where teachers or pupil digital leaders uninstall unused apps and remove files that are no longer required.
  1. Ensure anti-virus software is up-to-date
It’s crucial that school anti-virus software updates are completed to improve your security and smooth running of the IFPD, protecting systems and allowing you to benefit from the very best features available. Updates to software and apps contain all the latest features and security functions, make sure you have the vital security protection in place to safeguard against viruses which can affect the running of your panel.
  1. Hide the wires
In addition to providing a neater look around your panel, hiding away the cables and fitting them snugly out of reach will prevent them from becoming loose or being accidentally removed. Simple measures like this can leave you confident that the cables and points are secure.
  1. Keep it clean
One of the biggest mistakes people make is cleaning IFPDs with spray products. It is important that you look after the appearance of your panel, to ensure dust is removed and it is kept clean, but only by using a dry cloth. No spray products are to be used on the panel as it can hinder its performance and affect visuals on the screen. Hopefully with these tips in mind, you’ll be able to keep your IFPD performing at its very best and reduce the likelihood of running into any technical difficulties. W: prometheanworld.com/gb/ [post_title] => 5 tips on maintaining IFPDs – Promethean [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 5-tips-on-maintaining-ifpds-promethean [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-14 11:03:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-14 11:03:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=7026 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16163 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-07-12 08:56:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-12 07:56:31 [post_content] => More so than ever, in recent years the focus on attainment and ‘teaching to the test’ has resulted in creative subjects being pushed to the peripheries of the education curriculum. A recent proposal by Ofsted, however, which looks at broadening the curriculum and inspecting the way lessons are delivered, has the potential to introduce these subjects back into the classroom and encourage pupils to embrace their creative flair. One teacher who has long been an advocate for creativity within lessons, especially with music, is Glenn Carter. Year 5 teacher and history lead at Ingleby Mill Primary School, Glenn shares his experience and expertise on how best to engage students within music lessons by using education technology. Here he shares his personal, tried and tested insights:

Memorable learning experiences

Despite the educational funding crisis and workload pressures that you read about in the headlines, us teachers want to help inspire and educate the future generation. The first thing about engaging students, particularly primary school students, is creating memorable and enjoyable lessons. Teaching music can be a difficult task, and it’s important to find new and exciting ways to inspire the children to think about music on a wider scale and incorporate creativity and imagination into the core subjects. Using a Promethean ActivPanel as a focal point within the classroom, I regularly create songs and melodies with the help of my class to aid the children in remembering important information or difficult topics.
The first thing about engaging students, particularly primary school students, is creating memorable and enjoyable lessons.

Using YouTube for educational purposes

Most children these days are used to using an iPad or tablet device, and almost every child in the technological age has used YouTube and considers it a luxury. Taking this mentality and using it as a lesson tool is an extremely beneficial way to find new ways of teaching and engaging students, without it feeling like a lesson to them. Within lessons, I regularly use YouTube to play music videos and songs to the students in an effort to encourage them to take an interest in music and hopefully spark a passion for performing.

Expand the school’s instrumental provision

Understandably, schools do not necessarily have the budget to purchase a vast array of musical instruments. Fortunately, an investment in education technology can help to bypass this issue. In lessons, we use a synthesizer app on our ActivPanel which allows pupils to layer the sounds of a range of instruments. MusicStudio and MusicStudioLite are great ways to allow the children to manipulate music without being gifted with instruments. This can help to help to introduce students an array of different instruments that would be otherwise unavailable in the school, as well as encourage students to create, layer and ultimately produce a piece of music. [caption id="attachment_16166" align="alignnone" width="790"]music-lesson-glenn-carter-activpanel-promethean The ActivPanel allows children to engage with different instruments without having to purchase them individually[/caption]

Collaborating Composition

As the common saying goes, ‘teamwork makes the dream work’, and that is very much the stance I take when engaging music students. Children enjoy working together and a music lesson is the perfect opportunity to encourage classroom collaboration, the sharing of ideas and peer-assessment. Using ActivCast, which comes as standard on the ActivPanel, students can create music on their tablet devices or laptops and cast to the ActivPanel to encourage a class discussion. Alternatively, apps such as the keyboard are readily available and when used on the ActivPanel, its simultaneous touch points enable several children to play the instrument at once.

