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'webinar_group_webinar' AND ( ( mt1.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt2.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND mt2.meta_value = '0' ) ) AND ( mt3.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt4.meta_key = 'protected' AND mt4.meta_value = '0' ) ) ) ) AND ehetposts.post_type = 'post' AND ((ehetposts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY ehetposts.ID ORDER BY ehetposts.menu_order, ehetposts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20952 [post_author] => 86 [post_date] => 2020-01-15 14:59:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-15 14:59:59 [post_content] => Bett 2020 kicks off in just one week, meaning educators and edtech providers are gearing up to explore the best products and services the sector has to offer. This year, Turnitin is set to exhibit more of its transformative solutions. In just 18 months, the company has launched Authorship, the first product to help institutions investigate contract cheating; and Gradescope, a product that has used machine learning to revolutionise the grading process. Following Turnitin's announcement of its new partnership with Microsoft at the event last year, the team will announce the general availability of its Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020. Armed with Turnitin within Microsoft Teams, teachers can access the most comprehensive plagiarism detection solution alongside their favourite Microsoft apps.
You might also like: New Bett body looks to shape education worldwide
At 2pm on 22 and 23 of January, and 11am on 24 January at Bett, Turnitin will welcome two special guests from Barnsley College to its stand (Hall N1-19, Stand NM40). Rob Whitehead and Rob Lea will share their experience of Turnitin in Microsoft Teams, touching on Barnsley's fivefold increase in student engagement, as well as improvements in helping teachers save time. College representatives will also share tips and insights on how using Turnitin and Microsoft Teams alongside each other has helped teachers prepare students for success in university and beyond, instilling a culture of academic integrity, encouraging critical thinking and strengthening digital literacy. To register your attendance for Bett 2020, click here [post_title] => Turnitin to showcase Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => turnitin-microsoft-teams-integration-bett-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=20952 [menu_order] => 301 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17467 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-09-10 00:00:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-09 23:00:42 [post_content] => By Jonathan Bailey, plagiarism consultant at Turnitin By now, most students understand that they need to paraphrase text that they don’t quote and correctly cite their sources. The question that students often have is not “what do I need to do?” but “how do I do it?” This uncertainty can cause many students to make simple mistakes that can cause them to miss citations in their work, paraphrase poorly or even be accused of outright plagiarism. One of the biggest mistakes is not making citation part of the writing process. Every draft a work goes through should have proper citations, if for no other reason than it’s the easiest and most reliable way to make sure they are all included. Unfortunately, many students don’t choose to write their papers this way; instead, they use a mashup of original content, copied material, and outside data to try and construct a paper. Through this method, citations are often lost, paraphrasing is often incomplete, and the quality of the writing suffers in general. However, the good news is that fixing this is as easy as adjusting the writing process and taking advantage of the tools students already have.

Proper paraphrasing

For many students, paraphrasing is about trying to “change” an existing text so that it is somehow “different enough” to be considered original. However, paraphrasing is supposed to be about putting the information and ideas you’ve learned into your words, not a modified version of someone else’s.
One of the biggest mistakes is not making citation part of the writing process.
The easiest way to do this is to thoroughly read the information that you want to include and then put it away. Close the book, go to a different tab in your browser – whatever it takes to get it away from your eyes. From there, in your word processor, simply explain what you read in your own words. If it helps, pretend that you’re writing a (formal) letter to your instructor or to someone else you know and are trying to share this information with them. It’s important to note that this word processor document should not contain any of your notes. If you wish to use a word processor file to store notes, it should be separate from the one in which you write your paper. The main thing is that all of the words you put on the page come from your keyboard. Though you have to be careful to ensure that you aren’t repeating what you read, as a general rule, what comes from your fingertips is your writing. Any text that you copy and paste should be immediately placed in quotes and left unchanged. Attempting to alter the existing text to turn it into a paraphrase is not only a form of plagiarism but significantly more work than just paraphrasing properly.
Though you have to be careful to ensure that you aren’t repeating what you read, as a general rule, what comes from your fingertips is your writing.

