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Why are cheating prevention tools important?

Not only do cheating prevention tools help to ensure that the integrity and security of your assessments, essays and exams are maintained, but they can also provide your teaching staff and students with total peace of mind. At a time when online delivery is going to be more common, for the time being at least, cheating prevention tools offer education establishments the opportunity to engage with their students and remind them why honesty and integrity is so important when it comes to their studies, especially in regards to the authenticity and originality of their work. One of the biggest challenges of the remote classroom is that students are able to collude and copy/paste information from the internet more easily without detection. In addition, the freedom of studying from home means that some students are more tempted to turn to plagiarism or the help of others to complete their work. On top of this, it has never been more vital to regularly communicate with students, and ensure that they know how to access the learning support that's available to them. Online cheating prevention technology can help establishments engage with their students in a creative way, as well as address any suspicions of academic misconduct without the need for face-to-face meetings or panels.

What brands manufacture cheating prevention tools?

There are several key brands within the cheating prevention tools marketplace. Some of the most notable brands include Turnitin, Plagscan and Urkund.

How can institutions run exams online and keep them secure?

In light of the current global COVID-19 pandemic, many educational institutions are making the move to run their exams online for the foreseeable future. In these unprecedented and uncertain times, it's going to be increasingly important for schools, colleges and universities to minimise the learning disruption for their students, and maintain academic integrity at the same time. Online examination software such Speedwell Software can help institutions improve their remote exam processes in several ways and ensure they are run securely. Examples of features include statistical analysis and blueprinting (where the desired requirements of an exam can be checked to ensure that the topic or learning objective is at the appropriate difficulty level) can provide insights that can be used to improve online exams on an ongoing basis.

What tools can be used to prevent cheating?

There are several options available for teachers and lecturers who want to ensure they can deliver high-quality assessments on a secure, remote basis. Some common features of cheating prevention tools include:
  • Integrated assessment system: If you’re looking to create and administer your exams in one place, as well as receive a range of analytics and reports, then an integrated assessment system is for you. Not only is this type of system easy to use, but it will also help to ensure that your online exams can run in a completely secure way.
  • Preventing plagiarism: A system that is designed to prevent plagiarism will check essays and submissions against an extremely large record of current and archived web pages, student submissions on a global basis, as well as journal articles. On top of helping to encourage academic integrity, they can also help to tackle emerging challenges such as text spinners and contract cheating, and also provide feedback for students that allows them to reflect on their own approach to their studies.
  • Cloud hosting: To get your online exams established as quickly as possible, a secure cloud hosting option could provide an extremely effective solution. As well as reducing the need to invest in additional software or infrastructure, all of this will be managed by the tool provider. In addition, you will also benefit from the latest version of the technology, and will receive all of the latest updates.
  • Fully automated: Some systems have the capability to detect, prevent and manage plagiarism, regardless of the language the text is written in, through text recognition. As part of this, fully automated reports are produced which allow educators to explore a range of insights, and these can then be used to take action against students that they suspect of cheating.
  • Integrate with existing LMS: If you already use an existing LMS (Learning Management System), you may want to find a cheating prevention tool that can seamlessly integrate with it. Luckily, many systems are already compatible with some of education’s most popular platforms, including Moodle and Canvas. It’s also possible to easily import documents directly from your computer, or file storage services such as OneDrive, Google Drive and Dropbox.
While the length of time that education establishments will need to operate remotely is still uncertain, the need to ensure that exams and assessments are completed with integrity is something that will never change. To minimise the risk of plagiarism and cheating at this current time, cheating prevention platforms can not only help to protect your reputation, but also give both students and teaching staff the tools that they need to get ahead. To find out more about cheating prevention tools, read our buyer’s guides: Turnitin: Tools to ensure remote assessment with integrity Speedwell Software: Run secure exams remotely Urkund: Preventing plagiarism not punishing it [post_title] => Cheating prevention tools: helping to promote honesty and integrity in education [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cheating-prevention-tools-helping-to-promote-honesty-and-integrity-in-education [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-30 13:49:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-30 12:49:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?p=30239 [menu_order] => 978 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27381 [post_author] => 1024 [post_date] => 2020-06-03 12:30:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-06-03 11:30:37 [post_content] => It seems remote learning will be a fact of life in some form or other for the foreseeable future. This 'new normal' means that your students will have a degree of academic independence never seen before.  Having the right tools to help them avoid plagiarism and other forms of misconduct in this unique setting is crucial in order to maintain the integrity of your remote assessments.   
One of the biggest challenges of teaching in the remote classroom is that it is far easier for students to collude and copy/paste information directly from the internet
One of the biggest challenges of teaching in the remote classroom is that it is far easier for students to collude and copy/paste information directly from the internet. The alien nature of their home study environment also places students in a more vulnerable position, creating an additional risk that they may turn to plagiarism or get others to do their work for them.  Turnitin understands the challenges you're facing. We have been helping educational institutions instil integrity and counter the threat of academic misconduct for 20 years. We know that with the right tools in place, you can continue to support your students and keep integrity central to each step of your assessment process – even in this landscape.       Over 15,000 institutions across the globe partner with Turnitin to address various forms of student cheating, including copy/paste plagiarism, student collusion and contract cheating. Our software provides their educators with the certainty that every time a student submits work, it's their own.    Our partnerships help to create a culture of academic integrity at these institutions. We have first-hand knowledge of how instances of plagiarism can have a negative impact on an institution’s reputation, in addition to harming academic outcomes for individual students.           Our goal is always to help institutions take proactive steps to mitigate these risks. Instilling students with the values of academic integrity not only sets them up for educational success, but also gives them a valuable life skill to use throughout their career.       

Tools to ensure integrity 

Turnitin solutions are designed to prevent plagiarism, develop academic integrity and support the individual needs of educators working across all education sectors. We can help your institution: 
  • Prevent copy/paste plagiarism and student collusion using the world’s most effective plagiarism detection solution 
  • Check the authenticity and originality of submissions against 70 billion current and archived web pages, one billion global student submissions and 170 million scholarly journal articles 
  • Tackle emerging challenges to academic integrity such as contract cheating, code similarity, text spinners and mosaic plagiarism tools 
  • Provide rich, actionable feedback to encourage student self-reflection and ensure rigour is maintained remotely 
  • Achieve time-savings of up to 38% on marking and providing feedback to students 
  • Utilise intelligent, data-driven analytics to improve the quality of teaching across an institution 
  • Help students cultivate writing skills, build critical thinking skills and prepare them for their career after education. 
  Estimating the length of time that our education system will have to operate under the shadow of COVID-19 is far from clear. What we are sure of is that the need to ensure the integrity of our assessments, regardless of educational setting, will far outlast it.   The risk of plagiarism may be greater in the current climate, but with the right tools, you can reduce its impact at your institution, safeguard your reputation, and give teachers and students the support they need to succeed.   For more information about how Turnitin can help your institution ensure the continued integrity of your assessments, please email integrity@turnitin.com or visit turnitin.com. [post_title] => Tools to ensure remote assessment with integrity [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => turnitin-tools-to-ensure-remote-assessment-with-integrity [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-07 12:04:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-07 11:04:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?p=27381 [menu_order] => 1029 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32712 [post_author] => 83 [post_date] => 2020-09-08 09:04:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-08 08:04:45 [post_content] => ET-Black-Logo

EDUCATION WEBINAR REPLAY

OVERCOMING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

The secret to turning students into digital citizens

By watching this webinar you agree to signing up to Education Technology website. This includes receiving the email newsletter which includes the latest edtech news, exclusive content and webinar invitations. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link on the bottom of any correspondence from us. We will also share your information with the webinar partners Turnitin. For full terms read our privacy policy.

EDUCATION WEBINAR LEARNINGS

In this webinar our expert guests discussed how to not only identify, but also to help students avoid plagiarising while learning remotely, and in blended programmes.

