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The UK government is keen to encourage more schools to reap the benefits of edtech, unveiling its new strategy – backed by £10 million of investment – to use technology to reduce teacher workload, boost student outcomes and help level the playing field for those with special needs and disabilities.
As this generation of students becomes increasingly visual, the emphasis is on educators to take advantage of modern technology to capture the attention of pupils and increase their engagement with the curriculum.
School-age children in modern Britain have been born and raised in the digital era and are well-versed in using technology as part of their everyday lives. For them, walking in to a classroom full of interactive screens and tablets is normal. In fact, according to the National Centre for Education Statistics, tablet computers are now used in 70% of schools in the UK. As this generation of students becomes increasingly visual, the emphasis is on educators to take advantage of modern technology to capture the attention of pupils and increase their engagement with the curriculum. The rise of video the-rise-of-video As a result, teachers are now using videos more than ever, with research showing 70% of educators use video in the classroom multiple times per week. Known as video-assisted learning (VAL), this process enables students to acquire knowledge, competence and skills by using audio-visual aids as instructional resources. The benefits of VAL, on both students and teachers, are one of the main driving forces for the rapid adoption of video in the classroom.

You might also like: The video revolution has transformed so much in life – why not education? Video is a powerful tool encompassing a range of skills needed for the future, but it’s not being effectively utilised in schools, says Encyclopaedia Britannica’s Caroline Kennard. Read the full article here.