Adding citations and bibliography

If you are paraphrasing your work correctly and writing your paper in a relatively linear fashion, then citations are also fairly easy, especially if you take advantage of the technology you have at your disposal. Microsoft Word, for example, has an entire references tab dedicated to making it simple to add citations in your paper. When you are done adding the information from the work, simply switch to that tab and select the style of citations that you want. From there, click “insert citations” and add the source into your bibliography. Word will provide you with an easy guide for inputting the relevant data. After that, all you have to do is make sure that the source is selected in the citations sidebar and either select “insert citation” if your class uses in-text citations or “insert footnote” if it uses footnotes. Word will insert the citation and format it correctly for you. When you’re done with the paper, all you need to do is hit the “bibliography” button and choose the format you want. While Word will keep track of your citations and update your footnotes accordingly, make sure to select your bibliography, press the down arrow and update citations if you add sources after dropping it in.
Microsoft Word has an entire references tab dedicated to making it simple to add citations in your paper.
Google Docs has a similar, but more limited function called the explore panel. Located under “tools,” it opens a sidebar that allows you easily bring in citations and footnotes. The easiest way is to search for the page you want to reference, click the “web” tab and then click the quote marks to drop in the in-text citation and to add the footnote. You can also change the format of the citation by clicking the three-dot menu in the results panel. Similar to Word, it will also keep track of your citations and renumber and rearrange as them as needed. However, explore does not work with books, journals, or other physical works and it also can’t produce a bibliography. As such, you may need to either manually copy your footnotes into a bibliography or use a Google Docs add-on if you need more robust citation management. The key, however, is to take these steps as you write. When you finish paraphrasing information you learned from a source or after you drop a new quote in, add the citations immediately. Later may be too late. Too many students make the mistake of ignoring this step on their first draft only to realize that it’s much more difficult to do it later. Oftentimes, it’s the result of procrastination, skipping on work in the early part of a project with the intent of doing it later.
When you finish paraphrasing information you learned from a source or after you drop a new quote in, add the citations immediately.
However, with paraphrasing and citation, that’s simply not practical. Not only is it easy to lose or forget what needs to be cited, but you may not be able to locate the same sources days or weeks later. In short, the best time to cite sources is as you write and as you use them. Waiting until later just invites errors and makes for more difficult work down the road.