WE COVERED:

  • Digital literacy and independent research
  • Accidental plagiarism
  • Nurturing confident, responsible and independent digital citizens
  • Best preparing students for the next steps in their academic career

EDUCATION WEBINAR GUEST SPEAKER

Lasse Nielsen

Lasse is a Dane working in the Czech Republic. He is in charge of Academic Honesty at the Ostrava International School and works with some truly dedicated teachers to uphold the academic integrity of all students. Lasse has worked in all levels of education, from Pre-K to High School, and is currently teaching Humanities, Design, and Theory of Knowledge in the Middle Years and High School IB program.

Nicola Blackwell

Nicola is Turnitin’s Territory Manager for Secondary and Further education across the UK & Europe. Leading a team of consultants who are all focussed on one thing: supporting educators in their quest to support student attainment, achieve feedback and marking efficiencies for teachers, and ensure academic integrity across the institution. Having worked at Turnitin for over nine years, Nicola is passionate about helping teachers and students, making a difference to their everyday lives through Turnitin solutions.

EDUCATION WEBINAR IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Used in 98% of UK universities, Turnitin has been a partner for higher education in the UK for over 15 years. Our journey has taken us from plagiarism detection to academic integrity, evolving to support new and emerging misconduct threats.

We are committed to continuing to collaborate with you to address current and future issues facing the sector.

WANT TO WATCH MORE EDUCATION WEBINARS?

UPCOMING EDUCATION WEBINARS EDUCATION WEBINAR REPLAYS [post_title] => Overcoming academic dishonesty: The secret to turning students into digital citizens [post_excerpt] => Live webinar with guests Turnitin. Free to join. 7 October @ 11am London BST... [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => overcoming-academic-dishonesty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-10-09 18:27:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-10-09 17:27:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?p=32712 [menu_order] => 1121 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 21887 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 07:20:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 07:20:37 [post_content] => Sustainability is a hot topic in the education sector. Above all else, people and institutions are looking to save money and meet increasingly pressing green targets. This year we’re likely to see increased mobile technology and virtual reality starting to have an impact on things like food choices. Technology Enabled Care Services’ (TECS) carbon footprint software allows institutions to calculate the carbon footprint of food; while MOOC learning software enables users to see how buildings are performing energy-wise. Any institution not using tech to save energy and money these days is a rarity. But it’s not always as easy as it seems. “The main sustainability challenge for UK universities this year is definitely how they are going to rapidly cut their greenhouse gas emissions and reach net zero targets,” says Iain Patton, CEO at the alliance for sustainability leadership in education (EAUC). “There is no doubt education technology will need to play a role in this. Universities must ensure they are maximising the use of edtech to decrease emissions where possible (by saving on travel, for example), as well as encouraging students and staff to come up with innovative new edtech to further help society decrease its emissions.” There have been some landmark achievements in the last 12 months. The Green Gown Awards recognise exceptional sustainability initiatives undertaken by universities and colleges across the world. Last year’s highlights included the University of Bristol’s Sustainable Futures online course. This free programme uses real-life video case studies of people making a difference in diverse ways. So far, 5,700 people have undertaken the course, including 2,000 students, and feedback has shown it has motivated many to become more sustainable. The University of Edinburgh developed its Digital Ambassadors scheme to boost digital literacy in Edinburgh, as well as to empower those who lack the skills needed to undertake tasks like online food shopping, or keeping in touch with family by email. This is hugely beneficial to the health and wellbeing of those receiving help and support. One of the finalists in the Green Gown ‘Research with impact: student’ category developed a tool designed to calculate the carbon sequestration of an individual tree (which means you can calculate how much carbon capture a development will cost if it involves the cutting of trees); while another created an interactive online wellbeing map that gives a comprehensive guide to campus wellbeing facilities. The University of the West of Scotland’s (UWS) Lanarkshire campus, designed around sustainability, is one of the greenest in the UK. Powered by 100% renewable energy from a nearby windfarm, the campus has flexible and collaborative teaching areas, some of which are available for use by the local community and businesses to ensure no space is wasted.

Journeying to net zero

Mathew Hassell is the CEO and founder of education transport management provider Kura, which helps education institutions be more sustainable by overhauling their transport operations, using powerful tracking and app technologies to provide a safer, greener and more intelligent school run service. “Currently, around 25% of peak-time car usage is associated with the school run, with just 20% of students making use of shared transport,” says Hassell. “Our innovative, technology-driven services encourage greater uptake of shared transport amongst students, by improving safety, efficiency and reliability.” Every 49-seater coach takes up to 31 cars off the road, so by working with schools to make their home-to-school transport services more user-friendly, Kura is able to make a huge difference to air pollution levels. In addition to reducing the number of cars, Kura also encourages education establishments to optimise their shared transport routes, further cutting down unnecessary carbon emissions. “We’re finding that educational establishments are now looking to the future a lot more, and, as a result, are interested in agreeing longer contracts where this will directly lead to greater improvements in sustainability,” says Hassell. But Kura’s work is not yet done: “While we have been making some really great progress within the education sector, our ultimate ambition is to make zero-emission shared transport a reality for schools and universities,” says Hassell. “We know that moving from traditionally fuelled vehicles to electric buses holds the key to this ambition. Unfortunately, the charging infrastructure to support this move is currently not there, as electric buses have different power requirements to conventional electric vehicles and cannot rely on existing charging infrastructure.  This is further complicated by the need for coach operators to be able to run their vehicles on longer journeys between school services in order to make a return on the considerable investment an electric vehicle requires.” Kura is now in the process of establishing its own network of bus-charging points across the country, working towards a national infrastructure that could be used by other fleets of electric buses.
  Our ultimate ambition is to make zero-emission shared transport a reality for schools and universities  

Sustainability isn’t always obvious

Vevox, formerly known as Meetoo, is a Hampshire-based engagement app company. The company develops a polling and discussion app that increases engagement and participation in meetings and classes, or at conferences and events. Managing director Pete Eyre says that apps like this are a simple way for institutions to streamline. “Many institutions are operating on outdated legacy systems,” says Eyre, “and this sort of tech offers universities an opportunity to keep students engaged through modern solutions that can be easily integrated into existing IT systems and processes.” He adds that, “choosing an outsourced solution means institutions don’t need to spend extra costs and resources developing their own systems. All of this makes for a much more sustainable and flexible long-term investment option.” There is an economy of scale with modern edtech too, says Eyre, particularly with the advent of cloud-based platforms: “A feature-added based on the requirements of one higher education institution can immediately be available and of benefit to all institutions using that platform…In the past, software licensing meant installing increasingly outdated versions or, where in-house software was used, institutions being faced with the cost of developing a feature in them alone.”

