Parents ask for online access

Parents of secondary school pupils want online access to their child’s curriculum so they can help with homework, new survey finds

More than three-quarters (78%) of parents of secondary school pupils surveyed online want to have online access to what their child is learning in school so they can help with homework, according to a new YouGov survey commissioned by online learning platform Firefly.

The online research also found that the overwhelming majority of secondary parents surveyed (71%) were in favour of having more communication with their child’s school through digital channels, while the majority of parents of secondary school children that expressed a preference agreed they would rather get updates on their child’s progress through a digital platform than talking to the teachers on the phone or face to face (56% agreed vs 44% disagreed).

The report found that 71% of secondary school parents want to have more contact with their child’s school through digital channels.

More than three-quarters (78%) of secondary school parents want to have online access to what their child is learning in school so they can help with homework

Two-thirds (66%) of parents want to be able to help their children more with their homework, and 55% would like to get reports on their child’s progress on at least a monthly basis.

“Parents want to get more involved with their child’s education but are frustrated by the lack of access they have to the curriculum and materials necessary for them to be able to help with things like homework,” said Firefly co-founder Simon Hay. 

“The results of our survey also suggest that as well as attending parents’ evenings twice a term, parents want to be able to get information about how their child is doing at school on demand.’

Firefly co-founder Joe Mathewson added: “Teachers, parents and students can all benefit from using a real-time, digital platform to share information about what’s being taught and performance. Firefly’s platform is already being used by hundreds of schools to manage classes and timetables; share classroom and revision notes with students; manage the setting, collection and assessment of work submissions; and keep parents abreast of students’ development.”