Conclusions

In the end, citing as you write is fairly straightforward. Paraphrase by writing your own words, drop in your citation cite after you’ve used the particular source or section thereof, and always immediately quote any text that you copy and paste. While this may mean your first draft will take longer to write, it will also make your later drafts take much less time and ensure that your citations are complete. When your work is all said and done, you should have no doubt about whether or not it contains any plagiarised passages. There should be no surprises waiting for you in a similarity report. You should know it’s original because you wrote it and you will know exactly what is copied because it will be quoted and cited. If you do that, you’ll be able to submit your work with confidence and never worry about being accused of plagiarism again.  Want to provide meaningful student feedback and deter plagiarism? Learn more about Feedback Studio. You can find the original blog post at https://go.turnitin.com/emea/citation-and-paraphrasing [post_title] => How to implement citation and paraphrasing into the writing process [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-implement-citation-and-paraphrasing-into-the-writing-process [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-30 12:36:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-30 11:36:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17467 [menu_order] => 567 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17471 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-09-03 00:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-02 23:00:23 [post_content] => By Patti West-Smith, senior manager, teaching and learning innovations at Turnitin Research, such as John Hattie’s Visible Learning, has highlighted the impact of feedback on student learning for years now. The effect size varies a bit over time and across studies, but there is no question that providing feedback has a positive effect on student learning. In fact, even students readily admit that receiving specific, timely, relevant feedback makes them more likely to revise and helps them to think critically about how to improve and grow. If we accept the importance of formative feedback, the question becomes what kind of feedback do students need? Across many formative writing tools, such as Turnitin’s Feedback Studio and Revision Assistant, one of the core values that drive the team of veteran educators is a fundamental belief that students need feedback that identifies areas of weakness AND areas of strength. There is much more to say about feedback, in general, but for now, let’s explore positive feedback that zeroes in on what students have done well. There are some perspectives that we can unpack and reframe in order to best serve students’ needs.
  1. Traditional View: Students know that they’ve done a good job when they earn a good grade.
Reframed Understanding: A grade may tell students where they fall on a continuum or scale, and a 'good' grade may even tell them that their work is high on that scale. By itself, though, it doesn’t guide students to understand specifically what they have done well or what they may not have done well.
If we accept the importance of formative feedback, the question becomes what kind of feedback do students need?
Feedback that identifies specific areas where a student has shown particular insight, offered critical evidence, or utilised descriptive imagery gives the student something concrete to revisit with an eye toward doing the same thing in the next task.
  1. Traditional View: Writing "Good job!" or similar accolades let students know they have done well on an assignment.
Reframed Understanding: These acts may inspire good feelings in the student, and perhaps that does have some positive impact on motivation. At the very least, it’s likely to inspire good connotations around the task. That is not without value. Will it, however, help a student to grow? If students don't have a clear, specific understanding of what they did that merited that positive comment, it is unlikely that they will be able to transfer that understanding to a new task. That transfer should be the measure of whether feedback is working. Can a student take this feedback and apply it to other parts of the task or even better, to a new task? That is deep learning, and while a nice sticker or even a good grade might create positive feelings, it doesn’t allow a student to understand what specific strategies they should use the next time. Rather than simply saying, “Good job!” consider adding a specific and actionable comment, such as “Nice use of language in this sentence. Continue choosing words in other parts of your essay that will appeal to your audience's interests or emotions, or help in your purpose of persuading them.”
Students need help to find the areas of their work that they need to re-examine and revise, but they also need us to shine a light on the places where they have excelled or grown.
  1. Traditional View: My students know that if I don’t tell them to revise or correct something, then what they’ve written is strong as it is.
Reframed Understanding: In the absence of any information, students will not assume automatically that they have done well. When all students see are comments about what they need to “fix” or improve, what sticks with them is not going to be that everything else is “fine” or that it is good. It certainly doesn’t highlight for them the parts that are truly well-written, nor does it let them know what they might replicate to improve other parts of their work. Students need help to find the areas of their work that they need to re-examine and revise, but they also need us to shine a light on the places where they have excelled or grown.
  1. Traditional View: I only have so much time to give feedback so I have to focus on identifying the most egregious errors.
Reframed Understanding: The principles that apply to feedback on student weaknesses are just as important when highlighting strengths. I can sense the raised eyebrows and looks of doubt that result from reading that sentence, but it’s true. Any teacher who has spent every waking moment of a weekend scribbling notes on student papers knows that TIME can often be the enemy. You may find yourself thinking, “There’s not enough time in the day to do all that needs to be done, and now I have to make sure that I not only point out weaknesses but also identify specific strengths?” The answer is yes. Providing specific positive feedback may take more time, but the outcome is that students have a better attitude about writing in general, understand their own strengths, and have an understanding of the skills they want to leverage to improve their writing overall. We know that feedback works best when it is:
  • Timely (not weeks later);
  • Specific and relevant (tied to a specific task or product); and
  • Actionable (student writers should walk away with a clear idea of what they can DO in response to teacher feedback)
Most people embrace those principles when it comes to helping students understand what they need to improve. Those same principles apply when we’re spotlighting student strengths. From a purely emotional perspective, positive reinforcement impacts motivation and students’ attitudes toward writing and revision. What if we also work to make sure that students receive timely, relevant, specific, and ACTIONABLE feedback about what they’re doing well? If a student makes strong word choices and embeds powerful evidence to support a claim, isn’t it just as important that we point that out so that they can do it again?
From a purely emotional perspective, positive reinforcement impacts motivation and students’ attitudes toward writing and revision.
Consider how empowering it is to say to a student, “This sentence very strategically connects your evidence to the central claim of your argument. Look for other places in your essay where you can strengthen those connections in a similar way.” Want to incorporate some of these principles in your feedback? Check out our newly released beginner and advanced Spotlight Strengths QuickMark sets developed by our team of veteran teachers. There are two sets so that you can find what best suits your needs: one set is aimed at younger students and the other is geared toward older students. The QMs in these sets crossover different writing genres so you’ll find a nice variety. To read the original blog post, visit https://go.turnitin.com/emea/going-beyond-good-job [post_title] => Going beyond 'good job': Four ways to rethink student feedback [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => going-beyond-good-job-four-ways-to-rethink-student-feedback [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-28 13:55:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-28 12:55:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17471 [menu_order] => 577 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17463 [post_author] => 73 [post_date] => 2019-08-27 14:30:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-27 13:30:25 [post_content] => By Patti West-Smith, senior manager, teaching and learning innovations at Turnitin I’m an English teacher by training so what I’m about to say may sound a bit like sacrilege, but it needs to be said… Not all writing comes in the form of an essay. Hear me out! I’m not demonising essays. There are meaningful tasks that demand an essay or other extended writing, and to be able to form fully-developed, cohesive ideas or arguments is a necessary form of communication. However, that is not the only type of writing required in the world, nor is it the only kind of writing that teachers are asking students to perform as part of their learning.