Future-planning 

While solutions that review energy use or encourage recycling are great, Clare McSheaffrey, head of marketing and events at CoSector, University of London, believes that “if the sector is going to truly make a difference, there are some much more advanced approaches which could be adopted in years to come”. Paperless processes are already in place in some areas of HE, says McSheaffrey, “such as essays which can be submitted by VLE tools such as Turnitin, rather than physical copies. Recent advancements in digital assessment could see us take this even further. Moving examinations completely online, we could see a huge reduction in paper used by universities, not to mention huge efficiencies and time savings when it comes to collecting and marking.” Though there are plenty of good-news stories, there are still challenges, says Iain Patton: “There are some common stumbling blocks – quite often an institution might encourage a sustainable behaviour change, but lack the infrastructure to support it.” The key, he says, “is balancing the social side of sustainability with the economic and environmental side, and learning from mistakes.” 
You might also like: Winner announced of schools competition to promote zero emission transport [post_title] => Using tech to save the planet [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => using-tech-to-save-the-planet-sustainability [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-11-17 02:47:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-11-17 02:47:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=21887 [menu_order] => 1302 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20952 [post_author] => 86 [post_date] => 2020-01-15 14:59:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-15 14:59:59 [post_content] => Bett 2020 kicks off in just one week, meaning educators and edtech providers are gearing up to explore the best products and services the sector has to offer. This year, Turnitin is set to exhibit more of its transformative solutions. In just 18 months, the company has launched Authorship, the first product to help institutions investigate contract cheating; and Gradescope, a product that has used machine learning to revolutionise the grading process. Following Turnitin's announcement of its new partnership with Microsoft at the event last year, the team will announce the general availability of its Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020. Armed with Turnitin within Microsoft Teams, teachers can access the most comprehensive plagiarism detection solution alongside their favourite Microsoft apps.
You might also like: New Bett body looks to shape education worldwide
At 2pm on 22 and 23 of January, and 11am on 24 January at Bett, Turnitin will welcome two special guests from Barnsley College to its stand (Hall N1-19, Stand NM40). Rob Whitehead and Rob Lea will share their experience of Turnitin in Microsoft Teams, touching on Barnsley's fivefold increase in student engagement, as well as improvements in helping teachers save time. College representatives will also share tips and insights on how using Turnitin and Microsoft Teams alongside each other has helped teachers prepare students for success in university and beyond, instilling a culture of academic integrity, encouraging critical thinking and strengthening digital literacy. To register your attendance for Bett 2020, click here [post_title] => Turnitin to showcase Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => turnitin-microsoft-teams-integration-bett-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=20952 [menu_order] => 1401 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20612 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2020-01-02 09:16:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-02 09:16:49 [post_content] => Choosing and implementing new technology for an educational establishment can be a perilous process. The quantity of the available solutions and their variety can overwhelm administrators. Nonetheless, using the right plagiarism checker technology is crucial for boosting the productivity of the institution. As Bill Gates once said:  “The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.” How to make the right decision and invest in the best tool? Let’s go over the list of factors to consider.

1. Functionality and efficiency

Every LMS administrator knows the educational technology needs of their department or institution. As a representative of your school, you can tell for sure what features you require to boost the performance of teachers and students. As Craig Kemp, global edtech and digital transformation consultant and educator, said, “we need to focus on what makes our jobs as educators more efficient and effective and how tools can support students to learn easier, better, and more effectively.” A chosen solution should help teachers save time while being more efficient and effective. If software under consideration adds extra effort to the workflow, keep looking for a better one.

2. User experience

Another essential thing to consider when picking a tool for your academic institution is its user-friendliness. The tool you choose should not be hard to figure out. After being introduced to it, teachers should be able to get the most of its functionality right away, and the navigation should not be confusing or inconsequential. After all, technology should simplify things for us instead of complicating them. Every modern school needs an up-to-date plagiarism checker. It helps teachers evaluate the papers of their students faster and more comprehensively while discouraging cheating. If you're looking for a Turnitin alternative, take a solid look at Unicheck – an easy-to-integrate plagiarism checker that doesn't need any workflow change. 

3. Speed

Naturally, every new tool requires time to install and learn. Yet, after the installation and introduction processes are over, there shouldn’t be any more standbys and hindrances in its performance. Make sure that the solution you choose for your establishment works quickly enough.  Let’s take a plagiarism checker for teachers, for example. While some services put your papers in a queue that might last for hours and take a long time to check every document, Unicheck takes just up to twenty seconds per page. Teachers have dozens of papers to grade every week; this means every minute counts.
You might also like: Putting assessment to the test

4. Integration

No matter how functional and promising a solution might look, don’t forget to consider its integration process. Will it be easy for your academic institution to integrate it? Will you need help from the support team to set it up? Is there any onboard training and implementation help provided by the service supplier? Clearing out these points will save you from nasty surprises along the instalment process.

5. Continuous innovation

One of the things you should check before committing to a product is whether its creators continuously update it. The provider should enhance its existing features and roll out the new ones whenever there's any demand or complaints from the users. Anticipating user needs before they voice them is even better. Check user reviews of the product to find out whether the updates and improvements are smooth and bug-free. A good plagiarism checker for teachers would adjust in response to new cheating techniques like digital text modifications.

6. Team and support

The people behind the product are also of great significance. When it comes to education technology, its creators need to show a comprehensive understanding of the contemporary educational system, its processes, goals and challenges. Their customer support service should be responsive, competent and quick. In case you have any problems with the chosen solution, you need to be sure that it will be quickly addressed and fixed.

7. Pricing model

Things get complicated when it comes to the budget of an educational establishment. Educators are always pushed to do more with fewer resources. It’s also true when speaking of tech solutions. As an LMS admin, you probably have to search for the most price-efficient option. Yet, saving a few hundred dollars at the start might not be worth it in the long term. Check what you will get before paying for it and consider how the tech solution can impact your institution long-term.

Final Thoughts

Technology is far from substituting real teachers, but it can help them get more efficient and effective. When you are choosing between Unicheck or Turnitin, or any other two modern plagiarism checkers, evaluate the functionality and efficiency, user-friendliness, integration time and complexity, tech support, product update, and pricing model of every option. It will help you make a weighted decision and choose the tool that best suits the needs and resources of your institution. [post_title] => How to pick the best plagiarism checker for your academic institution [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-pick-the-best-plagiarism-checker-for-your-academic-institution [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-11-17 02:49:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-11-17 02:49:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=20612 [menu_order] => 1433 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19221 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-11-19 00:00:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-19 00:00:50 [post_content] =>

Remember and regurgitate, or develop skills for life? Getting students to engage meaningfully with a school, college or university’s assessments can be a challenge. But technology can be a game changer, allowing educators to mirror what students might have to do in their working lives. Blogging is one such skill, and is increasingly popular as a method of assessment in universities. University of Edinburgh lecturers Nina Morris and Hazel Christie looked at how geology and geography students responded to blogging as part of their assessment, and noted that “the continuous nature of blogging compels students to engage more, not just in individual classes, but also across the course as a whole. As a result, students are more able to make connections between course themes and make evaluations based on a broader subject knowledge base.”  Meanwhile, they concluded that tutors were given a more personal insight into what their students were learning. In the further education and schools sectors, a similarly open-minded approach to learning outcomes has led many to experiment  with online tools like SeeSaw through which students can create drawings, voice recordings and videos to show what they know in the way that works best for them.

Saving teachers time

It’s clear that it’s not just the learners being assessed that benefit from technology, but also their educators. Haylie Taylor has 13 years’ teaching experience, a decade of which was spent in primary schools, and she reflected on the main challenges for teachers: the first one being finding assessments. After all the printing and queuing for photocopiers that is associated with traditional paper assignments, she says that the appeal of online teaching and learning tools like EducationCity, for whom she now works as a consultant, is that “all assessments for the core subjects can be housed in one place. They can be set in just a few clicks and students can simply login on a computer or tablet to complete the assessment.”

Secondly, she recalls the heavy marking load: “Marking one 20-question assessment for one student might take 15 minutes. However, marking a whole class worth of English and maths assessments can take a weekend, and that’s if you’re quick! Then comes the data collection and analysis – this can be very time-consuming and labour intensive, especially if your assessment and data platforms are separate and you have to transfer this information between the two.” Online systems often mark automatically, providing teachers with the data they need instantly ­– often presented in a simple visual report to help them identify gaps and misconceptions at a glance.

Finally, Taylor notes that lots of time can be spent on closing the final part of that feedback loop. She says: “After getting to grips with the data, I’d need to think about how I’m going to support my class with those gaps and misconceptions that have been identified. If I already have the resources, I need to re-teach or allow my students to practice, then great, but if not, more time will be needed to either source or create relevant, curriculum-linked resources.” This is a further area where technology can assist by providing a central hub, with assignments tagged to relevant content. She says: “In some cases, the curriculum content can even be assigned automatically based on assessment results, saving teachers a significant chunk of time.”