Inspire

There are a range of free apps and software available that can allow students to create music using professional studio-standard software. Even students who are not musically gifted in the traditional sense can be involved in music lessons as producers and gain an in-depth understanding of music creation and production. It is important to inspire students to engage with music and to use it as an opportunity to be as creative as they wish.
Children enjoy working together and a music lesson is the perfect opportunity to encourage classroom collaboration.
Education technology has the potential to transform the classroom environment and can help to inspire students to take an interest in subjects that are usually pushed to the edges of the curriculum. By embracing edtech, it can help to make instruments that would be otherwise inaccessible, accessible, as well as helping to engage students to take an interest in music and inspire the next generation of students in the creative arts. In celebration of teaching and learning, this term, Promethean has launched a competition for teachers to share their stories to encapsulate memorable teaching moments, and be in with the chance of winning one of five ActivPanels. #ClassroomStory will return in the new academic year. For more information on how to enter the competition next term, please visit www.classroomstory.co.uk [post_title] => Top tips to engage primary pupils in music lessons [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => top-tips-to-engage-primary-pupils-in-music-lessons [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-12 08:56:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-12 07:56:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=16163 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => blog [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 6 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => de3da7215471dbec4502cd4b24052894 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

Promethean

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About us

With more than 20 years of experience in K-12 classrooms, Promethean is a global leader in education technology. Promethean’s combined hardware and software solutions are designed to transform learning spaces into collaborative and connective environments, promote student participation and engagement throughout the learning process, and provide access to limitless interactive teaching and learning resources that bring lessons to life. Promethean is a member of the NetDragon Websoft Holdings Limited group of companies and its corporate headquarters office is located in Seattle, USA, with additional offices in Blackburn, UK and Atlanta, USA.

Promethean’s Global reach:

  • 1 million classrooms with Promethean Interactive displays
  • 4 million+ teachers, parents and students registered on ClassFlow® worldwide
  • 50,000+ schools and institutions in 154 countries using Promethean solutions

THE WORLD OF IMMERSIVE LEARNING

For more than 20 years, learning has fuelled the technology innovation behind Promethean. At Promethean, our goal is to reimagine and reinvent educational technology solutions to create the dynamic environments, communities, and tools that:

  • Transform all learning spaces into collaborative and connected environments, enveloping the student in the latest technology
  • Promote student participation, immersion, and engagement throughout the learning process
  • Provide access to limitless interactive teaching and learning resources that bring lessons to life and energise students

ACTIVPANEL®

The ActivPanel is the premium solution that delivers an easy to use tablet-like experience and puts the digital world at the fingertips of teachers and students.

Powered with innovative InGlass™ technology, the ActivPanel continues to offer the industry’s most natural writing experience using, enabling both teachers and students to collaborate in front of the class with ease. The interactive panel automatically detects differences between pen, touch, and palm erase – allowing teachers to teach efficiently without switching between software tools. The new instant whiteboard brings the InGlass technology to life through free-form writing with practically no script-lag, pinch-zoom navigation, and pre-loaded teaching tools to enhance productivity.

The ActivPanel provides teacher-controlled wireless screen sharing, connection to Bluetooth® devices for hands-on learning, and access to free educational apps directly from the home screen.

Compatible with third-party device management software, including Google® G-Suite, VMWare Airwatch®, and Radix Viso, the ActivPanel enables IT administrators the capability, with support Mobile Device Management suites, to manage the ActivPanel centrally and provide over-the-air software updates.

The ActivPanel is available in 65″ 4K, 70″ HD, 75″ 4K, and 86″ 4K.

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