The what and why of shorter forms of writing

Sometimes a paragraph or two is a perfectly reasonable product, and sometimes even a graphic organiser is more appropriate. There are even times when a phrase, sentence, or small collection of sentences is the right form for the task, and there are many reasons why a shorter form of writing might be the best fit. Time, of course, is always a factor – both the instructional time required to complete the task and the time needed to provide feedback on the writing.  Discipline might also play a part in this kind of choice; some content or types of inquiry lend themselves to short-form written responses. Purpose, too, should not be ignored as a motivating component in this kind of writing. The reality is that people need to express themselves in diverse ways, and a variety of writing types across the scope of an education helps to strengthen all the muscles needed to know how to (and even when to) use those different writing formats to suit different tasks.
The reality is that people need to express themselves in diverse ways, and a variety of writing types across the scope of an education helps to strengthen all the muscles needed to know how to (and even when to) use those different writing formats to suit different tasks.

Using fundamental writing instruction principles to teach shorter forms

If that premise is true, educators have to take a closer look at what is known about writing instruction:
  • Do the stages of the writing process need to be observed in the same way?
  • Does the scaffolding involved in this kind of writing instruction require adaptation?
  • What works and doesn’t work when we broaden our perception of writing to include a variety of forms?
The answers to those questions may vary according to the exact parameters of what students are writing; however, there are a few things that hold true across writing tasks:
  1. Students need clear expectations of measures of quality for shorter writings

Though the product may be shorter, it is still absolutely essential that students have a thorough understanding of the criteria that will be used to evaluate their writing and what the various performance levels are. That means even shorter forms of writing require a rubric. The evidence of mastery will be different, but helping to make those expectations clear to students is still of paramount importance. Rubrics help to make the abstract more concrete for students and act as an important form of communication between the teacher and student. That is no less true for more brief forms of writing.
  1. Students need feedback on the writing, about both areas of strength and areas needing improvement

While it may not be necessary to provide the same volume of feedback on shorter forms of writing, students still need timely, relevant, and actionable feedback on both what they’ve done well and what needs improvement. With these shorter, perhaps less polished pieces of writing, teachers can focus on very specific elements without forgoing the vital direction and guidance that come from effective feedback. Feedback is a chance for instructors to guide students to consider their choices as writers, to think about purpose, ideas, evidence, and all the other aspects of writing. Without feedback, students are often left to fill in the gaps for themselves.
Though the product may be shorter, it is still absolutely essential that students have a thorough understanding of the criteria that will be used to evaluate their writing and what the various performance levels are.
  1. Students need opportunities for revision to grow as effective communicators