SPONSORED: Maintaining academic integrity with Urkund

By Neil Walker, senior account manager, Nordics

Technology has changed the way we do business, live our lives and interact as human beings. One part of that change can be observed in the classroom. Suddenly, mobile phones were omnipresent and information available a few taps away, presenting new challenges and opportunities. One of these new challenges was to handle the information overflow and the mere copy-pasting of sources, legitimate or not. According to recent studies, cheating went up a staggering 40% in the years between 2015–2018 at top UK universities.*

Which isn’t all that surprising. More and more universities and schools are opting for technical solutions such as Urkund, which ultimately leads to a higher hit rate of exposed academic misconduct. Instead of having educators scrolling endlessly through documents trying to single out sources, a fully automated system doing the work for them can be a true lifesaver. Besides the fact it saves time it also checks sources that are behind paywalls or were previously submitted by another student. Based on our experience, this is where 80% of all plagiarism can be found. A great upside is (and this is confirmed by teachers over and over again) that the pure fact of having a plagiarism checker at your institution helps prevent it. It enables a conversation around the topic, how to avoid it and why it is a danger to academic integrity.

*(https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/apr/29/cheating-at-top-uk-universities-soars-by-30-per-cent)


Collaboration between schools

In order to look afresh at these and other challenges, Church Cowley Saint James Church of England Primary School in Oxfordshire recently brought together 14 previously unlinked primary schools to work on assessing writing tasks by Year 6 children using technology called RM Compare. This shows teachers two anonymous pieces of work side-by-side on a screen, and the teacher judges which of those best meets the simplified assessment criteria. The system then uses an algorithm to intelligently select and pair similarly ranked work side-by-side. Headteacher Steve Dew says: “The main success of using the technology is the opportunity to collaborate with other schools on what good/great writing looks like. From that our teachers have a good idea of what good writing looks like from a sample of 415 children’s writing, and not just that within our school – this sort of information and analysis has not been available to us previously. This has had a positive impact on how we plan and teach lessons, has raised our bar of expectation and given us some great exemplar material to support the children’s understanding too.”

As Haylie Taylor indicated, the assessment cycle continues after a mark is decided, and can usefully inform educators on how to best teach a given cohort. Dew cites standards in years 3 and 4 as an example of this. He says that the school felt they had a handle on attainment within these classes – but there was a surprise to come when they used RM Compare to assess both year groups (120 children) together. He says, “The crossover of literacy attainment was an eyeopener. For the first time we were able to show that at least 10 children in Year 3 attained in the top 25% of children in Year 4; this helped our conversations with teachers to radically rethink the provision for these children in class.” As educators move towards evidence-based practice, technology is therefore being used to give them the edge. As a result, teachers are making better decisions and able to intervene quickly to improve learning outcomes.

Integrity in HE

Of course, at university level, integrity remains a focus. With the rise of the internet has come an increase in contract cheating whereby students pay for people to create work they later submit as their own, so institutions have to work hard to ensure that the student submitting the work is honest about their contribution. They do this by using the Turnitin plagiarism detection service and increasingly by promoting academic integrity more widely. But with all this intelligent technology to hand, will there come a time when educators’ roles in conducting assessment is actually minimal? Sir Anthony Seldon, vice-chancellor of the University of Buckingham, believes so. Seldon says that once authorship is established, the main concerns are that tutor comments are “formative, constructive, personalised and useful for the students’ further learning, and that staff time is not excessively taken in this process.”

But he claims that artificial intelligence “is a complete game changer on all three fronts because the AI technology will know the student intimately, it will detect at once when the work submitted is not the students’ own, it will be able to give details, personalised and constructive feedback tailored to optimise the learning by each individual student, and it will eliminate almost totally the need for academic and administrative staff to give their own hard-pressed time to assessments.”

If learners are getting this kind of feedback, there can be no doubt that their study time will be spent more purposefully.

But perhaps the most exciting consequence is how teachers and lecturers might use their new-found time to create an even richer experience for their learners.


Pros and cons of technology-enabled assessment (TEA), from the University of Reading

Pros

Improves authenticity and alignment with learning outcomes

Helps to clarify marking criteria

Spreads the assessment load for staff and students

Improves student engagement and promotes deeper learning

Cons

Finances and staff time

Accessibility issues

Large-scale introduction requires a significant level of institutional buy-in

Sense of isolation

Source: https://www.reading.ac.uk/engageinassessment/using-technology/eia-pros-and-cons-of-using-technology.aspx


You might also like: Empowering universities with digital assessment [post_title] => Putting assessment to the test [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => putting-assessment-to-the-test [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-11-17 02:46:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-11-17 02:46:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=19221 [menu_order] => 1497 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17467 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-09-10 00:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-09 23:00:42 [post_content] => By Jonathan Bailey, plagiarism consultant at Turnitin By now, most students understand that they need to paraphrase text that they don’t quote and correctly cite their sources. The question that students often have is not “what do I need to do?” but “how do I do it?” This uncertainty can cause many students to make simple mistakes that can cause them to miss citations in their work, paraphrase poorly or even be accused of outright plagiarism. One of the biggest mistakes is not making citation part of the writing process. Every draft a work goes through should have proper citations, if for no other reason than it’s the easiest and most reliable way to make sure they are all included. Unfortunately, many students don’t choose to write their papers this way; instead, they use a mashup of original content, copied material, and outside data to try and construct a paper. Through this method, citations are often lost, paraphrasing is often incomplete, and the quality of the writing suffers in general. However, the good news is that fixing this is as easy as adjusting the writing process and taking advantage of the tools students already have.

Proper paraphrasing

For many students, paraphrasing is about trying to “change” an existing text so that it is somehow “different enough” to be considered original. However, paraphrasing is supposed to be about putting the information and ideas you’ve learned into your words, not a modified version of someone else’s.
One of the biggest mistakes is not making citation part of the writing process.
The easiest way to do this is to thoroughly read the information that you want to include and then put it away. Close the book, go to a different tab in your browser – whatever it takes to get it away from your eyes. From there, in your word processor, simply explain what you read in your own words. If it helps, pretend that you’re writing a (formal) letter to your instructor or to someone else you know and are trying to share this information with them. It’s important to note that this word processor document should not contain any of your notes. If you wish to use a word processor file to store notes, it should be separate from the one in which you write your paper. The main thing is that all of the words you put on the page come from your keyboard. Though you have to be careful to ensure that you aren’t repeating what you read, as a general rule, what comes from your fingertips is your writing. Any text that you copy and paste should be immediately placed in quotes and left unchanged. Attempting to alter the existing text to turn it into a paraphrase is not only a form of plagiarism but significantly more work than just paraphrasing properly.
Though you have to be careful to ensure that you aren’t repeating what you read, as a general rule, what comes from your fingertips is your writing.

