‘Computer Forensics’ courses receive Chartered status

Sunderland’s computer forensic programmes accredited by the the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences

The University of Sunderland’s BSc (Hons) Computer Forensics and the BSc (Hons) Computer Forensics (Sandwich) courses have both received the esteemed accreditation.

The areas of the course evaluated for the accreditation include interpretation; evaluation and presentation of evidence; computer network evidence recovery and analysis; digital evidence analysis, recovery and preservation. 

Teaching staff at the University were commended in the letter of notification, ‘on their enthusiasm and commitment to their contribution to the programme’. 

Professor Alastair Irons, from the Faculty of Applies Sciences at the University of Sunderland commented: ‘We are delighted that our computer forensics programmes have been given this national recognition – it is testimony to the hard work of the academic staff, the motivation of the students and the collaboration with employers.’

The panel was also impressed by the nature, scope and extended use of practical assessment on the course, and judged the skills obtained via this method ‘relevant to industry and potentially advantageous in the job market’; while inclusion of options on telecoms and cyber security were deemed as ‘forward looking and valuable to potential employers’. 

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‘The accreditation sets our University apart in the growing cyber-security area, which in turn will create additional opportunities for undergraduates through links with business and make them more attractive to employers once they graduate’

Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Julie Mennell said: “This is a tremendous honour for the University of Sunderland and is testament to the cutting–edge teaching in this subject, as well as the hard work and commitment of the staff involved. The accreditation sets our University apart in the growing cyber-security area, which in turn will create additional opportunities for undergraduates through links with business and make them more attractive to employers once they graduate.” 

The primary aim of the University’s computer forensic programmes is to provide education on the theory and practice of computing, with special emphasis on computer and digital forensics. The programme aims to produce highly skilled and professional graduates with abilities in resolving computer forensic problems and cases.

Students learn to preserve the integrity of evidence, develop and manage computing solutions, be knowledgeable of current and emergent technologies, understand legal, social, ethical and professional responsibilities of computer forensics practitioners and have a broad awareness of the computing industry.

W: www.sunderland.ac.uk

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