Perhaps some may think that it isn’t important to revise and edit shorter forms of writing; however, that belief could result in a missed opportunity that offers so many benefits and potentially supports all writing instruction goals. Though the writing process may be shortened or modified, students still need to internalise and apply feedback. Without opportunities to revise, that is very difficult to do. Additionally, it is a bonus that revising shorter forms of writing will consume far less instructional time so teachers get the double payoff of opportunities to reflect and revise without consuming the class time often associated with longer works. That’s a win-win. To support each one of these principles, the teaching and learning innovations team has developed some resources to help. Check out the newly released science short answer, social studies short answer, and English/language arts rubrics and QuickMark sets within Feedback Studio, as well as upcoming blog posts dedicated to science and social studies, all developed by Turnitin’s group of veteran teachers. For even more resources, check back this autumn when we will release sets of discipline-specific activity ideas geared toward teaching writing effectively across multiple content areas and stay tuned for announcements about webinars to dive into the research even more deeply. To read the original blog post, visit https://go.turnitin.com/emea/writing-essays [post_title] => Writing is not all about essays [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-is-not-all-about-essays [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-27 14:30:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-27 13:30:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17463 [menu_order] => 588 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13218 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-27 00:00:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-27 00:00:52 [post_content] => By Kristin Van Gompel, Senior Curriculum Specialist at Turnitin Digital literacy skills focus on preparing students to succeed in the global, competitive and connected world in which we live. Although technology is a common discussion thread amongst 21st-century conversation, simply adding it to the classroom does not always achieve the highest possible outcomes. Digital literacy harnesses technology to teach a process for validating information that students can use in all parts of their digital lives. Now is the time to drive digital literacy in the classroom. To truly equip students with the necessary skills for our current and future worlds, it is important to consider how technology is applied. How can technology be implemented to facilitate meaningful learning activities? How can the use of technology in classrooms be shifted from knowledge consumption to knowledge production? How can technology be used effectively in classrooms to mediate learning? Turnitin carefully considers the effective use of technology in learning while developing and improving on our products and supporting resources. Our suite of products, such as Feedback Studio, can help students practise digital literacy skills and exercise higher-level thinking by applying technology in meaningful ways. Here are a few examples highlighting how Turnitin’s Feedback Studio supports 21st-century learning: Information and media literacy Feedback Studio’s Similarity Report presents students and their teachers with a description of similar or matched texts found within a submitted assignment. When engaging with this report (and having an opportunity to revise and resubmit), students practise making judgements on the information and media that they have included in their assignments. In an age where there is an abundance of information, this report can teach students the value of academic integrity. The Similarity Report is designed to encourage students to effectively incorporate legitimate information and media into their writing through proper attribution. By using techniques that aim to prevent plagiarism in future assignments, this helps institutions meet regulatory and awarding body requirements to support ‘Outstanding’ Ofsted status. Locating, retrieving and evaluating credible sources are skills pertinent to developing digital literacy skills. Turnitin provides a comprehensive Source Credibility Guide as an instructional resource for introducing this essential topic in the classroom. By assessing source credibility, students are encouraged to evaluate the quality of a piece of information, which involves considering the origin of a source, as well as who created it and why, before introducing it to an assignment. Valuable resources are readily available on the Turnitin website to help students produce high-quality research and original writing. Life and career skills Collaborative working, critical thinking and clear communication are widely recognised as essential life skills. Today’s educators are in a position to help their students grow to become critical thinkers who can evaluate sources, formulate their own ideas and, ultimately, express these ideas with confidence. Turnitin’s peer review assignment tool, available in Feedback Studio, gives students the opportunity to engage in collaborative learning through a process of giving and receiving feedback on each other’s assignments. PeerMark™ also helps students to develop their independent learning and self-evaluation skills through its self-review option. With the vast amount of available information, it is important for students to understand and take ownership of their ethical responsibilities as a writer by using credible sources, and citing sources correctly. By instilling lifelong skills for success in the 21st-century classroom, educators are able to support students to become independent thinkers and original writers who are prepared for the 21st-century workplace. Feedback Studio offers opportunities for students to engage with digital tools, teachers and peers to mediate learning. Participating in meaningful activities, such as evaluating and choosing how to apply feedback via digital experiences, presents opportunities for students to foster critical