Adding citations and bibliography

If you are paraphrasing your work correctly and writing your paper in a relatively linear fashion, then citations are also fairly easy, especially if you take advantage of the technology you have at your disposal. Microsoft Word, for example, has an entire references tab dedicated to making it simple to add citations in your paper. When you are done adding the information from the work, simply switch to that tab and select the style of citations that you want. From there, click “insert citations” and add the source into your bibliography. Word will provide you with an easy guide for inputting the relevant data. After that, all you have to do is make sure that the source is selected in the citations sidebar and either select “insert citation” if your class uses in-text citations or “insert footnote” if it uses footnotes. Word will insert the citation and format it correctly for you. When you’re done with the paper, all you need to do is hit the “bibliography” button and choose the format you want. While Word will keep track of your citations and update your footnotes accordingly, make sure to select your bibliography, press the down arrow and update citations if you add sources after dropping it in.
Microsoft Word has an entire references tab dedicated to making it simple to add citations in your paper.
Google Docs has a similar, but more limited function called the explore panel. Located under “tools,” it opens a sidebar that allows you easily bring in citations and footnotes. The easiest way is to search for the page you want to reference, click the “web” tab and then click the quote marks to drop in the in-text citation and to add the footnote. You can also change the format of the citation by clicking the three-dot menu in the results panel. Similar to Word, it will also keep track of your citations and renumber and rearrange as them as needed. However, explore does not work with books, journals, or other physical works and it also can’t produce a bibliography. As such, you may need to either manually copy your footnotes into a bibliography or use a Google Docs add-on if you need more robust citation management. The key, however, is to take these steps as you write. When you finish paraphrasing information you learned from a source or after you drop a new quote in, add the citations immediately. Later may be too late. Too many students make the mistake of ignoring this step on their first draft only to realize that it’s much more difficult to do it later. Oftentimes, it’s the result of procrastination, skipping on work in the early part of a project with the intent of doing it later.
When you finish paraphrasing information you learned from a source or after you drop a new quote in, add the citations immediately.
However, with paraphrasing and citation, that’s simply not practical. Not only is it easy to lose or forget what needs to be cited, but you may not be able to locate the same sources days or weeks later. In short, the best time to cite sources is as you write and as you use them. Waiting until later just invites errors and makes for more difficult work down the road.

Conclusions

In the end, citing as you write is fairly straightforward. Paraphrase by writing your own words, drop in your citation cite after you’ve used the particular source or section thereof, and always immediately quote any text that you copy and paste. While this may mean your first draft will take longer to write, it will also make your later drafts take much less time and ensure that your citations are complete. When your work is all said and done, you should have no doubt about whether or not it contains any plagiarised passages. There should be no surprises waiting for you in a similarity report. You should know it’s original because you wrote it and you will know exactly what is copied because it will be quoted and cited. If you do that, you’ll be able to submit your work with confidence and never worry about being accused of plagiarism again.  Want to provide meaningful student feedback and deter plagiarism? Learn more about Feedback Studio. You can find the original blog post at https://go.turnitin.com/emea/citation-and-paraphrasing [post_title] => How to implement citation and paraphrasing into the writing process [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-implement-citation-and-paraphrasing-into-the-writing-process [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-30 12:36:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-30 11:36:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17467 [menu_order] => 1667 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17471 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-09-03 00:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-02 23:00:23 [post_content] => By Patti West-Smith, senior manager, teaching and learning innovations at Turnitin Research, such as John Hattie’s Visible Learning, has highlighted the impact of feedback on student learning for years now. The effect size varies a bit over time and across studies, but there is no question that providing feedback has a positive effect on student learning. In fact, even students readily admit that receiving specific, timely, relevant feedback makes them more likely to revise and helps them to think critically about how to improve and grow. If we accept the importance of formative feedback, the question becomes what kind of feedback do students need? Across many formative writing tools, such as Turnitin’s Feedback Studio and Revision Assistant, one of the core values that drive the team of veteran educators is a fundamental belief that students need feedback that identifies areas of weakness AND areas of strength. There is much more to say about feedback, in general, but for now, let’s explore positive feedback that zeroes in on what students have done well. There are some perspectives that we can unpack and reframe in order to best serve students’ needs.
  1. Traditional View: Students know that they’ve done a good job when they earn a good grade.
Reframed Understanding: A grade may tell students where they fall on a continuum or scale, and a 'good' grade may even tell them that their work is high on that scale. By itself, though, it doesn’t guide students to understand specifically what they have done well or what they may not have done well.
If we accept the importance of formative feedback, the question becomes what kind of feedback do students need?
Feedback that identifies specific areas where a student has shown particular insight, offered critical evidence, or utilised descriptive imagery gives the student something concrete to revisit with an eye toward doing the same thing in the next task.
  1. Traditional View: Writing "Good job!" or similar accolades let students know they have done well on an assignment.
Reframed Understanding: These acts may inspire good feelings in the student, and perhaps that does have some positive impact on motivation. At the very least, it’s likely to inspire good connotations around the task. That is not without value. Will it, however, help a student to grow? If students don't have a clear, specific understanding of what they did that merited that positive comment, it is unlikely that they will be able to transfer that understanding to a new task. That transfer should be the measure of whether feedback is working. Can a student take this feedback and apply it to other parts of the task or even better, to a new task? That is deep learning, and while a nice sticker or even a good grade might create positive feelings, it doesn’t allow a student to understand what specific strategies they should use the next time. Rather than simply saying, “Good job!” consider adding a specific and actionable comment, such as “Nice use of language in this sentence. Continue choosing words in other parts of your essay that will appeal to your audience's interests or emotions, or help in your purpose of persuading them.”
Students need help to find the areas of their work that they need to re-examine and revise, but they also need us to shine a light on the places where they have excelled or grown.
  1. Traditional View: My students know that if I don’t tell them to revise or correct something, then what they’ve written is strong as it is.
Reframed Understanding: In the absence of any information, students will not assume automatically that they have done well. When all students see are comments about what they need to “fix” or improve, what sticks with them is not going to be that everything else is “fine” or that it is good. It certainly doesn’t highlight for them the parts that are truly well-written, nor does it let them know what they might replicate to improve other parts of their work. Students need help to find the areas of their work that they need to re-examine and revise, but they also need us to shine a light on the places where they have excelled or grown.
  1. Traditional View: I only have so much time to give feedback so I have to focus on identifying the most egregious errors.
Reframed Understanding: The principles that apply to feedback on student weaknesses are just as important when highlighting strengths. I can sense the raised eyebrows and looks of doubt that result from reading that sentence, but it’s true. Any teacher who has spent every waking moment of a weekend scribbling notes on student papers knows that TIME can often be the enemy. You may find yourself thinking, “There’s not enough time in the day to do all that needs to be done, and now I have to make sure that I not only point out weaknesses but also identify specific strengths?” The answer is yes. Providing specific positive feedback may take more time, but the outcome is that students have a better attitude about writing in general, understand their own strengths, and have an understanding of the skills they want to leverage to improve their writing overall. We know that feedback works best when it is:
  • Timely (not weeks later);
  • Specific and relevant (tied to a specific task or product); and
  • Actionable (student writers should walk away with a clear idea of what they can DO in response to teacher feedback)
Most people embrace those principles when it comes to helping students understand what they need to improve. Those same principles apply when we’re spotlighting student strengths. From a purely emotional perspective, positive reinforcement impacts motivation and students’ attitudes toward writing and revision. What if we also work to make sure that students receive timely, relevant, specific, and ACTIONABLE feedback about what they’re doing well? If a student makes strong word choices and embeds powerful evidence to support a claim, isn’t it just as important that we point that out so that they can do it again?
From a purely emotional perspective, positive reinforcement impacts motivation and students’ attitudes toward writing and revision.
Consider how empowering it is to say to a student, “This sentence very strategically connects your evidence to the central claim of your argument. Look for other places in your essay where you can strengthen those connections in a similar way.” Want to incorporate some of these principles in your feedback? Check out our newly released beginner and advanced Spotlight Strengths QuickMark sets developed by our team of veteran teachers. There are two sets so that you can find what best suits your needs: one set is aimed at younger students and the other is geared toward older students. The QMs in these sets crossover different writing genres so you’ll find a nice variety. To read the original blog post, visit https://go.turnitin.com/emea/going-beyond-good-job [post_title] => Going beyond 'good job': Four ways to rethink student feedback [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => going-beyond-good-job-four-ways-to-rethink-student-feedback [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-28 13:55:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-28 12:55:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17471 [menu_order] => 1677 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17463 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-08-27 14:30:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-27 13:30:25 [post_content] => By Patti West-Smith, senior manager, teaching and learning innovations at Turnitin I’m an English teacher by training so what I’m about to say may sound a bit like sacrilege, but it needs to be said… Not all writing comes in the form of an essay. Hear me out! I’m not demonising essays. There are meaningful tasks that demand an essay or other extended writing, and to be able to form fully-developed, cohesive ideas or arguments is a necessary form of communication. However, that is not the only type of writing required in the world, nor is it the only kind of writing that teachers are asking students to perform as part of their learning.

