URL: string(12) "rm-education"

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ehetpostmeta.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND ( ( mt1.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt2.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND mt2.meta_value = '0' ) ) AND ( mt3.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt4.meta_key = 'protected' AND mt4.meta_value = '0' ) ) ) ) AND ehetposts.post_type = 'post' AND ((ehetposts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY ehetposts.ID ORDER BY ehetposts.menu_order, ehetposts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 21248 [post_author] => 63 [post_date] => 2020-01-23 00:00:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-23 00:00:47 [post_content] => Barely more than half of UK teachers believe that technology has the potential to positively impact their effectiveness in the classroom. Fifty-three percent of teachers - and 39% of academic leaders – gave the assertion in RM Education’s first teacher effectiveness review. Five-hundred and seventy-five teachers and academic leaders were interviewed for the study, which also found that 61% of respondents believed tech has the potential to improve education in the future. Confidence will be a key factor in technology being effectively adopted. A little over a quarter of teachers (27%) claim to be self-assured when using tech already provided by their school, with 42% believing that their confidence won’t improve in the coming years.
Teachers want technologies that make meaningful improvements to their roles  - Michael Oakes, RM Education
“For education professionals across the UK, interactive learning tools have promised significant improvements to the way students learn, helping to engage them in new and exciting ways,” said RM Education’s change strategy manager, Michael Oakes. “However, what’s clear is that for all the benefits these provide, there is still a significant amount of work to be done to ensure time-consuming administration and processes, such as assessment and monitoring pupil attendance across a term, are as simple and streamlined as possible. “Ultimately, unless leaders and teachers are confident with the technologies being introduced, any innovation and investment will fall by the wayside and not make the improvements teachers are looking for and students deserve.
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“Teachers want technologies that make meaningful improvements to their roles," added Oakes, "and which free them up to focus on what they’re passionate about: teaching in the classroom.” To that end, says the survey, teachers are hoping for technology to improve:
  • Lesson preparation and marking time savings (68%)
  • Time saving during the day (39%) 
  • Pupil engagement and behaviour improvements (20%)
And to help them achieve this, the tech they’d like to see introduced is:
  • Formative and summative assessments (84%)
  • School management information systems (64%)
  • Parental engagement systems (30%) 
  • Digital collaboration tools (28%) 
[post_title] => Barely half of UK teachers believe tech will improve their performance, finds study [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => barely-half-of-uk-teachers-believe-tech-will-improve-their-performance-finds-study [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-01-29 14:27:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-29 14:27:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=21248 [menu_order] => 276 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20370 [post_author] => 63 [post_date] => 2019-12-19 00:00:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-19 00:00:36 [post_content] => It’s a difficult time for many schools. New Ofsted frameworks are demanding more from teachers, budgets are tight and the volume of technology available to transform teaching and learning can understandably feel overwhelming. In my many conversations with school leaders, one of the most common difficulties I encounter is a lack of clarity on which solutions schools need to be implementing to tackle their challenges, and how to go about introducing them. I’ve seen too many schools where technology has been introduced without a clear plan and it’s caused more frustration than help. In 2020, it will be crucial that education technology strategy becomes less about the technology itself. Schools, and the wider industry, must stop talking about tech as a single solution to every issue, and instead should begin planning for how it can support existing initiatives and empower teachers to make the most of it. To do this, technology transformation needs to be planned in the same way that schools would plan any other investment: with clear goals, outcomes and deliverables. Not only this, but schools need to embrace a mentality of change and ensure that staff are trained and supported so that they can use these technologies effectively. Without these, technology for its own sake will continue to hold many institutions back. As schools get to grips with the technologies they need - amid a backdrop of Ofsted inspections and changing expectations - I believe 2020 will see the rebirth of technology as a positive force in schools. Many poorly implemented projects and a growing number of competing vendors have led to senior leaders losing faith in technology and investment. Only by working together as an industry can we combat this and help ensure schools are best equipped to educate the next generation.
Schools will become increasingly demanding and discerning in how they buy their technology solutions and services