thinking skills. Feedback Studio aims to encourage creative, authentic and confident writers, whilst allowing students to take ownership of their learning. To learn more about strengthening digital literacy skills in the 21st-century classroom, visit https://go.turnitin.com/21st-century [post_title] => 21st century learning with Turnitin [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 21st-century-learning-with-turnitin [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-04 09:30:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-04 08:30:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=13218 [menu_order] => 1018 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13130 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-02-15 00:00:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-15 00:00:49 [post_content] => If we want students to truly understand the many forms of plagiarism and cheating, they must be able to identify credible sources and use them effectively. That is not as easy as it may seem, though.  Advances in technology and the rise of social media mean that we are all inundated with information. As educators, it is imperative that we give our students a process for actively evaluating incoming information and reaching logical conclusions that avoid being passive consumers of information. The process, though, is incredibly complex. Where do we begin?  Let us consider four ‘rules’ we must pass on to students: 1. Consider objectivity  Whether we acknowledge it or not, everyone has bias. A credible source seeks to present a balanced set of information. If sources use loaded language or even derogatory terms, we must question objectivity.  2. Find credible sources. Question the internet (and other sources) Young students are trained to accept information that comes from an authoritative source. When information has been published, it is easy to accept it as accurate and objective, but almost anyone can publish to certain places on the internet and other less reputable publications, so we should not accept it as truth without applying our own logic and asking probing questions. Does this person or group have a goal that is not simply about revealing information or giving an accurate account of events? Often, the answer is yes, and when it is, we should ask ourselves if that goal is influencing the information presented.  3. Don’t be afraid to seek a second opinion Selecting one source of information and accepting it without thought is dangerous. Look for other viewpoints and perspectives. Make it a habit to cross-check information, especially if it appears to be slanted toward one, narrow viewpoint. 4. Above all else, apply reason and ask questions Do not passively consume information and pass it along without thought. Ask questions. This is what it means to be a thoughtful, informed member of society.  To find out more about Turnitin, visit their website. 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This year, Turnitin is set to exhibit more of its transformative solutions. In just 18 months, the company has launched Authorship, the first product to help institutions investigate contract cheating; and Gradescope, a product that has used machine learning to revolutionise the grading process. Following Turnitin's announcement of its new partnership with Microsoft at the event last year, the team will announce the general availability of its Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020. Armed with Turnitin within Microsoft Teams, teachers can access the most comprehensive plagiarism detection solution alongside their favourite Microsoft apps.
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At 2pm on 22 and 23 of January, and 11am on 24 January at Bett, Turnitin will welcome two special guests from Barnsley College to its stand (Hall N1-19, Stand NM40). Rob Whitehead and Rob Lea will share their experience of Turnitin in Microsoft Teams, touching on Barnsley's fivefold increase in student engagement, as well as improvements in helping teachers save time. College representatives will also share tips and insights on how using Turnitin and Microsoft Teams alongside each other has helped teachers prepare students for success in university and beyond, instilling a culture of academic integrity, encouraging critical thinking and strengthening digital literacy. To register your attendance for Bett 2020, click here [post_title] => Turnitin to showcase Microsoft Teams integration at Bett 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => turnitin-microsoft-teams-integration-bett-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-15 10:42:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=20952 [menu_order] => 301 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 6 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 8197854fd3eda40add989b0dcaac8270 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
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Turnitin actively partners with educators and institutions to enhance academic integrity and excellence through formative tools and educational resources. Turnitin provides instructors with the tools to engage students in the writing process, provide personalised feedback, and assess student progress over time. Turnitin is used by more than 26 million students at 15,000 institutions in 140 countries.

Turnitin Feedback Studio is an innovative industry-leading service for originality checking, feedback, and peer review. As well as saving educators time assessing work, it raises standards of academic integrity by matching against the most comprehensive database available and enables the provision of engaging feedback that improves student writing and learning.

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Download our free Turnitin Digital Literacy Skills tip sheets

Help your students develop key digital literacy skills and encourage a culture of academic integrity at your institution with the Turnitin free Addressing Academic Integrity through Digital Literacy tip sheet.

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Meaningful insights. Authentic writers.

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