We regularly speak to teachers who use video as a way to improve student development and academic performance. For them, using video as a primary teaching aid has three key benefits:
  1. Increases student engagement The human brain processes visual images 60,000 times faster than written words, making video a powerful tool for learning and retaining important information. Recent studies have shown a direct correlation between the use of video-assisted learning and improved academic performance.
  2. Facilitates active group discussion As students move through primary and secondary school into higher education, they are expected to take on a more active role in the learning process. Video is a great way of encouraging group discussion and collaboration, as well as fostering creative and critical problem-solving skills.
  3. Supports the flipped education model and SEND pupils Video resources are available online and can be viewed and re-watched outside of the traditional classroom environment, helping students learn at their own pace. Captions can also help deaf students benefit from visual content.
It is no surprise then that many teachers are using video as a blended learning tool to maximise student outcomes. Imagine a GCSE history lesson discussing World War Two: twenty years ago the most common teaching method was a combination of lectures and textbooks, whereas now pupils can use video to supplement written materials. Reading about historical events is one thing, but being able to see and hear elements of them offers a much deeper, immersive learning experience. Taking video to the max taking-video-to-the-max Video has now become the richest medium for teaching and learning, effectively communicating complex information to students and supporting them as they explore new topics. However there are still a number of challenges posed by sourcing and integrating visual content into everyday lesson plans, challenges which edtech is now helping to overcome:
  1. Finding suitable content This is perhaps the most obvious: many teachers are time-poor and it can at times be difficult to source quality video content which is not only relevant to the subject matter, but is also free from copyright, age-appropriate for its intended audience and comes from a reliable source. Many edtech display providers now offer their own embedded software platforms with video libraries curated to subject areas and age levels.
  2. Getting rid of advertisements When using free video platforms such as YouTube, advertising can interrupt the flow of a video and negatively impact student engagement. To negate this issue, many video-streaming platforms now provide ad-free access to educational institutions.
  3. Showing it off Sourcing great content is one thing, but being able to effectively showcase it to a class of 30 students is another – arguably a more important one. Many schools who regularly use video content have adopted the use of interactive flat panels (IFPs) as the main display hubs in their classrooms. For those schools with tablet devices for students, content can also be wirelessly mirrored onto the main screen – helping increase individual student engagement even further.
Education’s future educations-future The use of video in education is only going to increase as more resources (both financial and technological) become available for schools. By harnessing the power of edtech, teachers can not only broaden the minds of their students on specific topics but also broaden their horizons – helping them thrive as they move through the education system. [post_title] => How video-assisted-learning is making a real impact on education [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-video-assisted-learning-is-making-a-real-impact-on-education [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-14 15:27:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-14 14:27:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=18753 [menu_order] => 478 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17045 [post_author] => 77 [post_date] => 2019-08-13 00:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-12 23:00:53 [post_content] => It’s no secret that video is everywhere in today’s world, with the average eight–18-year-old consuming 6–9 hours of digital media each day and 71% of three–18-year-olds accessing and using the internet at home*. But did you know that according to research (Kaltura 2018), 70% of educators use video in the classroom multiple times per week?  With 92% of students and 83% of teachers reporting that videos have a positive impact on their classroom experiences, there’s no denying that videos are being used for teaching more than ever in today’s classrooms. If you would like to utilise the benefits that video can bring to the classroom and are considering using the platform within lessons, video-assisted learning is for you. But what exactly is video-assisted learning, and what impact can it have on the teaching experience and the educational outcomes for students? Why is video-assisted learning important? Video-assisted learning is the process of acquiring defined knowledge, competence and skills with the intelligent use of audio-visual aids as instructional resources, and it has a number of benefits for teaching and learning: ● It produces better cognitive and effective learning outcomes.  ● It enables educators to experiment with digital learning tools.  ● It saves time and raises students’ interest given their proficiency with technology and appetite for online video consumption. ● It increases the retention of knowledge and stimulates understanding and aptitude.  ● It accommodates different learning styles as well as the need to foster creative and critical problem-solving skills.  ● It provides a standardised way of conveying information that can be viewed several times at any moment and from any place where video-enabled devices and internet access are available. [caption id="attachment_17047" align="alignnone" width="790"] myViewBoard Clips allows educators to access more than 2 million licensed educational videos to enhance video-assisted learning[/caption] ViewSonic’s total solutions to education – ViewBoard + myViewBoard ViewSonic is an education solution provider which integrates the interactive flat panel ViewBoard with software solutions myViewBoard and myViewBoard Classroom for educators.  The pioneering system operates on an open-source philosophy and supports Google Classroom and Microsoft Education integration. It also includes a complementary file conversion function, allowing legacy files of major interactive flat-panel brands to be shared across different solution platforms. This determination to empower educators has created a new ‘open’ edtech ecosystem founded on the principles of ‘prepare, present, participate’, and has solidified ViewSonic as leaders in the next generation of edtech resources. ViewSonic’s current education solution already supports video learning through: ● Easily importable multimedia Dragging your cloud-stored videos and YouTube videos onto the board is possible, and hosts are able to capture and record screen images and annotations in the middle of a discussion. Even the most out-of-the-box ideas can be expressed in full with a variety of writing, drawing and multimedia tools. Easily recording and saving of video files to integrated cloud space The embedded cloud integration panels include Google Drive, One Drive and Dropbox. Challenges to video-assisted learning Although video use appears to be an ideal addition to the classroom, there are challenges and concerns around how teachers obtain video content. ● Concerns about time Teachers, who are notoriously time-poor and over-burdened with demands, spend considerable time finding videos to suit their students’ needs, both for use in the classroom and as homework assignments. ● Concerns about trustworthy content Teachers tend to prefer content obtained from sources based on peer assessments and recommendations. Although colleague recommendations can be hugely valuable to the individual teacher, such recommendations may not always reach a large proportion of the teacher community. ● Concerns about safety As online safety becomes a greater concern in education, many educational institutions are restricting access to publicly accessible video platforms, thereby limiting the resources teachers have available to them. Technology could provide a solution to these issues.  myViewBoard Clips – access to over two million educationally relevant videos To solve the current video-assisted learning challenges, ViewSonic has recently partnered with educational video content company Boclips. ViewSonic created a new video-streaming tool, myViewBoard Clips, that allows teachers access to over two million educationally relevant videos to support their learning objectives and easily incorporate them into their lectures and other activities, free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions. The new learning tool contains supplementary content from Boclips’ library of over 150 trusted and renowned media partners, including TED, PBS Newshour and Bloomberg, as well as teacher favourites like Crash Course, Minute Earth and LearnZillion. With educational videos available in different formats and suitable for all age levels, myViewBoard Clips content is suitable for curriculums across the world. Access to these materials will give educators the freedom to create interactive and engaging lessons directly on the myViewBoard canvas.  Recognising the demand from teachers for a rich and relevant in-classroom video repository that is free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions, this partnership helps to greatly reduce teachers’ workload and also enhance student engagement. Through the new educational video-streaming feature myViewBoard Clips, teachers will be able to find video content to support their learning objectives and easily incorporate it into their lectures and other activities, free from commercial distractions and firewall restrictions. ViewSonic solution - the video-assisted learning platform ViewSonic’s solution, equipped with whiteboard environment in hardware and software, is an ideal platform for video-assisted learning, providing rich annotation tools and a sleek writing experience for learning. On ViewSonic’s digital whiteboard platform, educators can access a plethora of safe and relevant video content on top of the already well-established tools. For example, after accessing the videos, educators can explain and elaborate more clearly through adding texts, graphs, photos, diagrams, tables, illustrations, documents, browsers, apps and more beside videos on one canvas.
To learn more about ViewSonic and its products and solutions, visit: www.viewsonic.com/education [post_title] => Make learning more effective and engaging with video-assisted classrooms [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => make-learning-more-effective-and-engaging-with-video-assisted-classrooms [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-08 10:53:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-08 09:53:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=17045 [menu_order] => 623 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 2 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18753 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2019-10-15 07:30:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-15 06:30:41 [post_content] => Digital DNA digital-dna Education technology has already had a profound impact on the UK education system – fundamentally changing the way teachers and students engage and participate in the learning process. The UK government is keen to encourage more schools to reap the benefits of edtech, unveiling its new strategy – backed by £10 million of investment – to use technology to reduce teacher workload, boost student outcomes and help level the playing field for those with special needs and disabilities.
As this generation of students becomes increasingly visual, the emphasis is on educators to take advantage of modern technology to capture the attention of pupils and increase their engagement with the curriculum.
School-age children in modern Britain have been born and raised in the digital era and are well-versed in using technology as part of their everyday lives. For them, walking in to a classroom full of interactive screens and tablets is normal. In fact, according to the National Centre for Education Statistics, tablet computers are now used in 70% of schools in the UK. As this generation of students becomes increasingly visual, the emphasis is on educators to take advantage of modern technology to capture the attention of pupils and increase their engagement with the curriculum. The rise of video the-rise-of-video As a result, teachers are now using videos more than ever, with research showing 70% of educators use video in the classroom multiple times per week. Known as video-assisted learning (VAL), this process enables students to acquire knowledge, competence and skills by using audio-visual aids as instructional resources. The benefits of VAL, on both students and teachers, are one of the main driving forces for the rapid adoption of video in the classroom.