Growing digital literacy of staff will put pressure on schools to innovate As the next generation of teachers enter the workforce, schools are now encountering young professionals who are digital natives. From sufficient internet speeds to classroom technology and cloud management, these teachers are now putting pressure on schools to innovate more quickly and clearly. And the schools that are doing digital effectively are proving far more desirable places to work for younger teachers. In turn, this is helping make schools more educated consumers when it comes to technology solutions. Whether they want smarter ways of working, cloud technology or the ability for teachers and students to access resources remotely, these digital natives have a much better idea of the changes they’d like to see happen in school, and how to help make that happen. Cloud-based infrastructure will become the norm In 2020, the majority of large schools will have made significant progress towards migrating to a cloud-based infrastructure. The on-premise infrastructure of the past no longer provides the accessibility, ease of use and flexibility that modern learning and schools require. Teachers now need to be able to access information remotely, and students benefit tremendously when they can access the same learning environment at home as at school. There are other benefits to cloud adoption in schools, too. While, in the past, learning technologies such as VR, interactive screens and online portals had been viewed sceptically, cloud adoption in other sectors is enabling decision makers to understand their value and how to drive them forward. Ultimately, we’re seeing schools becoming more confident in their adoption of cloud, and really focusing on the technical systems which will help both the infrastructure and classroom learning.
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Schools will begin using data in context to better understand classroom trends Data is crucial to the day-to-day processes of the running of a school. From keeping track of attendance, exam results and performance in class, data – and the management information systems (MIS) which handle it – is the backbone of modern teaching. However, while an MIS allows teachers to easily understand performance in a classroom, schools now need to begin viewing the data they collect in context. Only then will they be able to truly understand its value and predict future trends to help them anticipate upcoming problems or challenges. For example, data highlighting a sudden increase in absences in class is far more valuable to a school if it is understood within the context of the time of year, such as whether it’s in the run up to the holidays or exam season, and helps teachers to adequately plan around this in future years. While an MIS is fundamental to the management of a school, it’s only as useful as the ease of accessing, analysing and applying the data in decision making within it is. And this has to be done without a burden of training for staff. In 2020, we’ll see the rise of MIS which allow teachers and office staff to extract data and produce reports quickly and easily, using an intuitive interface that doesn’t require specialist skills or hours of training. We believe schools will need to focus on how to get real value out of their MIS, and build outcome-focused programmes that utilise management information effectively in order to demonstrate improvements and results.
Technology transformation needs to be planned in the same way that schools would plan any other investment: with clear goals, outcomes and deliverables
Cloud migration will drive cybersecurity adoption As with many sectors, schools face increasing cybersecurity threats, potentially posing a risk to student data and day-to-day operations. Hackers can target organisations with distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, which limit access to the internet and online resources, or directly attempt to manipulate or steal data. In order for schools to adequately cope with these threats, they will need to introduce a robust cybersecurity and business continuity strategy. Solutions such as encryption, managed cloud services and two-factor authentication can all help to limit the threats cybercriminals pose to a school. With this in mind, schools will become increasingly demanding and discerning in how they buy their technology solutions and services. They will need to ensure the providers they’re working with understand the threats they face and have implemented the appropriate standards, processes and protections to mitigate the risk of attack. This will impact a school’s choice of network connectivity, hardware, software, and access management. Schools are already implementing cloud-based solutions which can help mitigate this risk, enabling teaching and learning to continue in the face of major disruption. Implementing these solutions will require network managers to work with a trusted third party to identify vulnerabilities and ensure they are addressed in a timely manner. This will also need to be communicated to staff and teachers, to help them understand what it means for the business and how they can maintain best practice, particularly in areas like password management. And this needs to be a cyclical process – new vulnerabilities continually emerge, and a school must ensure it understands these threats and deals with them in real time. RM Education: rm.com [post_title] => What edtech trends can educators look forward to in 2020? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-edtech-trends-can-educators-look-forward-to-in-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-18 17:17:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-18 17:17:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=20370 [menu_order] => 346 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19418 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-11-11 10:09:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-11 10:09:49 [post_content] => Last month, the Commons Education Committee released its review of the special education needs (SEND) system in the UK. The review concluded that the reforms to support children and young people introduced in the 2014 act were the right ones, but poor implementation has left local authorities, schools and families struggling to work with a system that is contributing to poor educational and social outcomes for some students. One of the issues highlighted was a lack of guidance and training for teachers and schools across the country struggling to provide adequate educational services to SEND students.

