Environmental focus for robotics competition

Tomorrow’s Engineers EEP Robotics Challenge is expected to draw entries from hundreds of UK schools

There’s an environmental theme to this year’s Tomorrow’s Engineers EEP Robotics Challenge.

Students from more than 550 schools are set to build, program and control LEGO robots as they undertake a series of environmentally-themed tasks, such as planting a tree.

The event seeks to help entrants explore exciting potential careers, as well as help schools achieve some of their Gatsby benchmarks.

We need creative thinkers with a range of skills and perspectives working together to secure our future.
Dr Hilary Leevers, CEO of EngineeringUK

Fittingly, in a year which saw school strikes for the climate take off across the globe, students will also team up to offer suggestions of how engineers can help future-proof the world.

“The next generation can be part of the solution by choosing engineering careers that will be central to generating affordable and sustainable energy, and to solving other global challenges that they care about, like access to clean water and sanitation,” said Dr Hilary Leevers, CEO of EngineeringUK.

“We need creative thinkers with a range of skills and perspectives working together to secure our future.

“The new environmental challenge was chosen for the Tomorrow’s Engineers EEP Robotics Challenge to address an issue that many of us are passionate about and inspire students as they discover exciting new skills and careers in engineering, technology, robotics and computing.”

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Now in its fifth year, entrants to the competition will have the opportunity to be crowned UK winners at the Big Bang Fair in March.

Teachers can benefit from the scheme, too, via professional development training days and online mentoring.

“Those teachers who have attended Tomorrow’s Engineers EEP Robotics Challenge competitions have all stated that the process has improved wellbeing outcomes, through increased confidence, improved self-esteem and a greater enthusiasm for STEM subjects,” said Marc Fleming, headteacher of serial UK finalists, McLaren High School in Callander, Scotland.

“If you are a school who is thinking of taking part for the first time, do not hesitate in taking up the challenge, your young people will love it.”

To find out more or apply to volunteer, visit: tomorrowsengineers.org.uk  

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