The what and why of shorter forms of writing

Sometimes a paragraph or two is a perfectly reasonable product, and sometimes even a graphic organiser is more appropriate. There are even times when a phrase, sentence, or small collection of sentences is the right form for the task, and there are many reasons why a shorter form of writing might be the best fit. Time, of course, is always a factor – both the instructional time required to complete the task and the time needed to provide feedback on the writing.  Discipline might also play a part in this kind of choice; some content or types of inquiry lend themselves to short-form written responses. Purpose, too, should not be ignored as a motivating component in this kind of writing. The reality is that people need to express themselves in diverse ways, and a variety of writing types across the scope of an education helps to strengthen all the muscles needed to know how to (and even when to) use those different writing formats to suit different tasks.
The reality is that people need to express themselves in diverse ways, and a variety of writing types across the scope of an education helps to strengthen all the muscles needed to know how to (and even when to) use those different writing formats to suit different tasks.

Using fundamental writing instruction principles to teach shorter forms

If that premise is true, educators have to take a closer look at what is known about writing instruction:
  • Do the stages of the writing process need to be observed in the same way?
  • Does the scaffolding involved in this kind of writing instruction require adaptation?
  • What works and doesn’t work when we broaden our perception of writing to include a variety of forms?
The answers to those questions may vary according to the exact parameters of what students are writing; however, there are a few things that hold true across writing tasks:
  1. Students need clear expectations of measures of quality for shorter writings

Though the product may be shorter, it is still absolutely essential that students have a thorough understanding of the criteria that will be used to evaluate their writing and what the various performance levels are. That means even shorter forms of writing require a rubric. The evidence of mastery will be different, but helping to make those expectations clear to students is still of paramount importance. Rubrics help to make the abstract more concrete for students and act as an important form of communication between the teacher and student. That is no less true for more brief forms of writing.
  1. Students need feedback on the writing, about both areas of strength and areas needing improvement

While it may not be necessary to provide the same volume of feedback on shorter forms of writing, students still need timely, relevant, and actionable feedback on both what they’ve done well and what needs improvement. With these shorter, perhaps less polished pieces of writing, teachers can focus on very specific elements without forgoing the vital direction and guidance that come from effective feedback. Feedback is a chance for instructors to guide students to consider their choices as writers, to think about purpose, ideas, evidence, and all the other aspects of writing. Without feedback, students are often left to fill in the gaps for themselves.
Though the product may be shorter, it is still absolutely essential that students have a thorough understanding of the criteria that will be used to evaluate their writing and what the various performance levels are.
  1. Students need opportunities for revision to grow as effective communicators

