Female graduates enjoying higher starting salary than male peers, finds US coding school

Flatiron School reports that, among its 2019 cohort of graduates taking full-time salaried employment, the average wage was 6% higher for women compared to men

The 2020 jobs report on recent graduates from a leading American coding institution makes for an interesting read.

Most notable, perhaps, is Flatiron School’s finding that the average starting salary for its 2019 cohort of women graduates was higher than for their male counterparts.

For job-seeking graduates who accepted full-time salaried employment, the average wage was 6% higher for women compared to men ($72,280 vs $68,365).

Women currently account for 32% of Flatiron students, a fall of 3% from last year. Nevertheless, it remains a relatively high figure for the sector, with the school looking to further parity by partnering with like-minded organisations to offer scholarships and empowerment initiatives such as Women Take Tech.

The jobs report found that, for those 2019 graduates taking full-time contract, internship, apprenticeship, or freelance positions, the starting rate was an average of $32 per hour, more than four times the US minimum wage of $7.25.

“I’m proud that so many students of all backgrounds have entrusted us with their education, and their futures” – Flatiron School co-founder, Adam Enbar

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Flatiron School analysed placement data for 2,262 graduates from its programmes last year. Students took courses across a broad range of coding areas – including software engineering, data science, cybersecurity and user experience/interface design – and learnt either online or at one of eight US campuses, plus another in London.

Those students graduating from on-campus courses had a job placement rate two percentage points higher than their online peers.

Excluding students in receipt of full scholarships, or who were part of a regional pilot data science programme, the average cost of tuition was $13,383.

“We created a purpose-driven company as a response to our experience in tech and passion for driving stronger education, removing the high costs, barriers to entry, and stale classroom experience,” said Adam Enbar, chief executive officer and co-founder of Flatiron School.

“Eight years later, I’m proud that so many students of all backgrounds have entrusted us with their education, and their futures. Our graduates more than doubled in 2019 and exhibited their strength in 2020, a time of great challenge and change. I’m excited to see what we do in 2021.”


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