You might also like: The video revolution has transformed so much in life – why not education? Video is a powerful tool encompassing a range of skills needed for the future, but it’s not being effectively utilised in schools, says Encyclopaedia Britannica’s Caroline Kennard. Read the full article here.


We regularly speak to teachers who use video as a way to improve student development and academic performance. For them, using video as a primary teaching aid has three key benefits:
  1. Increases student engagement The human brain processes visual images 60,000 times faster than written words, making video a powerful tool for learning and retaining important information. Recent studies have shown a direct correlation between the use of video-assisted learning and improved academic performance.
  2. Facilitates active group discussion As students move through primary and secondary school into higher education, they are expected to take on a more active role in the learning process. Video is a great way of encouraging group discussion and collaboration, as well as fostering creative and critical problem-solving skills.
  3. Supports the flipped education model and SEND pupils Video resources are available online and can be viewed and re-watched outside of the traditional classroom environment, helping students learn at their own pace. Captions can also help deaf students benefit from visual content.
It is no surprise then that many teachers are using video as a blended learning tool to maximise student outcomes. Imagine a GCSE history lesson discussing World War Two: twenty years ago the most common teaching method was a combination of lectures and textbooks, whereas now pupils can use video to supplement written materials. Reading about historical events is one thing, but being able to see and hear elements of them offers a much deeper, immersive learning experience. Taking video to the max taking-video-to-the-max Video has now become the richest medium for teaching and learning, effectively communicating complex information to students and supporting them as they explore new topics. However there are still a number of challenges posed by sourcing and integrating visual content into everyday lesson plans, challenges which edtech is now helping to overcome:
  1. Finding suitable content This is perhaps the most obvious: many teachers are time-poor and it can at times be difficult to source quality video content which is not only relevant to the subject matter, but is also free from copyright, age-appropriate for its intended audience and comes from a reliable source. Many edtech display providers now offer their own embedded software platforms with video libraries curated to subject areas and age levels.
  2. Getting rid of advertisements When using free video platforms such as YouTube, advertising can interrupt the flow of a video and negatively impact student engagement. To negate this issue, many video-streaming platforms now provide ad-free access to educational institutions.
  3. Showing it off Sourcing great content is one thing, but being able to effectively showcase it to a class of 30 students is another – arguably a more important one. Many schools who regularly use video content have adopted the use of interactive flat panels (IFPs) as the main display hubs in their classrooms. For those schools with tablet devices for students, content can also be wirelessly mirrored onto the main screen – helping increase individual student engagement even further.
Education’s future educations-future The use of video in education is only going to increase as more resources (both financial and technological) become available for schools. By harnessing the power of edtech, teachers can not only broaden the minds of their students on specific topics but also broaden their horizons – helping them thrive as they move through the education system. [post_title] => How video-assisted-learning is making a real impact on education [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-video-assisted-learning-is-making-a-real-impact-on-education [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-14 15:27:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-14 14:27:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://edtechnology.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=blog&p=18753 [menu_order] => 478 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 2 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => e7a34bfc5228adb07c34df9089522a26 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
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What we do

ViewSonic® Corporation, headquartered in Walnut, California, is a leading global provider of computing, consumer electronics, and communications solutions. Founded in 1987, ViewSonic’s mission is to be the preferred global brand of visual solutions as we continue to focus on display-centric product offerings including LED monitors, tablets, projectors, digital signage displays, smartphones, and cloud computing solutions. ViewSonic continues to pioneer in visual technology innovation to build a connected and ever-reaching digital future.

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