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While the review paints a particularly difficult picture for education professionals, the recently announced £780m increase to local authorities' high-needs funding from government provides fiscal support to help address these challenges. So how should schools  invest this funding in ways that help to boost inclusion and improve learning outcomes for SEND students in the classroom?

Investing in pupils first

With almost 15% of all students in the UK having special education needs, schools are under increasing pressure to invest in solutions that can deliver. While it can be tempting to introduce new gadgets and technologies, it can be hard to know how best to create a level playing field and equality of access for SEND students. The reality is that there is no single technology solution that can address the needs of SEND students. What’s needed is a blended approach of providing administrative and management solutions which can help teachers spend more time in the classroom, and classroom technologies which can help SEND pupils experience equal access to the curriculum.
With almost 15% of all students in the UK having special education needs, schools are under increasing pressure to invest in solutions that can deliver.
The school’s management information system (MIS) can play an important role in supporting SEND students.  It provides teachers with a single point of information about SEND student requirements, as well as helping to spot behaviour patterns and identify where students might need extra support.  This is particularly relevant where peripatetic support services are being used and multiple individuals are involved in supporting and monitoring SEND students’ progress. The MIS should ideally also help streamline and simplify administrative activities – which combined with better management information should reduce the amount of time teachers spend inputting and analysing data, and increase the amount of time they can spend focused on what happens in the classroom. When it comes to providing equal access to the curriculum for students, it’s important to employ solutions and technologies that are flexible and can adapt to different needs. For example, by incorporating visual elements in a presentation to promote engagement for students with ADHD or ensuring that digital information is available via text-to-speech software for visually impaired students. It can also be useful to look at some basic components of IT infrastructure.

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Training teachers to use technology

While some technology investment is without a doubt of real benefit to SEND students by helping create an inclusive classroom environment, simply buying new equipment alone is not necessarily helpful. Investment is crucially needed to make sure teachers are supported and trained to not only understand SEND needs, but to ensure they can use technology effectively. Investing in technology to support SEND students requires the same planning and forethought as any other investment in technology – and without a clarity of vision and purpose and understanding the specific outcomes they want to achieve schools may struggle to implement meaningful change. [post_title] => Technology’s role in SEND education investment [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technologys-role-in-send-education-investment [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-11 10:10:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-11 10:10:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=19418 [menu_order] => 419 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14649 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-04-25 00:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-24 23:00:42 [post_content] => New research has revealed that fewer than half of schools and colleges in the UK believe they are fully compliant with GDPR statutes. The research, carried out by RM Education and Trend Micro, shows that only 48% of respondents from schools and colleges across the UK stated that they believe their institution to be fully GDPR compliant.
From the latest issue: How has the first year of GDPR impacted education?
Legacy systems were stated as a core challenge by 23% of respondents, with 46% citing security awareness, and 31% a lack of financial investment. In terms of safety, 77% of respondents stated they were confident that their school or college was as secure as it could be against a data breach. However, only 71% of schools had a formal data breach response plan in place. Steve Forbes, principal product manager at RM Education said: “One surprising finding is that 91% of schools and colleges surveyed stated that they knew where all their data resides. “Schools and colleges process large quantities of data on their pupils, staff and suppliers, and it’s likely that data is in more places than perhaps thought.”
GDPR compliance does not sit with one role alone; and the responsibility for compliance is shared. – Steve Forbes, RM Education
The research does suggest, however, that schools and colleges are taking GDPR seriously and that significant steps have been taken to work towards ensuring compliance. Of those surveyed, 97% had updated their policies, 89% had increased staff training, 85% had hired a DPO (data protection officer) and 83% carried out a data audit. However, there are some confusions about who should be responsible for GDPR compliance, as well as 38% of respondents reporting an increased IT spend as a result of becoming GDPR compliant. Forbes said: “60% of those surveyed said final responsibility for GDPR sits with the principal or head teacher, 42% said the responsibility also sits with the DPO, and 31% said responsibility also lies with the head of IT.
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“GDPR compliance does not sit with one role alone; and the responsibility for compliance is shared.” In terms of the biggest threats to data, 75% of respondents cited accidental loss by staff, and 19% said cybercriminals. The full report can be found at rm.com/GDPR-in-schools [post_title] => Fewer than half of UK schools think they are GDPR compliant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fewer-than-half-of-uk-schools-think-they-are-gdpr-compliant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-24 12:25:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-24 11:25:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=14649 [menu_order] => 871 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14379 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-04-13 00:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-12 23:00:09 [post_content] => Effective parental engagement is an ongoing concern for schools, and as the default channels evolve, so must a school’s approach to communications. If schools want parents to engage fully with the school, it is important to create the right spaces to allow them to talk about the rounded education that their children receive – more than simply reporting on a child’s academic results. Some parents are hungry for information, particularly regarding the nature of their child’s studies, and the development of great parent communication channels can help facilitate valuable and helpful dialogue.