Perhaps some may think that it isn’t important to revise and edit shorter forms of writing; however, that belief could result in a missed opportunity that offers so many benefits and potentially supports all writing instruction goals. Though the writing process may be shortened or modified, students still need to internalise and apply feedback. Without opportunities to revise, that is very difficult to do. Additionally, it is a bonus that revising shorter forms of writing will consume far less instructional time so teachers get the double payoff of opportunities to reflect and revise without consuming the class time often associated with longer works. That’s a win-win. To support each one of these principles, the teaching and learning innovations team has developed some resources to help. Check out the newly released science short answer, social studies short answer, and English/language arts rubrics and QuickMark sets within Feedback Studio, as well as upcoming blog posts dedicated to science and social studies, all developed by Turnitin’s group of veteran teachers. For even more resources, check back this autumn when we will release sets of discipline-specific activity ideas geared toward teaching writing effectively across multiple content areas and stay tuned for announcements about webinars to dive into the research even more deeply. To read the original blog post, visit https://go.turnitin.com/emea/writing-essays [post_title] => Writing is not all about essays [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-is-not-all-about-essays [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-27 14:30:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-27 13:30:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17463 [menu_order] => 1688 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13218 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-27 00:00:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-27 00:00:52 [post_content] => By Kristin Van Gompel, Senior Curriculum Specialist at Turnitin Digital literacy skills focus on preparing students to succeed in the global, competitive and connected world in which we live. Although technology is a common discussion thread amongst 21st-century conversation, simply adding it to the classroom does not always achieve the highest possible outcomes. Digital literacy harnesses technology to teach a process for validating information that students can use in all parts of their digital lives. Now is the time to drive digital literacy in the classroom. To truly equip students with the necessary skills for our current and future worlds, it is important to consider how technology is applied. How can technology be implemented to facilitate meaningful learning activities? How can the use of technology in classrooms be shifted from knowledge consumption to knowledge production? How can technology be used effectively in classrooms to mediate learning? Turnitin carefully considers the effective use of technology in learning while developing and improving on our products and supporting resources. Our suite of products, such as Feedback Studio, can help students practise digital literacy skills and exercise higher-level thinking by applying technology in meaningful ways. Here are a few examples highlighting how Turnitin’s Feedback Studio supports 21st-century learning: Information and media literacy Feedback Studio’s Similarity Report presents students and their teachers with a description of similar or matched texts found within a submitted assignment. When engaging with this report (and having an opportunity to revise and resubmit), students practise making judgements on the information and media that they have included in their assignments. In an age where there is an abundance of information, this report can teach students the value of academic integrity. The Similarity Report is designed to encourage students to effectively incorporate legitimate information and media into their writing through proper attribution. By using techniques that aim to prevent plagiarism in future assignments, this helps institutions meet regulatory and awarding body requirements to support ‘Outstanding’ Ofsted status. Locating, retrieving and evaluating credible sources are skills pertinent to developing digital literacy skills. Turnitin provides a comprehensive Source Credibility Guide as an instructional resource for introducing this essential topic in the classroom. By assessing source credibility, students are encouraged to evaluate the quality of a piece of information, which involves considering the origin of a source, as well as who created it and why, before introducing it to an assignment. Valuable resources are readily available on the Turnitin website to help students produce high-quality research and original writing. Life and career skills Collaborative working, critical thinking and clear communication are widely recognised as essential life skills. Today’s educators are in a position to help their students grow to become critical thinkers who can evaluate sources, formulate their own ideas and, ultimately, express these ideas with confidence. Turnitin’s peer review assignment tool, available in Feedback Studio, gives students the opportunity to engage in collaborative learning through a process of giving and receiving feedback on each other’s assignments. PeerMark™ also helps students to develop their independent learning and self-evaluation skills through its self-review option. With the vast amount of available information, it is important for students to understand and take ownership of their ethical responsibilities as a writer by using credible sources, and citing sources correctly. By instilling lifelong skills for success in the 21st-century classroom, educators are able to support students to become independent thinkers and original writers who are prepared for the 21st-century workplace. Feedback Studio offers opportunities for students to engage with digital tools, teachers and peers to mediate learning. Participating in meaningful activities, such as evaluating and choosing how to apply feedback via digital experiences, presents opportunities for students to foster critical thinking skills. Feedback Studio aims to encourage creative, authentic and confident writers, whilst allowing students to take ownership of their learning. To learn more about strengthening digital literacy skills in the 21st-century classroom, visit https://go.turnitin.com/21st-century [post_title] => 21st century learning with Turnitin [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 21st-century-learning-with-turnitin [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-04 09:30:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-04 08:30:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=13218 [menu_order] => 2110 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13130 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-15 00:00:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-15 00:00:49 [post_content] => If we want students to truly understand the many forms of plagiarism and cheating, they must be able to identify credible sources and use them effectively. That is not as easy as it may seem, though.  Advances in technology and the rise of social media mean that we are all inundated with information. As educators, it is imperative that we give our students a process for actively evaluating incoming information and reaching logical conclusions that avoid being passive consumers of information. The process, though, is incredibly complex. Where do we begin?  Let us consider four ‘rules’ we must pass on to students: 1. Consider objectivity  Whether we acknowledge it or not, everyone has bias. A credible source seeks to present a balanced set of information. If sources use loaded language or even derogatory terms, we must question objectivity.  2. Find credible sources. Question the internet (and other sources) Young students are trained to accept information that comes from an authoritative source. When information has been published, it is easy to accept it as accurate and objective, but almost anyone can publish to certain places on the internet and other less reputable publications, so we should not accept it as truth without applying our own logic and asking probing questions. Does this person or group have a goal that is not simply about revealing information or giving an accurate account of events? Often, the answer is yes, and when it is, we should ask ourselves if that goal is influencing the information presented.  3. Don’t be afraid to seek a second opinion Selecting one source of information and accepting it without thought is dangerous. Look for other viewpoints and perspectives. Make it a habit to cross-check information, especially if it appears to be slanted toward one, narrow viewpoint. 4. Above all else, apply reason and ask questions Do not passively consume information and pass it along without thought. Ask questions. This is what it means to be a thoughtful, informed member of society.  To find out more about Turnitin, visit their website. [post_title] => Rules to help today’s learners evaluate source credibility [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rules-to-help-todays-learners-evaluate-source-credibility [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-29 15:41:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-29 14:41:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=13130 [menu_order] => 2145 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13116 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-12 10:26:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-12 10:26:17 [post_content] => What’s the problem? Issues of cheating in education have made worldwide headlines throughout 2018 and into 2019.  ‘Algeria shuts internet to prevent cheating in school exams’; ‘Thousands of students caught cheating across north east’; and ‘India’s “cheating mafia” gets to work as school exam season hits’, are just some of the headlines that have hit the mainstream media over the last year.  The report Malpractice for GCSE, AS and A-level: summer 2018 exam series, published by the UK Government in December 2018, states that 2,735 penalties were issued to students in schools and colleges across England in 2018.  The main reason for these penalties, the report confirms, was students being in possession of a mobile phone. Phones accounted for 47% of all student penalties in 2018, an increase of 22% since 2017.  Despite this increase in phone-related penalties, the overall number of penalties issued in 2018 was actually marginally less than 2017. So why is cheating making headlines now? Matthew Glanville, head of assessment principles and practice at the International Baccalaureate (IB), says that it is the way in which cheating is happening that has changed. He comments: “What we have seen are increases in cases of commercialisation of cheating, where once it was an agreement between friends, now it is a business.”  The change in how cheating is happening affects the way the public views these cases, Glanville argues. “It is easier to empathise with the parent, teacher or friend who is trying to help a struggling student achieve the grade they need, and it is harder to imagine yourself selling essays to strangers,” he says.  Glanville’s colleague at the IB, academic honesty manager Celina Garza, says that it is also true that cheating is now a lot easier to identify and report to the public. “What we have now are better tools for identifying such cases and the dissemination of them. News outlets have a wider reach supported by social media and therefore the public is more aware of such instances. Cheating has just become more ‘visible’,” she says.  The Breakdown:  2,735 penalties were issued to students in schools and colleges across England in 2018. ●  Phones accounted for 47% of all student penalties in 2018, an increase of 22% since 2017. ●  “Cheating has just become more ‘visible’.” – Celina Garza, IB. ●  The number of staff penalties in 2018 is actually down from 2017, but isolated incidents are still occurring. ●  “The increasing high-stakes nature of examinations holds teachers and schools responsible for delivering great grades rather than great teaching.” – Matthew Glanville, IB. ●  Schools and colleges can refer to the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) for official exam rules. ●  “A shift towards a different educational paradigm needs a change in attitude towards performance.” – Celina Garza, IB. Who is involved? It is not only grade-hungry students that are participating in cheating. First of all, a spokesperson for Ofqual told ET: “Exams officers say that most students don’t intend to use their phones to cheat. Students are penalised for having their phones on them, in breach of the rules, even though they didn’t use them.”  This means that a student is reported as having engaged in ‘malpractice’ even if they haven’t tried to actually cheat, per se. This has a large influence on statistics; especially the 47% of penalties issued due to mobile phones.  Secondly, even in the cases where cheating is intentional and planned, sometimes teachers are in the know, if not even encouraging of the behaviour. The number of staff penalties in 2018 is actually down from 2017 (from 1,030 to 620), but isolated incidents are still occurring.  Kamilah Hale, a personal tutor in Kent, has heard reports from pupils of teachers encouraging cheating during SATs exams.  Talking to Education Technology, Hale said: “I’ve had a couple of pupils ask me, ‘is the headteacher supposed to sit next to you in the SATs and give you the answers?’” Hale says that the increased pressure on schoolteachers to present a portfolio of favourable exam results is adding to these instances.  “We’ve had 10-year-olds talking about the Government pressuring teachers. They’re regurgitating a lot of stuff that has obviously come from very pressured teachers. And this has increased in the last three years.”  These pressures happen throughout the school journey, and can certainly add to the instances of malpractice and cheating, says Glanville. “The increasing high stakes nature of examinations, especially holding teachers and schools responsible for delivering great grades rather than great teaching, has created a culture where teachers feel forced to ‘teach to the test’ and students are looking around for every possible advantage in their assessments,” he says.  Where does tech fit in?
A breach of the regulations that might undermine the integrity of an exam may constitute malpractice. It includes attempts by students to communicate with each other during an exam, and failures by school or college staff to comply with exam board instructions – Malpractice for GCSE, AS and A-level: summer 2018 exam series
Despite technology being a large part of education in 2019, exams are somewhat anachronistic. This means that tech is often problematic in an exam situation, says Glanville: “At the moment technology is more of a hindrance than help, but this is because nearly all examinations are still following the 18th-century model of candidates writing examinations in a large hall.” However, there are multiple opportunities for tech to improve exams, he says, especially in terms of changing assessment to more ‘meaningful’ tasks, such as the possibilities of simulating scientific experiments.   There are also ways in which tech can be a help to academia in general, such as spotting plagiarism. Glanville says:  “In terms of academic integrity, tools like Turnitin help spot plagiarism in a way that would not have been possible in the past due to being able to compare all current and past student essays together with the internet. We can also use technology to spot patterns in student answers in examinations.”  If tech has such possibilities, why are plagiarism and cheating still such big problems? It has a lot to do with how easy tech has made the cheating process, says Garza. For instance, plagiarism has always been possible, but with the advent of the internet, and the power of cut and paste, copying large quantities of information has never been easier. “Other forms of cheating are made easier as well,” Garza says, “such as sharing live examination information via social media.”  At the end of the day, it’s about properly harnessing the power of tech, and making sure that its possibilities are met by educators and invigilators. “Despite all the opportunities, technology is being better utilised by those trying to cheat than those trying to prevent it,” says Glanville.  Tech also enhances the ability for cheating to become a global issue, says Glanville: “The global nature of technology has helped the tiny minority of students wanting to cheat join up with like-minded people around the world and has supported the commercialisation of cheating. The ‘echo chamber’ effect also helps people to think this behaviour is normal.”  What happens next?
The increasing high-stakes nature of exams has created a culture where teachers feel forced to ‘teach to the test’ and students are looking for every possible advantage - Matthew Glanville
So what can schools and universities do to curb malpractice? An Ofqual spokesperson told ET that schools and colleges can refer to the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) for official rules. “JCQ’s guidelines for the conduct of examinations are clear, and exam boards expect schools and colleges to abide by them,” they said. Ofqual also contacted all headteachers in May 2018 to “remind them about the important job their exams officers perform over the series and throughout the year,” a spokesperson told ET. “We suggested ways in which they could support their exams officers to minimise the opportunity of mistakes and malpractice arising.” For universities, the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) is a good place to start, Ofqual suggests.  Schools are under the biggest burden to discourage cheating, says Glanville. “The battle for academic integrity is really won or lost in the school,” he says, “because this is where teachers can influence students and parents positively. Awarding bodies punishing those they catch can only influence the perception of risk the student has of cheating, not convince them it is wrong.”  Being role models for academic integrity is the best thing that lecturers and teachers can do, says Glanville, and that the education around the morality of cheating needs to start as early as eight years old. Garza agrees, commenting: “Children understand what integrity means, so teaching about integrity and reinforcing attitudes that favour integrity needs to start early on.  As the student progresses in the educational system, schools need to adapt their strategies to offer activities and examples that support their student’s understanding about this.”  For now, it is important to remember that there is a larger systemic issue at play here, and that the education system as a whole needs to change before we can expect to see a real shift. “When all that students can see is that they will be measured according to their academic achievements, it is easy to see too that universities and schools have a difficult battle in front of them,” says Garza. “More emphasis needs to be put on quality of teaching and the development of the student to face the challenges of the future world, but a shift towards a different educational paradigm needs a change in attitude towards performance.”  [post_title] => A culture of cheating [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-culture-of-cheating [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-11-17 02:52:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-11-17 02:52:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=13116 [menu_order] => 2156 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8265 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-04-08 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-07 22:00:00 [post_content] => There is never going to be one date that is ideal for all users, however, most of our large customer base within the HE and FE community prefer the dates which would appear to have the least impact for the most number of users. Understanding the types of activities and interactions happening within your Moodle installation is key to finding out the best period to perform a Moodle upgrade. For instance you can request for us to provide you with reports within Moodle to identify the period with the least or no current Moodle/Turnitin submissions planned. Additionally we can provide data on the busiest and quietest days of the week throughout the year. As with previous years’ upgrades, a snapshot is taken prior to the upgrade which is a complete copy of the live Moodle and provides students with ‘read only’ access to ALL of the material on Moodle while the upgrade is in progress. This minimises any actual downtime for users to around 15 minutes. However, the read only site does not provide the ability for students to take part in activities, add to or change Moodle, for example, the following activities cannot be done:
  • Submission of assignments via either Moodle or Turnitin
  • Quiz-based activity
  • Posting new forum topics or replies
Please take account of this when planning Moodle activities during this period. Finally, one of the best things you can do to minimise any perceived disruption to your end users is to tell them of your plans well in advance. Focusing on the new features and tools that will be provided with this release, is a great way to get buy-in and excitement for the upgrade. W: ulcc.ac.uk    [post_title] => Moodle 3 is coming! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => moodle-3-is-coming [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-11-17 02:56:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-11-17 02:56:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 4267 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 14 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30239 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2020-06-30 09:17:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-06-30 08:17:39 [post_content] => Upholding academic integrity is something that's extremely important to education establishments across the world, but edtech is helping to combat cases of students cheating in order to get ahead. It may seem ironic that although some of today’s students are using digital tools and software to be academically dishonest, technology such as cheating prevention tools are also helping teachers and lecturers spot essays that have been paid for or exams where answers have been fraudulently submitted. If you have ever wondered what cheating prevention tools are available for use in the classroom and the ways that they can benefit schools, colleges and universities, then we have put together a guide to explain this type of edtech in more detail. Read on to find out more...