ICT at the core of communications

One of the core principles of a successful communications strategy for schools is engagement outside of the school gates, with a whole-school, community-based approach. Research consistently shows that parental engagement is one of the key factors in securing higher student achievement. The traditional reporting cycle of two, maybe three times a year does not enable positive parental involvement. If parents receive more regular feedback on their child’s progress, it is easier to foster a collaborative relationship between parent and school. Technology has huge potential to involve parents, facilitating greater learning at home and encouraging greater involvement in school activities.Streamlining parental communication Parents communicate through a range of different channels. The most obvious change over recent years is the increase of parent communities on social media, for example private Facebook groups. It is crucial, especially when sending urgent information, that information is disseminated to parents as quickly as possible, using the channels that they engage with most frequently. There will never be ‘one size fits all’ solution, however engaging with parents using the channels they already use increases the value of communications, and the likelihood of them engaging with the school.
For parental engagement to be sustainable, school communication systems need to be easy to adopt and easy to manage.

Evaluating school communication

For parental engagement to be sustainable, school communication systems need to be easy to adopt and easy to manage. Tools which allow schools to monitor responses to texts or emails is important in ensuring messages are being received. Also, when schools are informing parents of important school updates, such as snow day announcements, it is crucial that the school knows this information is being received and read. Real-time tracking in parental engagement tools allows schools to monitor how many people have opened and read their communications and assess whether an additional communication is required.

ICT to help learning at home

Great educational outcomes are a result of excellent teaching, students engaged with their studies, and supportive parents. ICT can be used as a valuable support tool giving parents access to the same teaching resources used in the classroom. Some schools’ websites will include details about current curriculum, future assignments, and give examples of student work, all of which support the opportunities for further learning at home. In addition, the storing of students’ work in the cloud allows students to develop a digital portfolio, which can be accessible for parents at home. This also creates more opportunities for parents to be more informed on their child’s progress and involved in supporting learning at home.

Creating spaces for conversation and collaboration

Engagement with parents should be an ongoing conversation. Communications should not be confined to sending out announcements and newsletters, but instead create an opportunity for learning providers to discover what parents think. By using ICT to facilitate this, schools can make changes and improve processes in line with parents’ views and prove to Ofsted that the school is engaging with parents using the most helpful channels. Sharing videos, interactive question forms and other features in communications allow schools to really engage with parents beyond simply a one-way information flow. [post_title] => How to improve parental engagement through ICT [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-improve-parental-engagement-through-ict [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-16 14:33:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-16 13:33:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=14379 [menu_order] => 897 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12802 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-01-31 09:23:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-31 09:23:10 [post_content] => Come January 14, 2020, Microsoft will no longer support the Windows 7 operating system. This means that security patches for software vulnerabilities will no longer be available for the system, meaning that schools still using Windows 7 will be open to attack from viruses and other malicious software. Research by RM Education shows that 50% (37,400 of 75,000) of its customers are still using Windows 7, and as such the discontinuation of support could have significant security implications. Jeremy Cooper, managing director of RM Education, said: “We understand the challenges that schools face, and know that with the continual squeeze on school budgets, replacing older devices can be difficult. We believe that 30% of the devices that we look after for schools are more than five years old. However, this move to Windows 10 is an essential one if schools are to fully protect themselves from malicious attacks.” [post_title] => Windows 7 could leave schools open to attack [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => windows-7-could-leave-schools-open-to-attack [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-31 09:23:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-31 09:23:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=12802 [menu_order] => 1081 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10249 [post_author] => 74 [post_date] => 2019-01-16 11:20:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-01-16 11:20:48 [post_content] => Most schools underutilise ICT, finds ISBA's IT survey. So much so, that two in three Bursars question the value-for-money of their IT. The ISC Digital Strategy Group and ISBA’s recommendations to address this, emphasise the importance of deciding what you want from your school IT, putting teachers at the heart of a structured plan to get there, investing in training your teachers to use IT, using a cloud platform for more than just email and storage, sorting out your infrastructure and getting external expert help where you need it. Furthermore, the overriding advice from ISBA and the ISC Digital Strategy Group for school IT is to have a plan, involve and train teachers, and not to go it alone. Once you have read the recommendations, it’s likely you’ll be wondering how to get started on implementing them. Where do you turn?/how will you find the time?/how much should you invest? are all probably questions you’ll be asking. Here are two ways we can help:

ICT Audit

Any credible school IT partner ought to be able to give you a simple red/amber/green summary of your current school technology. RM offers this ICT Audit as a free-of-charge service; one of our local engineers visits for a few hours and we’ll produce a summary report for you within a few days. Knowing where your current technology is at today provides a good foundation from which to begin your planning. "RM’s free but comprehensive initial ICT audit provided us with a detailed and readily understandable review of the status of ICT in school and their consultancy has energised us to investigate alternative technologies and teaching approaches, whilst considering how to get the best value and longevity out of our current ICT," said Rachel Friar, The Marist Schools.

Staff Impact Survey

Our popular Staff Impact Survey quickly builds up a picture of the level of ‘maturity’ of your staff’s use of IT. This gives you:
  • A distribution of IT skills vs application, allowing you to plan future staff training in a more effective manner, based on where they’re starting from. This avoids one-size-(never)-fits-all training!
  • Spider diagrams that illustrate which skills you have in-house and which you’d benefit from external help with, e.g. you may have in-house experts in the use of resource, but not so much for collaboration.
  • A sample of attitudes surrounding the potential of IT to enhance learning outcomes and where staff want most help first. Often this is more positive than initially thought!
  • A benchmark of where you’re beginning, relative to other independent and state schools, drawn from the other 6,000 or so teachers who have also completed it. Comparison can be useful motivation.
Further to the ICT Audit and the Staff Impact Survey, there are many more ways we can assist you on your journey to ICT success and the confident use of technology. Call our team on 0845 3077 832 or email supportservices@rm.com to find out more about ICT support for independent schools. We have also developed a useful online ICT Health Check Tool. If you need a quick assessment of your school’s technology click here to get started. [post_title] => Beat the IT underutilisation crisis in your independent school [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => beat-the-it-underutilisation-crisis-in-your-independent-school [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-01-16 14:26:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-01-16 14:26:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=10249 [menu_order] => 1107 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 7 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 21248 [post_author] => 63 [post_date] => 2020-01-23 00:00:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-23 00:00:47 [post_content] => Barely more than half of UK teachers believe that technology has the potential to positively impact their effectiveness in the classroom. Fifty-three percent of teachers - and 39% of academic leaders – gave the assertion in RM Education’s first teacher effectiveness review. Five-hundred and seventy-five teachers and academic leaders were interviewed for the study, which also found that 61% of respondents believed tech has the potential to improve education in the future. Confidence will be a key factor in technology being effectively adopted. A little over a quarter of teachers (27%) claim to be self-assured when using tech already provided by their school, with 42% believing that their confidence won’t improve in the coming years.
Teachers want technologies that make meaningful improvements to their roles  - Michael Oakes, RM Education
“For education professionals across the UK, interactive learning tools have promised significant improvements to the way students learn, helping to engage them in new and exciting ways,” said RM Education’s change strategy manager, Michael Oakes. “However, what’s clear is that for all the benefits these provide, there is still a significant amount of work to be done to ensure time-consuming administration and processes, such as assessment and monitoring pupil attendance across a term, are as simple and streamlined as possible. “Ultimately, unless leaders and teachers are confident with the technologies being introduced, any innovation and investment will fall by the wayside and not make the improvements teachers are looking for and students deserve.
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“Teachers want technologies that make meaningful improvements to their roles," added Oakes, "and which free them up to focus on what they’re passionate about: teaching in the classroom.” To that end, says the survey, teachers are hoping for technology to improve:
  • Lesson preparation and marking time savings (68%)
  • Time saving during the day (39%) 
  • Pupil engagement and behaviour improvements (20%)
And to help them achieve this, the tech they’d like to see introduced is:
  • Formative and summative assessments (84%)
  • School management information systems (64%)
  • Parental engagement systems (30%) 
  • Digital collaboration tools (28%) 
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