Why are cheating prevention tools important?

Not only do cheating prevention tools help to ensure that the integrity and security of your assessments, essays and exams are maintained, but they can also provide your teaching staff and students with total peace of mind. At a time when online delivery is going to be more common, for the time being at least, cheating prevention tools offer education establishments the opportunity to engage with their students and remind them why honesty and integrity is so important when it comes to their studies, especially in regards to the authenticity and originality of their work. One of the biggest challenges of the remote classroom is that students are able to collude and copy/paste information from the internet more easily without detection. In addition, the freedom of studying from home means that some students are more tempted to turn to plagiarism or the help of others to complete their work. On top of this, it has never been more vital to regularly communicate with students, and ensure that they know how to access the learning support that's available to them. Online cheating prevention technology can help establishments engage with their students in a creative way, as well as address any suspicions of academic misconduct without the need for face-to-face meetings or panels.

What brands manufacture cheating prevention tools?

There are several key brands within the cheating prevention tools marketplace. Some of the most notable brands include Turnitin, Plagscan and Urkund.

How can institutions run exams online and keep them secure?

In light of the current global COVID-19 pandemic, many educational institutions are making the move to run their exams online for the foreseeable future. In these unprecedented and uncertain times, it's going to be increasingly important for schools, colleges and universities to minimise the learning disruption for their students, and maintain academic integrity at the same time. Online examination software such Speedwell Software can help institutions improve their remote exam processes in several ways and ensure they are run securely. Examples of features include statistical analysis and blueprinting (where the desired requirements of an exam can be checked to ensure that the topic or learning objective is at the appropriate difficulty level) can provide insights that can be used to improve online exams on an ongoing basis.

What tools can be used to prevent cheating?

There are several options available for teachers and lecturers who want to ensure they can deliver high-quality assessments on a secure, remote basis. Some common features of cheating prevention tools include:
  • Integrated assessment system: If you’re looking to create and administer your exams in one place, as well as receive a range of analytics and reports, then an integrated assessment system is for you. Not only is this type of system easy to use, but it will also help to ensure that your online exams can run in a completely secure way.
  • Preventing plagiarism: A system that is designed to prevent plagiarism will check essays and submissions against an extremely large record of current and archived web pages, student submissions on a global basis, as well as journal articles. On top of helping to encourage academic integrity, they can also help to tackle emerging challenges such as text spinners and contract cheating, and also provide feedback for students that allows them to reflect on their own approach to their studies.
  • Cloud hosting: To get your online exams established as quickly as possible, a secure cloud hosting option could provide an extremely effective solution. As well as reducing the need to invest in additional software or infrastructure, all of this will be managed by the tool provider. In addition, you will also benefit from the latest version of the technology, and will receive all of the latest updates.
  • Fully automated: Some systems have the capability to detect, prevent and manage plagiarism, regardless of the language the text is written in, through text recognition. As part of this, fully automated reports are produced which allow educators to explore a range of insights, and these can then be used to take action against students that they suspect of cheating.
  • Integrate with existing LMS: If you already use an existing LMS (Learning Management System), you may want to find a cheating prevention tool that can seamlessly integrate with it. Luckily, many systems are already compatible with some of education’s most popular platforms, including Moodle and Canvas. It’s also possible to easily import documents directly from your computer, or file storage services such as OneDrive, Google Drive and Dropbox.
While the length of time that education establishments will need to operate remotely is still uncertain, the need to ensure that exams and assessments are completed with integrity is something that will never change. To minimise the risk of plagiarism and cheating at this current time, cheating prevention platforms can not only help to protect your reputation, but also give both students and teaching staff the tools that they need to get ahead. To find out more about cheating prevention tools, read our buyer’s guides: Turnitin: Tools to ensure remote assessment with integrity Speedwell Software: Run secure exams remotely Urkund: Preventing plagiarism not punishing it [post_title] => Cheating prevention tools: helping to promote honesty and integrity in education [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cheating-prevention-tools-helping-to-promote-honesty-and-integrity-in-education [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-30 13:49:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-30 12:49:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/?p=30239 [menu_order] => 978 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 14 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 35b2eb20748e5227e6410fabb6a0b946 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
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Turnitin actively partners with educators and institutions to enhance academic integrity and excellence through formative tools and educational resources. Turnitin provides instructors with the tools to engage students in the writing process, provide personalised feedback, and assess student progress over time. Turnitin is used by more than 26 million students at 15,000 institutions in 140 countries.

Turnitin Feedback Studio is an innovative industry-leading service for originality checking, feedback, and peer review. As well as saving educators time assessing work, it raises standards of academic integrity by matching against the most comprehensive database available and enables the provision of engaging feedback that improves student writing and learning.

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